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Fraps recording lag even with an ownage computer?

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July 10, 2012 6:03:03 PM

Hey, My PC Specs are as follows:

I7 960 @ Stock 3.2GHz

GTX 580 1.5GB

6GB 1666 Corsair RAM

1TB 7200 32MB Cache Drive (With OS on)
I tested this drive with ATTO Disk Benchmark and final score was 123.7MB Write and 125.4 Read

500GB 7200 16MB Cache (This drive is 100% clean and is used for fraps only, I have fraps installed on this drive and it records to this drive also)
I tested this drive with ATTO Disk Benchmark also and the final score was 78.1MB Write and 79.6MB Read

TX650 Corsair PSU

SATA 2 Mobo

Anyways, We have been recording in Half-Size on fraps settings with the 60 fps selection (We have tried other settings and 60 fps seems to be the best) When recording in Half-Size in games such as GTA 4 it seems fine to record, only slight difference when recording, But when you record in Full-Size (Which we want to record in so we can get maximum quality) It seems to lag and Warps/freezes/grainy and becomes unsmooth and sometimes fps drops and just makes it unplayable when recording in Full-Size. Completley depends on the game though, But most games I am unable to record in Full-Size. I dont like recording in Half-Size when I should be able to record Full-Size without a problem.

Note: My friend has an identical PC to me same specs and everything and gets the same issue i have.

I know a lot of you are gonna say "Use a different piece of recording software" No.. I know a guy that records full-size in WoW raids and doesnt lag but he records to a 5400 2TB Drive but has fraps installed on his OS Drive (SSD) I also know other people who record to second 7200 rpm drives for fraps but dont get this issue.

I was starting to think the problem is my second drive because it has such slow 70MB Odd write speed. Should I buy a new 64MB Cache 7200 drive? Will that fix the fault? Give your opinions please.

Thanks.






July 10, 2012 6:06:57 PM

Well to be honest I do not use fraps so I do not know how to fix the problem but if you are going to be getting a new hard drive you should just go with an SSD, they are really cheap right now if you get one with a rebate.
July 10, 2012 6:13:02 PM

coper210 said:
Well to be honest I do not use fraps so I do not know how to fix the problem but if you are going to be getting a new hard drive you should just go with an SSD, they are really cheap right now if you get one with a rebate.


I was thinking about this. But i'd only use it specifically for fraps, and i've done lots of research on them for fraps and apparently writing huge files like fraps does continuously can wear SSD's out quite quickly.
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July 10, 2012 6:13:35 PM

Honestly, I don't think it's your HDD write performance. When you record video, you're asking the CPU (or GPU, whichever the recording software uses) to encode that video while simultaneously rendering the game's graphics and AI. It puts extra strain on the system. Especially since you're trying for a higher-quality video, it's going to use more of your processing power.

Use any kind of CPU/GPU monitoring software to see what kind of load you're puting on your hardware with and without FRAPS. I suggest simply using Task Manager to monitor CPU, and your video card's manufacturer may have GPU monitoring software available. You may also do well to overclock that CPU a little bit, depending on cooling headroom ;) 
a b U Graphics card
July 10, 2012 6:13:37 PM

I was going to say the same to coper. What I do when I record in fraps (I also record WoW raids, see my specs below) is I record to my SSD, do any codec work or editing on my SSD, then move the final product to my storage HDD.
a b U Graphics card
July 10, 2012 6:13:39 PM

It's due to a bottleneck with the drive's write speeds, when recording full-sized the filesize is ridiculosly big and exceeds the HDD's write capacities. Writing to your main drive could help, and putting 2 or 3 of those in RAID 0 would alleviate it further. Same with an SSD (if recording to it), keep in mind though that performance will never be the same when recording, it'll always be somewhat slower or stuttery because it takes cpu cycles that would otherwised be used for the game, what can be avoided is the unplayability issues.
July 10, 2012 6:19:09 PM

leo2kp said:
Honestly, I don't think it's your HDD write performance. When you record video, you're asking the CPU (or GPU, whichever the recording software uses) to encode that video while simultaneously rendering the game's graphics and AI. It puts extra strain on the system. Especially since you're trying for a higher-quality video, it's going to use more of your processing power.

