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Will I need a new PSU?

Last response: in Components
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January 13, 2013 2:55:44 PM

Hi, First of all, here's my current specs, copy and pasted from Speccy.

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit SP1
CPU
Intel Core i5 3550 @ 3.30GHz 37 °C
Ivy Bridge 22nm Technology
RAM
8.00 GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 798MHz (11-11-11-30)
Motherboard
Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd. H61MA-D2V (Intel Core i3-3220 CPU @ 3.30GHz) 28 °C
Graphics
Generic Non-PnP Monitor (1280x800@60Hz)
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650

Simple question, I plan on upgrading to an Intel Core i7 3770K Quad Core Ivy Bridge in a couple of months. Will I need a new power supply? If so, what will I need? I'm not the best with hardware and I had my friend build my PC for me so this will essentially be the first time I've replaced a component aside from adding RAM sticks.

My current PSU is 450W.

Thank you.

More about : psu

a b ) Power supply
January 13, 2013 3:03:00 PM

since when did ram run at 798mhz?

no point of upgrading to a i7 unless you are doing a lot of video rendering. you wont see jack of a difference in gaming

if you want to put a i7 in that rig you must replace the motherboard as well. h61 wont overclock. plus,
a c 137 ) Power supply
January 13, 2013 3:11:14 PM

Your post is a bit confusing.
Do you currently have a i5-3550 or a i3-3320 cpu installed?

To answer your question: No, your psu is sufficient.
The CPU takes relatively little psu power.

Only if your psu is a poor quality brand would you want to change it out.

But, your cpu upgrade may not be the best.

The 3770K is sold at a price premium over a 3770, and is intended to be overclocked.
Unfortunately, your H61 based motherboard will not let you use the capabilities of the "K" to be overclocked.
A 3770 would be better.

Then, If your main purpose is gaming, the 3770K or 3770 will not be any better for gaming, and a stronger graphics card(and psu) would be more effective.

If your purpose is rendering or other cpu bound and multi thread enabled apps, then a i7, either 3770 or 3770K would be fine.
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January 13, 2013 3:16:05 PM

My current CPU is an i3. Alright, yeah, My main purpose will be gaming so thanks for that advice. How far do you think my current CPU and GPU have me future-proofed for?
January 13, 2013 3:21:37 PM

Also, I was thinking of upgrading my RAM to 16GB? I understand it's functionally pointless but I have little else to spend my money on at the moment. Will I need to replace my mobo? I've always imagined replacing a mobo as a huge pain.
a c 137 ) Power supply
January 13, 2013 3:23:07 PM

Suox said:
My current CPU is an i3. Alright, yeah, My main purpose will be gaming so thanks for that advice. How far do you think my current CPU and GPU have me future-proofed for?

There is no such thing in computing as "future proofing"
Your i3-3320 is fine cpu for most games.
You are good until you want more fps and you have the budget for an upgrade.
It is not clear if the upgrade might be cpu or gpu.
To help clarify your options, run these two tests:

a) Run your games, but lower your resolution and eye candy.
If your FPS increases, it indicates that your cpu is strong enough to drive a better graphics configuration.
If your FPS stays the same, you are likely cpu limited.

b) Limit your cpu, either by reducing the OC, or, in windows power management, limit the maximum cpu% to something like 50%.
This will simulate what a lack of cpu power will do.


Go to control panel/power options/change plan settings/change advanced power settings/processor power management/maximum processor state/
set to 50% and see how you do.


If your FPS drops significantly, it is an indicator that your cpu is the limiting factor, and a cpu upgrade is in order.

It is possible that both tests are positive, indicating that you have a well balanced system, and both cpu and gpu need to be upgraded to get better gaming FPS.
January 13, 2013 3:25:02 PM

geofelt said:
There is no such thing in computing as "future proofing"
Your i3-3320 is fine cpu for most games.
You are good until you want more fps and you have the budget for an upgrade.
It is not clear if the upgrade might be cpu or gpu.
To help clarify your options, run these two tests:

a) Run your games, but lower your resolution and eye candy.
If your FPS increases, it indicates that your cpu is strong enough to drive a better graphics configuration.
If your FPS stays the same, you are likely cpu limited.

b) Limit your cpu, either by reducing the OC, or, in windows power management, limit the maximum cpu% to something like 50%.
This will simulate what a lack of cpu power will do.


Go to control panel/power options/change plan settings/change advanced power settings/processor power management/maximum processor state/
set to 50% and see how you do.


If your FPS drops significantly, it is an indicator that your cpu is the limiting factor, and a cpu upgrade is in order.

It is possible that both tests are positive, indicating that you have a well balanced system, and both cpu and gpu need to be upgraded to get better gaming FPS.


Alright, thank you, I'll look into everything you suggested.

I suppose this thread is solved now.
a c 137 ) Power supply
January 13, 2013 3:45:14 PM

Suox said:
Also, I was thinking of upgrading my RAM to 16GB? I understand it's functionally pointless but I have little else to spend my money on at the moment. Will I need to replace my mobo? I've always imagined replacing a mobo as a huge pain.

It is nice to have money to spend:) 

No game, by itself will use more than 2-3gb, so more than 8gb is pointless. For a new build, I would, but as a replacement, no.

Actually, changing out a motherboard and cpu has been very easy in the 4 times I have done it, even with changing the chipset and cpu.

Once you have changed out the motherboard and cpu, just boot into windows, it has dine it every time for me. You will have reduced functionality until you can install the drivers that come with your new motherboard.

You will have to reactivate windows.
That is no issue if the os is upgrade or retail.

If it is oem which is legally tied to a motherboard, you may have a problem, but Microsoft seems to be quite lenient on this if you assure them that the copy of the os is being used on only this one pc. It is worth a try.
!