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Gaming PC. (First time build)

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September 4, 2012 5:42:53 PM

Approximate purchase: 1-2 weeks

Budget: $5000 tops

Usage: Primarily gaming (Battlefield 3, Crysis 2, ETC.), but I would like it to pretty much be able to handle anything I could think to throw at it.

OS needed: Yes

Location: U.S.

Preferred Websites: Newegg, Amazon, Tigerdirect.. Not really to picky though.

Preferred parts: Intel, Nvidia, EVGA. Again not overly picky

Overclocking: Maybe at some point.

SLI or Crossfire: Sure

Well this is my first post here, but I have been looking around and everyone seems pretty knowledgeable, so I figured this is the place to ask about building a gaming PC.

I am setting the budget a little high because I am needing a monitor, I am thinking a 30" but if the budget doesn't allow me to game at that resolution, with relatively good FPS (60ish), than I am not opposed to going smaller with it.

Thanks in advance for your help.

More about : gaming time build

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a c 287 4 Gaming
September 4, 2012 5:56:56 PM

$5K???? Seems a bit excessive. You could put $1600 into the PC itself, a nice Samsung 55" LED edge-to-edge monitor, and then come out about $1500 ahead.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($198.49 @ Newegg)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($46.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($88.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($407.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Switch 810 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($179.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHES212-08 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1617.37
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-04 13:56 EDT-0400)
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September 4, 2012 6:58:26 PM

g-unit1111 said:
$5K???? Seems a bit excessive. You could put $1600 into the PC itself, a nice Samsung 55" LED edge-to-edge monitor, and then come out about $1500 ahead.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($198.49 @ Newegg)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($46.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($88.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($407.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Switch 810 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($179.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHES212-08 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1617.37
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-04 13:56 EDT-0400)




Yea I figured it would be a bit excessive, I just wanted to make sure to have all my bases covered, and not try to limit what I could build to much.
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September 4, 2012 7:00:50 PM

g-unit1111 said:
$5K???? Seems a bit excessive. You could put $1600 into the PC itself, a nice Samsung 55" LED edge-to-edge monitor, and then come out about $1500 ahead.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($198.49 @ Newegg)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($46.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($88.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($407.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Switch 810 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($179.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHES212-08 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1617.37
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-04 13:56 EDT-0400)



I like this build, however operating on a 5k budget I would:
-Bump CPU up a notch or two.
-Get a 256gb SSD. 128 is to small unless you are budget constrained.

As a matter of personal preference, I'd suggest consideration of a gold or platinum PSU and possibly 16gb of more expensive memory. (yes I know these things aren't necessary - but if you have $5k to burn they will offer some marginal benefit)
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September 4, 2012 9:48:52 PM

Thanks for your replies.

As far as longevity goes, do you think this would be good for like at least a yr or two without any major upgrades?

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a c 287 4 Gaming
September 4, 2012 9:56:47 PM

deadlockedworld said:
I like this build, however operating on a 5k budget I would:
-Bump CPU up a notch or two.
-Get a 256gb SSD. 128 is to small unless you are budget constrained.

As a matter of personal preference, I'd suggest consideration of a gold or platinum PSU and possibly 16gb of more expensive memory. (yes I know these things aren't necessary - but if you have $5k to burn they will offer some marginal benefit)


CPU: Not needed. On a gaming rig you won't use the i7-3770K or i7-3930K to their full extent. It makes no sense to spend that kind of money when you don't have to.

256GB SSD: Also not a necessity. That's what the 2TB hard drive is for.

16GB of RAM is also not needed, and a PSU higher than 750W you won't benefit from unless you add a second or third video card. That's where I would rather see the extra money go, but you'd also need a serious cooling configuration for that.

Quote:
As far as longevity goes, do you think this would be good for like at least a yr or two without any major upgrades?


More like 3 or 4. Longevity is a huge factor in the parts I pick.
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September 4, 2012 11:59:33 PM

G-Unit: For the record, I was very clear in my statement that the addition upgrades were not required, but simply an option for a user with a higher budget threshold. Many people here choose to buy more than what is needed.

