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Need opinion on my Temps

Last response: in CPUs
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January 6, 2013 4:48:35 AM

Hi Guys,

I would really appreciate if some one could tell me whether iam operating at the right temperatur and voltage.
I have attached a screen grab of my hard ware monitor readings.
Following is my rig

Q6600 @ 2.4ghz non overclocked and STOCK HS
Gtx650 non overclocked
4 Gigs of Corsair XMS2 RAM
160GB seagate Hard drive
Corsair VX450 W SMPS
Zebby peace Cabby

My rooms ambient temperature is around 30 C



and this is my Core temp reading

More about : opinion temps

January 6, 2013 9:33:25 AM

anyone?
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January 6, 2013 9:46:19 AM

Those temps are normal. Nothing to worry about
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January 6, 2013 12:15:48 PM

can you tell me why there is a discrepancy between HW monitor and coretemp?
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January 6, 2013 12:17:16 PM

Are those images taken at the same time?
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January 6, 2013 12:26:50 PM

Core temp seems to be the most reliable of the temperature readings in my experience. Those are the temps I would trust.
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January 6, 2013 12:28:19 PM

I prefer open hardware monitor
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January 6, 2013 12:44:25 PM

Are those temps at idle? 30 C is pretty high for room temp. I know atm when I am gaming the temps in my box are not even 30, in the box not the hardware.
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January 6, 2013 12:48:09 PM

30 degrees is normal for idle. It depends on the ambient temps as well
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January 6, 2013 1:50:12 PM

daraf said:
can you tell me why there is a discrepancy between HW monitor and coretemp?


I used to write and maintain the Core i and Core 2 Temperature Guide here at Tom's from `06 thru `10. We went through this several years ago when the Q6600 was the processor of choice, and Intel wasn't yet forthcoming about Tjunction Max values.

You have the original B3 105 Watt version of the Q6600 which idles at 24 Watts, and was thought to have a Tjunction Max value of 85c. The later G0 95 Watt version idles at 16 Watts and has a Tjunction Max value of 100c, thus a 15c dicrepancy still exists between some temperature monitoring utilities. The Author of Real Temp sorted out the contoversy and coded this most popular and trusted temperature monitoring utility to the correct Tjunction Max values.

From the Introduction of my Guide:

"Core i and Core 2 processors have 2 different types of temperature sensors; a CPU case (not computer case) Thermal Diode centered under the Cores, and Digital Thermal Sensors (DTS) located on each Core. The case Thermal Diode measures Tcase (Temperature case), which is overall CPU temperature, and the Digital Thermal Sensors measure Tjunction (Temperature junction), which are individual Core temperatures. Since these sensors measure 2 distinct thermal levels, there is a 5c temperature difference between them, which is Tcase to Tjunction Gradient. Core i and Core 2 processors have 1 Tcase sensor, and an individual Tjunction sensor on each Core. Uncalibrated default temperatures are seldom accurate.

Intel provides complete specifications for Tcase (CPU temperature), but only partial specifications for Tjunction (Core temperature), which causes much confusion and debate in the overclocking community concerning test methods, temperature monitoring utilities and accuracy. The monitoring utilities provided by motherboard manufacturers monitor CPU temperature, while some popular freeware utilities monitor Core temperatures. The most accurate Core temperature monitoring utility available is Real Temp - http://www.techpowerup.com/realtemp/ - which has many unique and innovative features that include calibrations, and is recommended for users interested in monitoring Core temperatures."

Idle temperatures are much less important than load temperatures, however, although you're running at stock clock, you're also running a Q6600 B3 which idles at 24 Watts on Intel's very poor stock cooler, so your idle temperatures will be higher than a Q6600 G0. Nevertheless, when running Prime95 Small FFT's, which is a steady-state 100% workload, Tcase Max or CPU temperature is Intel's "do not exceed" specification.

Intel's Thermal Specifications are complicated, but the simplified explanation is this; Tcase Max, which is the value shown on Intel's Processor Spec Finder - http://ark.intel.com/products/29765/Intel-Core2-Quad-Pr... - is CPU temperature, NOT Core temperature. This is a very common misconception among most enthusiasts. Since Tcase Max (CPU temp) is 62c for your B3, and Core temperatures are 5c higher than CPU temperature, the maximum Core temperature is 67c.

Q6600 B3: Tcase Max (CPU temperature) 62c, Core temperatures 67c.
Q6600 G0: Tcase Max (CPU temperature) 71c, Core temperatures 76c.

Please download and run the following:

Real Temp 3.7 - http://www.techpowerup.com/realtemp/
CPU-Z 1.62- http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html
Prime95 27.7 - http://mersenne.org/

Run Prime95 on Small FFT's for 10 minutes. Real Temp will report your Core temperatures accurately for your B3. Aslo, Core temperatures are directly proportional to Ambient temperature. Keep in mind that Intel conducts all thermal testing at Standard Ambient temperature, which is 22c (72F).

Hope this helps,

Comp :sol: 
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January 6, 2013 2:46:28 PM

EzioAs said:
Are those images taken at the same time?

Yes
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January 6, 2013 3:12:41 PM

CompuTronix said:
I used to write and maintain the Core i and Core 2 Temperature Guide here at Tom's from `06 thru `10. We went through this several years ago when the Q6600 was the processor of choice, and Intel wasn't yet forthcoming about Tjunction Max values.

