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GTX 670 on a 460w PSU?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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July 16, 2012 2:26:38 PM

I'm considering purchasing a GTX 670, however I'm wondering if my 460w PSU can handle it?

I own a pre-built Dell XPS 8500 with these specs:

3rd Gen Intel Core i7 - 3770 (3.4 GHz with Turbo Boost to 3.9 GHz)
8GB Dual Channel DDR3 1600MHz - 2 DIMMs
1TB 7200 RPM SATA Hard Drive 6.0 Gb/s
Intel H77 motherboard PCI Express 2.0
16X DVD+/-RW
Dell Wireless 1703 802.11b/g/n, Bluetooth v4.0+LE

These are the specs for the PSU:
100-240V
50-60Hz, 8A
+12VA 18A
+12VC 8A
+5V 25A
+5Vaux 3.0A
+12VB 16A
+3.3V 17A
-12V .3A
+5V and +3.3V shall not exceed 142W
+12VA, +12VB and +12VC shall not exceed 385W


Now, I know that my PSU contains two 6 pin power connectors, and Dell advertises that it can run anything 225w<, however, I highly doubt it can power anything like that without problems. Since the GTX 670 uses the same power as the 560ti, I'm just wondering if I could run it.



More about : gtx 670 460w psu

a b U Graphics card
July 16, 2012 3:59:09 PM

nope dont do it, nothing less than 40 amps for a single 670!
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July 16, 2012 7:36:40 PM

Are you sure? I'm pretty certain that my PSU can pull off the power since the 3770 has like an 80w tdp...
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a b U Graphics card
July 16, 2012 7:58:03 PM

You're better off getting a new PSU. You can always try it, but is it really worth risking?

Also, you don't need to buy some badass 850/750w PSU.

A really good 500W or a decent 600W would be plenty.

Check out guru3d power consumption analysis - http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforce-gtx-670-review/8
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a c 106 U Graphics card
July 16, 2012 8:05:40 PM

You could, and with a minimal configuration it should be fine, but I wouldn't.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-670-rev...

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5818/nvidia-geforce-gtx-6...

As you listed your system you shouldn't go much over 300W while gaming assuming you don't overclock anything. Factors like heat and added USB devices will affect your power consumption of course.

The reasons I wouldn't are simply that I like to keep my PSUs for along time, and like anything running closer towards it's rated limit (and usually hotter) will shorten it's life. That just depends on how long you want to keep the system. As for the quality of the PSU Dell generally uses the good stuff in its XPS line so that's not so much of a concern, as long as you don't overclock it. Well it's not like you can overclock the CPU anyways :p 
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July 16, 2012 8:20:31 PM

It should work but don't try to run unpatched Starcraft 2 :)  ... or some "burn-in" tools that will max both cpu and gpu.

As long as you use the computer normally ( no overclock or extreme testing ), you shouldn't have any problems.

However, make sure there's lots of fresh air around that PSU, because it will get quite warm during gaming sessions (it's usage level will sometime hit 80-100% )

Also it probably won't last very long under such loads, so while it will work for now, think about changing it as soon as possible.
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a c 117 U Graphics card
July 16, 2012 8:36:45 PM

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 Review Feat. EVGA: Bringing GK104 Down To $400
CPU: Intel Core i7-3960X @ 4.3GHz
Hard Disk: Samsung 470 (256GB)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3-1867 4 x 4GB (8-10-9-26)
EVGA GTX 670SC 1.175v 1066MHz


putting all that load on the 12 volt rail (even though it all won't):
317/385=82.33766%
also consider that i7 is 60(?)watts more . . .

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July 16, 2012 8:39:09 PM

No that's a terrible idea you need at least a 550w and I would suggest more than that.
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July 16, 2012 9:33:43 PM

So, we're sort of going back and forth here... Is there a direct answer like; yes or no?

Dell features a 7870 in the higher-end model of my computer, and that actually uses more power than the GTX 670. That's sort of why I'm wondering.
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July 16, 2012 9:38:59 PM

You should probably find a better PSU.

Click here and scroll down to the 550-650 range. You can find some really nice deals. They really don't cost that much.
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July 16, 2012 10:02:27 PM

Boxed computers rarely have a PSU powerful enough to move high end video cards, my suggestion is to get a reputable brand PSU with enough Amps on the 12 volt rail
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a b U Graphics card
July 16, 2012 10:18:44 PM

ausert said:
So, we're sort of going back and forth here... Is there a direct answer like; yes or no?

Dell features a 7870 in the higher-end model of my computer, and that actually uses more power than the GTX 670. That's sort of why I'm wondering.


But it probably comes with an upgraded PSU with more wattage.

Honestly, spend the $50-60 on a new PSU, it's safer, and you won't regret it.
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a b U Graphics card
July 16, 2012 10:44:02 PM

Never a good idea to use prebuillt power supplies. They are for the most part trash and don't reach their listed amperage/wattage so you could potentially fry your system and its components.

Buy $400 gpu

fry in 2 days with $20 psu

Rebuy $400 gpu and whatever else fried in the system takedown. E.G. new system. I.E. that $400 price total has just become +$1000
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July 16, 2012 11:17:33 PM

Guess I'll invest in a new PSU. Thanks guys.
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July 16, 2012 11:17:43 PM

Best answer selected by Ausert.
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