Use any kind of CPU/GPU monitoring software to see what kind of load you're puting on your hardware with and without FRAPS. I suggest simply using Task Manager to monitor CPU, and your video card's manufacturer may have GPU monitoring software available. You may also do well to overclock that CPU a little bit, depending on cooling headroom ;) 


I see where you're coming from but to be honest i highly doubt its GPU/CPU Related, My CPU/GPU highly exceeds the requirements for fraps, And people with lower specs than me seem to be able to record full-size much smoother than I do.
July 10, 2012 6:20:32 PM

wiinippongamer said:
It's due to a bottleneck with the drive's write speeds, when recording full-sized the filesize is ridiculosly big and exceeds the HDD's write capacities. Writing to your main drive could help, and putting 2 or 3 of those in RAID 0 would alleviate it further. Same with an SSD (if recording to it), keep in mind though that performance will never be the same when recording, it'll always be somewhat slower or stuttery because it takes cpu cycles that would otherwised be used for the game, what can be avoided is the unplayability issues.


wiinippongamer your such a troll lmfao I thought that was a real bug hahaha I was trying to blow it off the screen lololol

and you are right about the SSD writing, it can wear out the SSD's but the new technology in the SSD's these says are more durable and can handle a lot of writes. It is just the old ones that wear out quickly, just make sure you get a quality one.
July 10, 2012 6:20:57 PM

dalmvern said:
I was going to say the same to coper. What I do when I record in fraps (I also record WoW raids, see my specs below) is I record to my SSD, do any codec work or editing on my SSD, then move the final product to my storage HDD.


Do you have fraps specifically installed on an SSD and record to that SSD? Also do you get any lag at all when in Full-Size? How long have you been recording to that drive for? and which SSD is it?
a b U Graphics card
July 10, 2012 6:34:46 PM

aydee said:
Do you have fraps specifically installed on an SSD and record to that SSD? Also do you get any lag at all when in Full-Size? How long have you been recording to that drive for? and which SSD is it?


Fraps is installed and records to that SSD, it was an issued i had to deal with early on when I started using fraps. I cant say that I have really gotten any lag when recording in full and I have been doing it for just over a year now. My SSD is the OCZ Agility 2 and I wouldnt recommend it. Apparently I was one of the few lucky ones who has never had a problem with that model of SSD. I would probably recommend the Crucial m4, not only because its not Sandforce, but it seems to be more reliable and its newer so it has faster Read/write speeds.

Here is a YouTube video I posted when I was first playing around with fraps. Im pretty sure this was full size at 60 FPS. (Battlefield 3 obviously not WoW)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTivxFapNvA&feature=plcp
July 10, 2012 6:41:40 PM

Just to add in my 2 cents: SSD's are plenty durable. They can write 20GB of data per day and still last over a decade. SSD's got a bad rep for endurance in it's infancy.

If you do go the SSD route, I'd avoid SandForce SSD's. SandForce controllers rely on data compression, and they tend to take a huge performance hit with stuck with incompressable data. Based on articles I've read, media is typically incompressable data. Go with a Crucial M4. Very affordable and pretty good performance. No reliance on compression.

Also, FRAPS uses a specialized codec that's pretty light on the CPU cycles compared to other codecs, but the tradeoff is larger file sizes. It might be the drive, but I haven't exactly played around with minimally compressed/raw HD video. I would like to think 70MB/s is enough, but take that statement with a grain of salt.
July 10, 2012 6:42:27 PM

dalmvern said:
Fraps is installed and records to that SSD, it was an issued i had to deal with early on when I started using fraps. I cant say that I have really gotten any lag when recording in full and I have been doing it for just over a year now. My SSD is the OCZ Agility 2 and I wouldnt recommend it. Apparently I was one of the few lucky ones who has never had a problem with that model of SSD. I would probably recommend the Crucial m4, not only because its not Sandforce, but it seems to be more reliable and its newer so it has faster Read/write speeds.