The SSD I do take issue with. From my personal experience, 128gb is sufficient for a budget user that's willing to put some programs on the secondary drive and shuffle program files. Someone that actually has the money to spend and wants to keep most of their programs on the main drive should spend more and get a larger drive.

Good thing you didn't challenge my PSU thought. That would have been war. I love my Seasonic. ;)  (The one listed is a great deal for the quality though)


Jay: I'd agree with the 3-4 year assessment.

Also, if you would like additional suggestions on brands or models of case, psu, etc let us know. There are obviously lots of options in all of these areas.
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September 5, 2012 12:14:50 AM

g-unit1111 said:
$5K???? Seems a bit excessive. You could put $1600 into the PC itself, a nice Samsung 55" LED edge-to-edge monitor, and then come out about $1500 ahead.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($198.49 @ Newegg)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($46.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($88.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($407.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Switch 810 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($179.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHES212-08 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1617.37
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-04 13:56 EDT-0400)



i wud get a 690 instead bro
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September 5, 2012 12:19:41 AM

Well I am kind of curious on expandability of this setup. Like for example if I need a little more power or something, could I just add another 670? And if so would I need to upgrade any cooling or the psu or what? And lastly I am curious as to the advantages/disadvantages of even possibly switching the 670 with a 680.

Also sorry for the nooby questions lol.
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September 5, 2012 1:43:54 AM

Gimme a second.
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September 5, 2012 1:49:05 AM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($209.99 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright Silver Arrow CPU Cooler ($69.70 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Gigabyte G1.Sniper 3 EATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($280.01 @ Newegg)
Memory: Samsung 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($44.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($209.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (3-Way SLI) ($429.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (3-Way SLI) ($429.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (3-Way SLI) ($429.99 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Phantom (Black) ATX Full Tower Case ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 1050W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($170.00 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $2604.59
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-04 21:52 EDT-0400)

I got you half way.

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September 5, 2012 2:16:33 AM

jaytk said:
Well I am kind of curious on expandability of this setup. Like for example if I need a little more power or something, could I just add another 670? And if so would I need to upgrade any cooling or the psu or what? And lastly I am curious as to the advantages/disadvantages of even possibly switching the 670 with a 680.


Yes exactly - you can just get another card. As long as you have a decent motherboard and power supply you can always add cards later. The two builds here both have healthy safety margins on wattage - 750w could really handle 3 cards and 1000w could honestly handle 4. The extra margin is good for efficiency, heat, etc.

I wouldn't recommend that you start with triple SLI - only get that if you find you need it.
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September 5, 2012 2:43:41 AM

Hmm on the cases between the two builds what is it that causes the price difference? Also between the two coolers, which would be better? Lastly the mobos, between the two which is better? I have heard pretty good things about the Z77 boards.

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September 5, 2012 3:05:15 AM

You want a bigger case with lots of ventilation in order to hold the big video cards and dissipate heat. There are lots of good cases, it also depends on your asthetic taste. There are lots of reviews online.

Some have better ventilation, some are made out of higher quality materials than others. The two builds above used NZXT cases, but I'm personally partial to Silverstone and Corsair brand cases.

In case you are curious I have this one - its on the higher price end: http://www.anandtech.com/show/4620/silverstone-fortress...

I'll leave the mobo discussion for someone else that knows more about them.
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September 5, 2012 4:11:39 AM

deadlockedworld said:
You want a bigger case with lots of ventilation in order to hold the big video cards and dissipate heat. There are lots of good cases, it also depends on your asthetic taste. There are lots of reviews online.

Some have better ventilation, some are made out of higher quality materials than others. The two builds above used NZXT cases, but I'm personally partial to Silverstone and Corsair brand cases.

In case you are curious I have this one - its on the higher price end: http://www.anandtech.com/show/4620/silverstone-fortress...

I'll leave the mobo discussion for someone else that knows more about them.


