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Whats the point in upgrading my GPU/Want to buy a new card

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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July 7, 2012 9:52:27 PM

First heres my specs for my machince:

i5 2.8Ghz
12GB RAM 1333
GTS 250 1GB
mobo = single GPU slot PCIe 2.0 ASUS


I recently found out that my Nvidia GTS 250 is basically a 9800GTX. Which I guess isn't bad....the card still runs many of the games out now at pretty good settings.

Anywho, I looked up some specs and my card now has anywhere from 675Mhz-750Mhz for speed. This is around twice as much as the previous card I had an AGP 7600 or something.

What I'm getting at is: I looked at some of the newer cards (the 500 series) and most of them are that much of a jump in speed. Even the RAM speed is sometimes LOWER. Sometimes the speed of some of the 400 series cards are lower in both.

So besides having DX11 support what would be the benefit. I mean, if the cards are doing DX11 features would they not need to be faster?

It also seems they don't have any cards like the one I have. Good RAM, good speed, good bit. Lots of the cards that I look at that aren't $600+ have ok MHZ, ok RAM.....but like 192 bit.

So what should I do?

a b U Graphics card
July 7, 2012 10:43:26 PM

ICN3D said:
First heres my specs for my machince:

i5 2.8Ghz
12GB RAM 1333
GTS 250 1GB
mobo = single GPU slot PCIe 2.0 ASUS


I recently found out that my Nvidia GTS 250 is basically a 9800GTX. Which I guess isn't bad....the card still runs many of the games out now at pretty good settings.

Anywho, I looked up some specs and my card now has anywhere from 675Mhz-750Mhz for speed. This is around twice as much as the previous card I had an AGP 7600 or something.

What I'm getting at is: I looked at some of the newer cards (the 500 series) and most of them are that much of a jump in speed. Even the RAM speed is sometimes LOWER. Sometimes the speed of some of the 400 series cards are lower in both.

So besides having DX11 support what would be the benefit. I mean, if the cards are doing DX11 features would they not need to be faster?

It also seems they don't have any cards like the one I have. Good RAM, good speed, good bit. Lots of the cards that I look at that aren't $600+ have ok MHZ, ok RAM.....but like 192 bit.

So what should I do?


Trust me the newer cards are MUCH faster than the card you have. They will give you more FPS at higher settings!

Go for the new 600 series of graphics cards!
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a c 260 U Graphics card
July 7, 2012 10:45:12 PM

The simple answer is to buy the best graphics card you feel comfortable paying for, and which your psu can power.

The gaming capability of a graphics card is a composite of many things. The archtecture, the clock speeds, the number of stream processors, the driver optimization amount of vram, etc... It does little good to buy on a particular spec.

But in general, you get the performance you pay for. It is a very competitive market, and all those factors are factored into the price/performance equation.

And... don't anguish over minor differences in price or features.
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a b U Graphics card
July 7, 2012 10:50:40 PM

geofelt said:
The simple answer is to buy the best graphics card you feel comfortable paying for, and which your psu can power.

The gaming capability of a graphics card is a composite of many things. The archtecture, the clock speeds, the number of stream processors, the driver optimization amount of vram, etc... It does little good to buy on a particular spec.

But in general, you get the performance you pay for. It is a very competitive market, and all those factors are factored into the price/performance equation.

And... don't anguish over minor differences in price or features.


+1
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a c 84 U Graphics card
July 7, 2012 10:53:44 PM

thats why you dont look at specs, but the performance....
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/GPU12/373
it doesnt list your card, but it should be somewhere between 8800gt and GTS450 (that is a bit of a gap though, but will give you some idea how much faster recent cards are)
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a c 84 U Graphics card
July 7, 2012 10:59:47 PM

take alook at these charts as well, the first one is older and has your card in it, take note how it performs relatively to gtx480, then find that 480 in the second chart with all the latest cards in it...

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a b U Graphics card
July 7, 2012 11:00:56 PM

Nothng is gonna change when consoles come out. They will 1.5-2 years behind the PC in terms of graphic capability. The only thing consoles have going for them is that making the games is easier cause they dont have to make it to run on 1 million different configurations just to make a profit on the PC.
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July 7, 2012 11:13:12 PM

vrumor said:
Nothng is gonna change when consoles come out. They will 1.5-2 years behind the PC in terms of graphic capability. The only thing consoles have going for them is that making the games is easier cause they dont have to make it to run on 1 million different configurations just to make a profit on the PC.



Here is my thinking. Tell me if I'm crazy.

I thought most games had patches for DX11 or had some choice to whether you could use DX9 or DX11.

I figured by the time the new consoles come out DX11 will be standard and it would be like the difference between DX9 Half Life 2 and DX9 Crysis.

I just don't want to get a card that is good for DX11 now and in a few months it's obsolete b/c devs started coming out with all sorts of new features for DX11.

Something to that extent.
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a b U Graphics card
July 7, 2012 11:25:23 PM

The new Unreal Engine 4 was run on a single 680, which means itll run on a 670 and 7970, 7950 pretty flawlessly. From what ive read, it seems most developers are disappointed with the new console specs. They are going to be using the equivalent of a 6770 in the Xbox I believe, not sure about the PS.
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July 7, 2012 11:29:33 PM

Thanks vrumor.....that makes me feel better.
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July 7, 2012 11:37:35 PM

There is basically two ways you can go with this situation. Either of which depends on what your motherboard supports.