Here is a YouTube video I posted when I was first playing around with fraps. Im pretty sure this was full size at 60 FPS. (Battlefield 3 obviously not WoW)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTivxFapNvA&feature=plcp


Quality looks insane, Has to be full size.
Sorry, What hard-drives do you have in your pc and which has your OS on. and which drive has fraps installed on?
Is your SSD specifically for fraps files only?
July 10, 2012 6:45:38 PM

jerm1027 said:
Just to add in my 2 cents: SSD's are plenty durable. They can write 20GB of data per day and still last over a decade. SSD's got a bad rep for endurance in it's infancy.

If you do go the SSD route, I'd avoid SandForce SSD's. SandForce controllers rely on data compression, and they tend to take a huge performance hit with stuck with incompressable data. Based on articles I've read, media is typically incompressable data. Go with a Crucial M4. Very affordable and pretty good performance. No reliance on compression.

Also, FRAPS uses a specialized codec that's pretty light on the CPU cycles compared to other codecs, but the tradeoff is larger file sizes. It might be the drive, but I haven't exactly played around with minimally compressed/raw HD video. I would like to think 70MB/s is enough, but take that statement with a grain of salt.


Last over 10 years? Whaaat?
Thing is though, Fraps in full size takes roughly 79GB for 25 Minutes of recording lol. Wouldnt that wear it out pretty damn quick if im recording for lets say an hour or two a day?
July 10, 2012 6:48:14 PM

jerm1027 said:
Just to add in my 2 cents: SSD's are plenty durable. They can write 20GB of data per day and still last over a decade. SSD's got a bad rep for endurance in it's infancy.

If you do go the SSD route, I'd avoid SandForce SSD's. SandForce controllers rely on data compression, and they tend to take a huge performance hit with stuck with incompressable data. Based on articles I've read, media is typically incompressable data. Go with a Crucial M4. Very affordable and pretty good performance. No reliance on compression.

Also, FRAPS uses a specialized codec that's pretty light on the CPU cycles compared to other codecs, but the tradeoff is larger file sizes. It might be the drive, but I haven't exactly played around with minimally compressed/raw HD video. I would like to think 70MB/s is enough, but take that statement with a grain of salt.


Crucial M4? Has a lower write speed, Wouldnt it be better to get an OCZ Vertex 3 or something?
a b U Graphics card
July 10, 2012 6:59:32 PM

aydee said:
Quality looks insane, Has to be full size.
Sorry, What hard-drives do you have in your pc and which has your OS on. and which drive has fraps installed on?
Is your SSD specifically for fraps files only?


I have 3 hard drives (although I only have one listed on the build in my signature) Two SSDs, both OCZ Agility 2 80 GB drives. One drive is my OS/boot drive with essential programs, the other is my dedicated recording drive for fraps. When im not doing any recording or editing, that drive has less than 1 GB of used space because it only has Fraps installed and maybe some random screen shots I took with fraps because I forget to clean out that folder as well, but when im done editing it gets moved to my data/storage drive, the Spinpoint. (I have this one partitioned 500GB data drive/500 GB storage drive) That way, my fraps SSD is always like new when im recording.
July 10, 2012 7:05:08 PM

dalmvern said:
I have 3 hard drives (although I only have one listed on the build in my signature) Two SSDs, both OCZ Agility 2 80 GB drives. One drive is my OS/boot drive with essential programs, the other is my dedicated recording drive for fraps. When im not doing any recording or editing, that drive has less than 1 GB of used space because it only has Fraps installed and maybe some random screen shots I took with fraps because I forget to clean out that folder as well, but when im done editing it gets moved to my data/storage drive, the Spinpoint. (I have this one partitioned 500GB data drive/500 GB storage drive) That way, my fraps SSD is always like new when im recording.