I really love that case, I was aiming for a black case, and I love the kind of simplistic design of it. As for the GPUs I fnd myself drooling over that 3-way SLI, but I think I will prolly just go with 2-way and kinda meet in the middle of the two options hahah.

So here are the parts I am thinking so far:


http://pcpartpicker.com/p/gB0y

So how is that looking so far? It's a pretty good mix of the two builds posted so far each with the parts I would prefer between them. I am still open to suggestions on the parts of course.
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a c 287 4 Gaming
September 5, 2012 6:22:53 AM

guerrero said:
i wud get a 690 instead bro


Why when you can get dual 670s and they not only give you identical performance but you save $200? :heink: 

Quote:
G-Unit: For the record, I was very clear in my statement that the addition upgrades were not required, but simply an option for a user with a higher budget threshold. Many people here choose to buy more than what is needed.


Point taken. I just don't think people should spend money when they don't have to.

Quote:
The SSD I do take issue with. From my personal experience, 128gb is sufficient for a budget user that's willing to put some programs on the secondary drive and shuffle program files. Someone that actually has the money to spend and wants to keep most of their programs on the main drive should spend more and get a larger drive.


Storage needs vary from user to user - I personally would store the games and everything else on the secondary. That's the way I've always done it and that's the way it works for me, so I stick with it. SSDs have dropped dramatically in price since I started posting here - I got the 128GB Samsung 830 a month ago for $99 - that's unreal. I still maintain that anything above 256GB isn't worth the cost per GB, but do what you like. It's your money, not mine. :lol: 

Quote:
So how is that looking so far? It's a pretty good mix of the two builds posted so far each with the parts I would prefer between them. I am still open to suggestions on the parts of course.


1050W is *WAY* overkill for any build unless you're running triple SLI but you most likely won't. Go with a 750W or 850W, but there really isn't any need to get more than that for now.
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September 5, 2012 1:30:32 PM

I pretty much agree with the above. Newegg has the 850w version of the Seasonic Gold power supply that would be a great choice. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Also, if you do decide to go with an FT02 and SLI you might consider blower-style GPUs so that they exhaust out of the top. The 90 degree case should make that style work a little better than normal. (Do note, however, that this case is a little harder to work with than a more traditional option like the Corsair obsidian series because its unusual)

Edit: also note there are multiple FT02 models (the ones with W have a window).
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September 5, 2012 5:16:43 PM

deadlockedworld said:
I pretty much agree with the above. Newegg has the 850w version of the Seasonic Gold power supply that would be a great choice. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Also, if you do decide to go with an FT02 and SLI you might consider blower-style GPUs so that they exhaust out of the top. The 90 degree case should make that style work a little better than normal. (Do note, however, that this case is a little harder to work with than a more traditional option like the Corsair obsidian series because its unusual)

Edit: also note there are multiple FT02 models (the ones with W have a window).


Hmmm. If they are a little bit difficult to work with then I might go with the Corsair obsidian cases, as they have the same general style that I am looking for, and easier would be best for my first build. Furthermore, would getting a full tower case also be a little easier to work with since it would give me more room than a mid tower case?

Again thanks for your replies.
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a b 4 Gaming
September 5, 2012 5:55:56 PM

The Obsidian cases are just as roomy as Full Towers.
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September 5, 2012 6:21:52 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Why when you can get dual 670s and they not only give you identical performance but you save $200? :heink: 

Quote:
G-Unit: For the record, I was very clear in my statement that the addition upgrades were not required, but simply an option for a user with a higher budget threshold. Many people here choose to buy more than what is needed.


Point taken. I just don't think people should spend money when they don't have to.

Quote:
The SSD I do take issue with. From my personal experience, 128gb is sufficient for a budget user that's willing to put some programs on the secondary drive and shuffle program files. Someone that actually has the money to spend and wants to keep most of their programs on the main drive should spend more and get a larger drive.