You have the original B3 105 Watt version of the Q6600 which idles at 24 Watts, and was thought to have a Tjunction Max value of 85c. The later G0 95 Watt version idles at 16 Watts and has a Tjunction Max value of 100c, thus a 15c dicrepancy still exists between some temperature monitoring utilities. The Author of Real Temp sorted out the contoversy and coded this most popular and trusted temperature monitoring utility to the correct Tjunction Max values.

From the Introduction of my Guide:

"Core i and Core 2 processors have 2 different types of temperature sensors; a CPU case (not computer case) Thermal Diode centered under the Cores, and Digital Thermal Sensors (DTS) located on each Core. The case Thermal Diode measures Tcase (Temperature case), which is overall CPU temperature, and the Digital Thermal Sensors measure Tjunction (Temperature junction), which are individual Core temperatures. Since these sensors measure 2 distinct thermal levels, there is a 5c temperature difference between them, which is Tcase to Tjunction Gradient. Core i and Core 2 processors have 1 Tcase sensor, and an individual Tjunction sensor on each Core. Uncalibrated default temperatures are seldom accurate.

Intel provides complete specifications for Tcase (CPU temperature), but only partial specifications for Tjunction (Core temperature), which causes much confusion and debate in the overclocking community concerning test methods, temperature monitoring utilities and accuracy. The monitoring utilities provided by motherboard manufacturers monitor CPU temperature, while some popular freeware utilities monitor Core temperatures. The most accurate Core temperature monitoring utility available is Real Temp - http://www.techpowerup.com/realtemp/ - which has many unique and innovative features that include calibrations, and is recommended for users interested in monitoring Core temperatures."

Please download and run the following:

Real Temp 3.7 - http://www.techpowerup.com/realtemp/
CPU-Z 1.62- http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html
Prime95 27.7 - http://mersenne.org/

Run Prime95 on Small FFT's for 10 minutes. Intel's Thermal Specifications are complicated, but the simplified explanation is as this; Tcase Max, which is the value shown on Intel's Processor Spec Finder - http://ark.intel.com/products/29765/Intel-Core2-Quad-Pr... - is CPU temperature, NOT Core temperature. This is a very common misconception among most enthusiasts.

Idle temperatures are much less important than load temperatures, however, although you're running at stock clock with Intel's very poor stock cooler, your idle temperatures will be unusually elevated because your Q6600 B3 idles at 24 Watts. Nevertheless, when running Prime95 Small FFT's, which is a steady-sate 100% workload, Tcase Max or CPU temperature is the "do not exceed" value ... but since Core temperatures are 5c higher than CPU temperature, the maximum Core temperatures for your Q6600 B3 is 67c, while the Q6600 G0 version is 76c. Aslo, keep in mind that Intel conducts all thermal testing at 22c (72F) which is Standard Ambient temperature.

Hope this helps,

Comp :sol: 


Thanks for the explanation that did clear a lot of things for me, i dont want to run the prime95 tests since , my CPU got overheated once(i didnt seat the HSF properly) and my computer switched off itself due to the high temperature,
So when it comes to taking care of the stability of the processor i have to keep an eye on Tcase MAX temperature rite?
since that will tell me the case temperature in which the cores are contained?
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January 6, 2013 3:18:29 PM

And also one more thing distance to TJ max is the core temperature? and according to intel they havent specified any "do not exceed" limits for it. so from intels perspective i have to keep an eye on TCASE temperature rite? following is the reading on real temps seems like iam just few degrees below the maximum prescribed limited and yes mine is a B3 stepping processor. this screenshot was take when my proccy is around 16% load.

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January 6, 2013 3:47:25 PM

Real Temp reads Core temperatures, not CPU temperature. "Distance to TJ Max" is how many degrees to shutdown, which is not your Core temperatures. The numbers shown under "Temperature" are your Core temperatures, which are quite high for an 11% load, even at a warm Ambient temperature.

All you need to remember is that for a Q6600 B3, any Core temperatures above 67c should be considered "overtemp".

As your stock heatsinc has undoubtedly been in place for several years and the thermal compound has probably dried to a powder, you might want to remove the heatsinc, clean off the old compund and replace it with new thermal compound. This will ensure that your temperatures will run as low as possible. Also, removing the dust and a good cleaning, including fan blades, always helps.
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January 7, 2013 12:37:22 AM

CompuTronix said:
Real Temp reads Core temperatures, not CPU temperature. "Distance to TJ Max" is how many degrees to shutdown, which is not your Core temperatures. The numbers shown under "Temperature" are your Core temperatures, which are quite high for an 11% load, even at a warm Ambient temperature.

All you need to remember is that for a Q6600 B3, any Core temperatures above 67c should be considered "overtemp".

As your stock heatsinc has undoubtedly been in place for several years and the thermal compound has probably dried to a powder, you might want to remove the heatsinc, clean off the old compund and replace it with new thermal compound. This will ensure that your temperatures will run as low as possible. Also, removing the dust and a good cleaning, including fan blades, always helps.


Guess what i just did that couple of weeks back, Cleaned my HS thoroughly Applied Arctic cooling MX2 , further more this is a second hand processor which i bought very recently, it is already 4 years old :p  maybe i should change the heat sink? can you reccomend my some nice after market coolers which i can use even on latest processors, incase i upgrade.
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