Option 1: buy a hi-end graphics card

Option 2: buy two older cards and run them in SLi


Most folks will tell you to choose Option 1, buy the latest and greatest after all, doing so will keep you up to date with current technology but these cards will cost you quite a pretty penny. My recommendation is to choose option two. I recommend this because GPU's don't get better in leaps and bounds and frankly you will not SEE much difference between the latest and greatest GPU versus last years card. Plus paying 500 plus dollars for a card this year that will be 200 or less next year only makes good financial sence.

People will throw bench marks at you and say this and that but to be honest, the differences in performance are so neglagible you can't see them with the naked eye and therefor benchmarks to me are hogwash. If you do choose option two i would suggest looking at the geforce 500 series. I run two GeForce 550Ti with 2gig ram per card in SLi in my machine and I am able to play even the most extreme games in the highest setting which is pretty much what you will get with using only one of the latest and greatest cards. Plus when you run SLi, your computer takes advantage of both the cards and runs them as one, combines processing power and doubles the video memory. Crossfire is another alternative if your motherboard doesn't support SLi but i will stress that crossfire is not as good as SLi and the gains from crossfire are minute. Either way, last years cards are dropping in price and when you put two together ou get exceptional performance for the smaller price tag.
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July 8, 2012 6:50:14 AM

jhowle9475 said:
There is basically two ways you can go with this situation. Either of which depends on what your motherboard supports.

Option 1: buy a hi-end graphics card

Option 2: buy two older cards and run them in SLi


Most folks will tell you to choose Option 1, buy the latest and greatest after all, doing so will keep you up to date with current technology but these cards will cost you quite a pretty penny. My recommendation is to choose option two. I recommend this because GPU's don't get better in leaps and bounds and frankly you will not SEE much difference between the latest and greatest GPU versus last years card. Plus paying 500 plus dollars for a card this year that will be 200 or less next year only makes good financial sence.

People will throw bench marks at you and say this and that but to be honest, the differences in performance are so neglagible you can't see them with the naked eye and therefor benchmarks to me are hogwash. If you do choose option two i would suggest looking at the geforce 500 series. I run two GeForce 550Ti with 2gig ram per card in SLi in my machine and I am able to play even the most extreme games in the highest setting which is pretty much what you will get with using only one of the latest and greatest cards. Plus when you run SLi, your computer takes advantage of both the cards and runs them as one, combines processing power and doubles the video memory. Crossfire is another alternative if your motherboard doesn't support SLi but i will stress that crossfire is not as good as SLi and the gains from crossfire are minute. Either way, last years cards are dropping in price and when you put two together ou get exceptional performance for the smaller price tag.


I don't have a mobo that supports 2 GPUs. I only have 1 slot for a GPU. So I was looking at this card:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It's a dual single card. Geforce 460. Honestly, I don't want to spend too much and most of the negative ratings are from ppl saying that it's too expensive, but I'm willing to spend just that much for a decent GPU if it will play DX11 games well. Doesn't have to be at max but around 40fps or something. I don't use AA or whatever it's called now and I only play at 1600x900.

Like I said, I just want to play current games (DX11 or not) better than now. I want to save money and wait a while before I buy an expensive GPU that will play future DX11 games at full force.
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a b U Graphics card
July 8, 2012 12:39:59 PM

If you're willing to buy the GTX 460 2 Win...you might as well spend the extra $30 and get either a 7950 or GTX 670(Gigabyte is the better one of the $399 cards)

Either one of those will outperform the 460 2 win and use less juice/expel less heat in the process, without the issues of microstutter, waiting for SLI profiles, heat, noise.

Plus the dual gpu cards are known to be forgotten very quickly by both AMD/Nvidia so forget about proper support down the road.
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July 8, 2012 1:52:41 PM

i always use midrange gpu but on lower res, i found this way is always bang for the buck. for example 560ti @1680 = 580 @1920 so? why worry? i even use my 560ti @1440.. (19"). that way you can always jack that setting maxed, no worry of slowdown, always works for the job. and you can always sell your old gpu with better one on next year or two , just dont wait too long until it's absolute obsolete.
but.. that is my way, my preference.
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a c 84 U Graphics card
July 8, 2012 1:56:21 PM

ICN3D said:
No, the one I linked is. It's 2 460s in 1. Thats why it's sorta expensive.

oh, didn't notice that, my bad :D  i just quickly scanned the name and looked at the price and went 'woot thats nuts'
but i still wouldn't buy it, old is old... :lol: 
(and cliffro pointed out the other down sides already)

edit wasnt even aware that someone made dual460 cards, so didnt expect it...
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a c 260 U Graphics card
July 8, 2012 6:13:29 PM

ICN3D said:
Which one would you reccomend between these 2 cards

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

OR

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The second one is only $200. Really, I don't want to spend too much on this new card since everthing is going to change in about a year when the new consoles come out. Just look at that new Star Wars game.


Your links point to the same card. ???

I would avoid cf/sli if you can. Tead this on microstuttering:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

With a $300 budget for EVGA Nvidia cards, look for a GTX570. With $400, look for a GTX670. It is unlikely that you would need more.

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July 8, 2012 7:56:06 PM

you can get an EVGA Geforce 560ti that is factory over clocked with 2 gig ram for les money and get a new better card
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