Storage needs vary from user to user - I personally would store the games and everything else on the secondary. That's the way I've always done it and that's the way it works for me, so I stick with it. SSDs have dropped dramatically in price since I started posting here - I got the 128GB Samsung 830 a month ago for $99 - that's unreal. I still maintain that anything above 256GB isn't worth the cost per GB, but do what you like. It's your money, not mine. :lol: 

Quote:
So how is that looking so far? It's a pretty good mix of the two builds posted so far each with the parts I would prefer between them. I am still open to suggestions on the parts of course.


1050W is *WAY* overkill for any build unless you're running triple SLI but you most likely won't. Go with a 750W or 850W, but there really isn't any need to get more than that for now.


cuz he spendin $5000
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a c 287 4 Gaming
September 5, 2012 6:23:24 PM

guerrero said:
cuz he spendin $5000


Just because he's spending $5,000 doesn't mean he has to hit the whole budget, that's not a good way to go about doing things.
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September 5, 2012 6:24:24 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Just because he's spending $5,000 doesn't mean he has to hit the whole budget, that's not a good way to go about doing things.


1 card is always better then 2 - People here
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September 5, 2012 11:30:27 PM

jaytk said:
Hmmm. If they are a little bit difficult to work with then I might go with the Corsair obsidian cases, as they have the same general style that I am looking for, and easier would be best for my first build. Furthermore, would getting a full tower case also be a little easier to work with since it would give me more room than a mid tower case?

Again thanks for your replies.


You definitely want a larger, ventilated case if you are considering multi-GPU and overclocking, however as Azeem said - the obsidian line runs large so would likely work. I think some of the white Corsairs and brushed aluminum Silverstone cases are pretty classy looking too.

I'd like to encourage you to keep researching cases though... picking out the one you like best asthetically is half the fun. That's why I've been trying not to steer you too hard. We are just here for pointers and thoughts. All of these brands have really compelling lineups of good cases. So do NZXT, Antec, etc.
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September 5, 2012 11:51:15 PM

Alright well I think I have finished up the build basically, and just for safe measure, I would like for you guys to look it over again.

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/gEWF

The case is between the HAF x and the Corsair 650D, but I am pretty set on all of the other parts.

Also are there any good guides for putting this all together when I get it?
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September 6, 2012 1:21:41 PM

Looks sweet. Your case + motherboard manuals should have good instructions on putting it together (at least mine did). It's all pretty straightforward ... the parts only fit in one spot!

Did you pick a monitor yet? Dell has some good high resolution ones. The defining thing in really high end monitors will be response time. Most of the 2560x1600 or 2560 x 1440 monitors are designed for graphics, not gaming -- so you want to look for one that's big, but still pretty fast for your FPS games.
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a c 287 4 Gaming
September 6, 2012 5:42:57 PM

deadlockedworld said:
You definitely want a larger, ventilated case if you are considering multi-GPU and overclocking, however as Azeem said - the obsidian line runs large so would likely work. I think some of the white Corsairs and brushed aluminum Silverstone cases are pretty classy looking too.

I'd like to encourage you to keep researching cases though... picking out the one you like best asthetically is half the fun. That's why I've been trying not to steer you too hard. We are just here for pointers and thoughts. All of these brands have really compelling lineups of good cases. So do NZXT, Antec, etc.


Yeah those Silverstone Raven cases are pretty sweet, but a bit on the expensive side.

Quote:
The case is between the HAF x and the Corsair 650D, but I am pretty set on all of the other parts.


Go for the Obsidian.
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September 6, 2012 5:43:10 PM

deadlockedworld said:
Looks sweet. Your case + motherboard manuals should have good instructions on putting it together (at least mine did). It's all pretty straightforward ... the parts only fit in one spot!

Did you pick a monitor yet? Dell has some good high resolution ones. The defining thing in really high end monitors will be response time. Most of the 2560x1600 or 2560 x 1440 monitors are designed for graphics, not gaming -- so you want to look for one that's big, but still pretty fast for your FPS games.



Yea I have been looking at this one:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


This one is pretty nice also:

http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-S27B970D-27-Inch-LED-Lit-...

But man its expensive lol
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a b 4 Gaming
September 6, 2012 5:50:38 PM

Get the Corsair 500R then.
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September 6, 2012 5:52:08 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Yeah those Silverstone Raven cases are pretty sweet, but a bit on the expensive side.

