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My 1st Build Input Needed

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September 4, 2012 4:18:32 PM

Hello All,

This is my first build and I am hoping everything looks good. The system is going to be for gaming and minimal video editing...

Thanks for taking a look and giving any input that you think is needed

http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/PublicWishDetail.aspx...


If you feel that any parts are mismatched or money could be spent better elsewhere let me know.

I am not expierenced with builds and just some small tids:

I prefer Intel and Nvidia.
The case i choose because it opens on both sides and will help with my "Newb" cable managment.

Thought of doing SSD for OS but $1200 was my limit and this build is just a little of it and I can just do it and deal with the wife later :o 

Thanks for taking a look!

More about : 1st build input needed

September 4, 2012 4:27:40 PM

Looks good. As Far as gaming on it, you should be fine to run any of the current / upcoming games. This is not needed, but you should invest in a SSD to install your OS on. This will make windows a lot faster. Also install your favorite games to the SSD to make them run faster, and any other games to the HDD. Video Editing will run great with the any i7 and that 660Ti , hope your build goes great and your rig is TANK!
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September 4, 2012 4:49:25 PM

TeeKon said:
Hello All,

This is my first build and I am hoping everything looks good. The system is going to be for gaming and minimal video editing...

Thanks for taking a look and giving any input that you think is needed

http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/PublicWishDetail.aspx...


If you feel that any parts are mismatched or money could be spent better elsewhere let me know.

I am not expierenced with builds and just some small tids:

I prefer Intel and Nvidia.
The case i choose because it opens on both sides and will help with my "Newb" cable managment.

Thought of doing SSD for OS but $1200 was my limit and this build is just a little of it and I can just do it and deal with the wife later :o 

Thanks for taking a look!

Couple of thoughts.
Do you really need i7. i7 can be useful, in video editing (assuming you are using software that can actually use hyperthreading), but the gains, over i5, are small, for the "hobbyist". Definately justified for professional work, marginal otherwise.
I note you've selected the i7-3770. You can't overclock that. Assuming that's not an oversight, and you don't WANT to overclock, the Z77 mobo is a bit of a waste. The cheaper H77 mobo will give identical performance, cheaper. Just not overclocking.
Unless you are planning to add a 2nd graphics card, in SLi, the power supply, whilst excellent quality, is more powerful, than you need. 500W would be adequate. 600W would give you a bit in hand, and a good choice. Don't skimp on quality, though!
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September 4, 2012 5:28:00 PM

What you listed is compatible, and will work.
But, I think you can do better.

1) Few games use more than 2-3 cores, making the hyperthreads on the 3770 useless. A 3570K will be cheaper and stronger. It is as good as it gets for gaming.
Go ahead and spend a few extra bucks on the "K". The "k" allows you to increase the multiplier from 34 to 40-44 easily.
You may not do this initially, but I would preserve that option. If you live near a microcenter, they will sell you a 3570K for $190.

2) The GTX660ti is a very nice card, and I like EVGA coolers. With your budget, take the $ saved from the 3770 and apply it to a GTX670 if you wish.

3) I would include an aftermarket cpu cooler such as the $30 cm hyper212. The larger 120mm fan will keep your cpu cooler, and be quieter. If you OC, you can go higher with better cooling. And... for the first time builder, you will find that the backplate mount is much easier than the stock Intel pushpins.

4) A build with your budget should include a SSD for the os and some apps.
It really makes everything you do feel so much quicker.
I would use a 120gb or 180gb Intel 330 ssd. Or, if it is cheaper, a Samsung 830 ssd. They are the most trouble free units.
120gb will hold the os and half a dozen games. You might even defer the hard drive purchace to later. Hard drive prices are still higher than usual.

5) Buy a low profile ram kit. 1.5v ram does not even need any heat spreaders which are mostly marketing.
Tall heat spreaders may interfere with some coolers. Also, there is little need for any ram faster than 1600. Read this:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/4503/sandy-bridge-memory-...

6) The motherboard is fine. Actually, any Z77 based motherboard will do the job.

7) The Seasonic X750 is one great psu. But, modern GTX6.. series graphics cards do not need more than 550w.
If you are thinking of planning for sli, please rethink.
Here is my canned rant on that:
Dual graphics cards vs. a good single card.

a) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX560 or 6870 can give you great performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX560ti or 6950 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single 7970 or GTX680 is about as good as it gets.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, then sli/cf will be needed.
Even that is now changing with triple monitor support on top end cards.

b) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX560ti needs a 450w psu, even a GTX580 only needs a 600w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 150-200w to your psu requirements.
A single more modern 28nm card like a 7970 or GTX680 needs only 550W.
Even the strongest GTX690 only needs 650w.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

c) Dual cards do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

d) dual card support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.

e) cf/sli up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.

8) The case looks good, and cases are a personal preference. Buy what you love. But, from a functional point of view, you can get a case to hold your parts and have adequate ventilation for half the cost. Do not exclude a M-ATX motherboard and a smaller case.

9) As to advice, take the time now to download and read, cover to cover, the motherboard and case manuals. Many questions will be answered.
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September 4, 2012 5:29:13 PM

That PSU is a great choice but it is way expensive. You could drop that and get something like the PCPAC Silencer series and pay $100 for it. And then drop the 3770 to the 3570K and upgrade your GPU to the GTX 670. Also it's never a good idea to purchase the Corsair Vengeance RAM with the tall heat sinks.

Try something like this for $1200:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($114.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($46.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($88.98 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($407.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($21.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1235.87
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-04 13:31 EDT-0400)

Actually a bit less. But everything checks out.
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September 4, 2012 7:40:14 PM

First off thanks to everyone for there input.

1) That is common on all replies change the CPU (CHECK)

2) Graphics card move up with the monies differnce ( took advise but decided to stay with 660 due to feedback I see around the net about the cards I think hope it works :ouch:  lol)

3) The ram I am concerned about is if I do go with an aftermarket heatsinkfan is the clearance issues.....Any input or proper way to guestimate the gap? * Made the Change of RAM In the list...

4) Added aftermarket CPU COOLER

5) SSD is wanted but we are pushing wifey limits I think I can go with an SSD and then wipe this HD and use it that is always a choice right?

****WISH LIST UPDATED*****
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September 4, 2012 7:56:23 PM

TeeKon said:
First off thanks to everyone for there input.

1) That is common on all replies change the CPU (CHECK)

2) Graphics card move up with the monies differnce (CHECK)


The ram I am concerned about is if I do go with an aftermarket heatsinkfan is the clearance issues.....Any input or proper way to guestimate the gap?


Some aftermarket coolers are quite large, and can have clearance issues.
Regardless, something like this G.skil ram with low profile heat spreaders will not be an issue:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Or, if you prefer Corsair, here is a kit from them:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This cm hyper212 would be a good cooler for $30:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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