I see,

Do you get better recording preformance being that you have your games both on SSD's?

E.G. I play the game on my 1 TB but if i recorded to the SSD would my recording preformance be less than yours mainly because you've got 2 SSD's one with the game and the other for fraps? Quite hard to explain what i mean. Will you having 2 SSD's benefit you for fraps more than I would just having that one drive for fraps?
July 10, 2012 7:12:06 PM

aydee said:
Crucial M4? Has a lower write speed, Wouldnt it be better to get an OCZ Vertex 3 or something?

The 128GB version has a sustained write speed of 175MB/s. The 256GB is rated at 260MB/s. I'm not sure if that is accounting for firmware optimizations or not. If speed is of absolute highest priority, I'd just go for a Samsung 830 series. Not going to get much faster than that, besides maybe the Vertex 4. The Vertex 3 isn't that much faster than an M4 when it comes to incompressible sequential write speed.
a b U Graphics card
July 10, 2012 7:13:11 PM

No, all of my games are in the data portion of my partitioned 1TB drive. I read some articles and reviews about gaming and performance and it really didnt affect game performance at all.

As far as difference in recording...I cant really say. I have had my computer set up like this basically from when I first built it a year and a half ago.

If you didnt notice, I have my CPU overclocked to 4 GHz. Do you have yours overclocked at all? That could make a pretty big difference.
a b U Graphics card
July 10, 2012 7:14:00 PM

79gb for 25 mins is 189mb/s, that is 189mb the drive has to write every second, so the bottleneck here is obviously the drive's write speed.

You'd need a big ass SSD to record 1 hour of footage like that, so the best thing to do would be to get a couple of newer, faster 500gb(or 1tb) drives and run them in raid 0, which should easily exceed 200mb/s writes and *should* solve your problem.
a b U Graphics card
July 10, 2012 7:15:20 PM

Two of the same of your main drives should hit 250mb/s writes.
July 10, 2012 7:32:55 PM

wiinippongamer said:
79gb for 25 mins is 189mb/s, that is 189mb the drive has to write every second, so the bottleneck here is obviously the drive's write speed.

You'd need a big ass SSD to record 1 hour of footage like that, so the best thing to do would be to get a couple of newer, faster 500gb(or 1tb) drives and run them in raid 0, which should easily exceed 200mb/s writes and *should* solve your problem.


Couldn't I just buy a 120GB SSD, record fraps files to that drive, when its full, transfer it over to the 500GB storage drive?
Will the SATA 3 OCZ Vertex 3 or 4 acheive over 250MB Write speed on sata 2 speeds?
a b U Graphics card
July 10, 2012 7:47:57 PM

wiinippongamer said:
79gb for 25 mins is 189mb/s, that is 189mb the drive has to write every second, so the bottleneck here is obviously the drive's write speed.

You'd need a big ass SSD to record 1 hour of footage like that, so the best thing to do would be to get a couple of newer, faster 500gb(or 1tb) drives and run them in raid 0, which should easily exceed 200mb/s writes and *should* solve your problem.



I dont think that is an issue in this case, it surely was not in my case. Like I said before I have an 80 GB SSD, but nobody records an entire raid. You record fights, which last from 3 minutes to 20 at most. I have never filled up my 80 GB SSD since I have been recording raids with Fraps.

On a different note, you dont want to fill up your SSD. The higher percentage of disk useage, the slower the performance gets. At least that is how it works with the old Sandforce drives like mine. I am not sure if that is the case with the newer SSDs. Either way, what you would want to do is record, post-process, move. If your SSD usage gets too far over 50% you will start seeing a drop in transfer speed, but honestly, any SSD you buy will be better and faster than mine, so I wouldnt think you would have any problems.
a b U Graphics card
July 10, 2012 8:24:26 PM

aydee said:
Couldn't I just buy a 120GB SSD, record fraps files to that drive, when its full, transfer it over to the 500GB storage drive?


Yes, but it'd be more of a hassle, it's up to personal preference.
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