Quote:
The case is between the HAF x and the Corsair 650D, but I am pretty set on all of the other parts.


Go for the Obsidian.


I like how the Obsidian looks, but I read that they get pretty hot. I read that the HAF x is better for air cooling, whereas the Obsidian is better if you are planning on water cooling, and yea I don't know how much I trust myself to water cool lol.
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a c 287 4 Gaming
September 6, 2012 5:54:19 PM

jaytk said:
I like how the Obsidian looks, but I read that they get pretty hot. I read that the HAF x is better for air cooling, whereas the Obsidian is better if you are planning on water cooling, and yea I don't know how much I trust myself to water cool lol.


Huh, I've never heard that about the Obsidian or the HAF X. Maybe you could try something like the NZXT Switch 810: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b 4 Gaming
September 6, 2012 6:09:04 PM

g-unit1111 said:
I've never heard that about the Obsidian

"While the 650D's different fan settings once again prove to have negligible differences, the overarching theme continues to be mediocre thermal performance. CPU temperatures are among our worst, with the other heavy duty cases able to produce results as much as eight degrees cooler. This bears out my chief concern: the 650D's negative pressure design just doesn't seem able to keep enough air flowing through the chassis to move the heat off of the processor or the graphics card."

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4529/corsair-obsidian-650...

"As you can see there's really no benefit to running the fans at any setting but the lowest, but my skepticism of the 650D's negative air pressure design from long term experience with the 600T begins to bear itself out, with thermal performance largely in the middle of the pack. SilverStone's RV03 in particular is able to produce notably better CPU and GPU temperatures while being almost $50 cheaper, and In-Win's $99 value juggernaut, the BUC, continues to run wild."

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4529/corsair-obsidian-650...

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4529/corsair-obsidian-650...
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September 6, 2012 6:16:15 PM

Like what I would like to be able to do, is have a case that provides plenty of cooling, in which I maybe could OC the CPU a little or something down the line.
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September 6, 2012 6:36:09 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Yeah those Silverstone Raven cases are pretty sweet, but a bit on the expensive side.


Yea but my FT02 was definitely worth it. Its giant, silent, and has awesome airflow. It's also as heavy and solid as a small dumptruck. The only downside is that I don't think it can handle a fourth GPU very well and isn't ideal for water cooling (radiator has to be internal). Also the huge length of the case can make cable management harder for stuff in the front.

Edit: I'm comfortable with the cost because I plan to use this for like the next three builds ... its not like it will wear out!
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a c 287 4 Gaming
September 6, 2012 6:37:39 PM

jaytk said:
Like what I would like to be able to do, is have a case that provides plenty of cooling, in which I maybe could OC the CPU a little or something down the line.


The Switch 810 I suggested will allow you to use XL-ATX motherboards, up to a three-fan liquid radiator, and has room for the biggest video cards and includes 2.5" drive adapters.

Quote:
Yea but my FT02 was definitely worth it. Its giant, silent, and has awesome airflow. It's also as heavy and solid as a small dumptruck. The only downside is that I don't think it can handle a fourth GPU very well and isn't ideal for water cooling (radiator has to be internal). Also the huge length of the case can make cable management harder for stuff in the front.


I hear that on the length of the cases - I ran into that problem when I got my new power supply with my Graphite 600T - the 8-pin voltage connector wouldn't reach the port on the motherboard from behind the tray so I have to keep it routed in front. No big deal though.
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September 7, 2012 12:19:54 AM

Best answer selected by Jaytk.
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September 7, 2012 12:21:10 AM

Dont forget to get 2 670's
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September 7, 2012 12:21:58 AM

Hmm thanks everyone for the case recommendations. Other than the case, which I am going to do a little more research on, I think I pretty much have my build ready. I will probably give best answer to g-unit since I am pretty much using his build, just with a few tweaks.

Thanks everyone for all of your helpful responses, hahah and I am sorry for all the nooby questions...
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!