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Is the PSU good enough?

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September 5, 2012 2:32:17 PM

i want to upgrade my system with an MSI Z77A-G43 MOBO and MSI GTX 660TI PE
i have an i7-2600 and a 1,5TB HDD and 8gb of DDR3 RAM @1333Mhz

I've done some research and i want to know if his PSU will do the job: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

if you have any other PSU reccomandations i would like to see them

More about : psu good

September 5, 2012 2:35:14 PM

Should be more than enough.
a b B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2012 2:47:55 PM

Yeah it's more than enough. Why upgrade the mobo though?
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September 5, 2012 2:49:59 PM

would i be able to use the msi gtx 660 ti pe card in sli with the same PSU?
or should i get a 650 or 700W PSU if i want to that?
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2012 3:12:16 PM

FinneousPJ said:
Yeah it's more than enough. Why upgrade the mobo though?


Good question.

The OCZ psu should be fine.
A GTX660ti only needs a 450w psu.

In sli, you will need at least a 650w psu with 4 6-pin pci-e connectors.
Instead of paying more up front to prepare for sli, I suggest you plan on selling the GTX660ti and replacing it with "son of kepler" or whatever is strong enough whenever you need to upgrade.
Here is my canned rant on that:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dual graphics cards vs. a good single card.

a) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX560 or 6870 can give you great performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX560ti or 6950 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single 7970 or GTX680 is about as good as it gets.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, then sli/cf will be needed.
Even that is now changing with triple monitor support on top end cards.

b) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX560ti needs a 450w psu, even a GTX580 only needs a 600w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 150-200w to your psu requirements.
A single more modern 28nm card like a 7970 or GTX680 needs only 550W.
Even the strongest GTX690 only needs 650w.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

c) Dual cards do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

d) dual card support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.

e) cf/sli up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As to what would be a good psu, look at the current PC P&C offerings.
Here is a 500w unit for $60 after rebate:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
The 600w unit is only $10 more and delivers more amps that the 600w OCZ unit.
September 5, 2012 3:13:59 PM

FinneousPJ said:
Yeah it's more than enough. Why upgrade the mobo though?

i have an medion ms7728 mobo and it isn't really cooling anymore the heatsink is just dead and doesn't fit good anymore and i want space for my RAM so i can upgade to to 4x4gb or even 4x8gb
a b B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2012 3:19:23 PM

Here is Guru3Ds power supply recommendation:

GeForce GTX 660 Ti - On your average system the card requires you to have a 450~500 Watt power supply unit.
GeForce GTX 660 Ti SLI - On your average system the cards require you to have a 700 Watt power supply unit as minimum.

If you are going to overclock GPU or processor, then we do recommend you purchase something with some more stamina. Source: http://www.guru3d.com/article/evga-geforce-gtx-660-ti-s...
September 5, 2012 3:23:49 PM

geofelt said:
Good question.

The OCZ psu should be fine.
A GTX660ti only needs a 450w psu.

In sli, you will need at least a 650w psu with 4 6-pin pci-e connectors.
Instead of paying more up front to prepare for sli, I suggest you plan on selling the GTX660ti and replacing it with "son of kepler" or whatever is strong enough whenever you need to upgrade.
Here is my canned rant on that:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dual graphics cards vs. a good single card.

a) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX560 or 6870 can give you great performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX560ti or 6950 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single 7970 or GTX680 is about as good as it gets.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, then sli/cf will be needed.
Even that is now changing with triple monitor support on top end cards.

b) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX560ti needs a 450w psu, even a GTX580 only needs a 600w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 150-200w to your psu requirements.
A single more modern 28nm card like a 7970 or GTX680 needs only 550W.
Even the strongest GTX690 only needs 650w.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

c) Dual cards do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

d) dual card support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.

e) cf/sli up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As to what would be a good psu, look at the current PC P&C offerings.
Here is a 500w unit for $60 after rebate:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
The 600w unit is only $10 more and delivers more amps that the 600w OCZ unit.


i am propably not running in SLI i just wanted to know if it was possible so i can may use it for my next upgrade so i don't need to upgrade the PSU everytime.
I want an MSI GTX 660TI PE is because I want to play games at the highest settings and 4x AA in 1920x1080 above 30FPS(I play crysis crysis warhead crysis 2 (want to buy crysis 3 and play at high or highest setting)smetro2033 borderlands(want to buy borderlads 2 also) )
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2012 3:25:11 PM

Your current motherboard will support 16gb with 2 sticks of 8gb ram.
No game I know of can use more than 2-3gb of ram. 8gb seems to be about right unless you have a 64 bit enabled app that can make use of lots of ram.
If, for whatever reason, you need more than 16gb, be aware that windows 7 home premium only supports up to 16gb.

If cooling is an issue, a $30 cooler like the hyper212 is very effective, regardless of the low price.
It has a backplate mount which will be more secure than the stock intel pushpins.
Quieter too.
September 5, 2012 3:30:15 PM

geofelt said:
Your current motherboard will support 16gb with 2 sticks of 8gb ram.
No game I know of can use more than 2-3gb of ram. 8gb seems to be about right unless you have a 64 bit enabled app that can make use of lots of ram.
If, for whatever reason, you need more than 16gb, be aware that windows 7 home premium only supports up to 16gb.

If cooling is an issue, a $30 cooler like the hyper212 is very effective, regardless of the low price.
It has a backplate mount which will be more secure than the stock intel pushpins.
Quieter too.

it is no that i need it now but mayby in a year or two i may need 16gb for gaming and i want just the option for it
a b B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2012 3:35:49 PM

rorgier10 said:
i am propably not running in SLI i just wanted to know if it was possible so i can may use it for my next upgrade so i don't need to upgrade the PSU everytime.
I want an MSI GTX 660TI PE is because I want to play games at the highest settings and 4x AA in 1920x1080 above 30FPS(I play crysis crysis warhead crysis 2 (want to buy crysis 3 and play at high or highest setting)smetro2033 borderlands(want to buy borderlads 2 also) )
:pfff:  site is lagging dismiss my last post
September 5, 2012 3:56:25 PM

rorgier10 said:
i want to upgrade my system with an MSI Z77A-G43 MOBO and MSI GTX 660TI PE
i have an i7-2600 and a 1,5TB HDD and 8gb of DDR3 RAM @1333Mhz

I've done some research and i want to know if his PSU will do the job: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

if you have any other PSU reccomandations i would like to see them



You asked for recommendations. Here's mine. Always buy the highest wattage QUALITY PSU you can afford. It will cost you a little more. Consider it an insurance policy. Stressing a PSU is the last thing you want to do on any device. It's like running your car in first gear everywhere. It will fail prematurely.
a b B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2012 4:08:56 PM

No, it is in no way like running your car in first.
September 5, 2012 4:31:20 PM

FinneousPJ said:
No, it is in no way like running your car in first.



Sorry but your ignorance is showing.
a b B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2012 4:39:00 PM

Alright fellas break it up! OP as much as the power (Watts) requirement matters, the current requirement, measured in Amps is as important if not even more important. This is especially true if you have a or several dedicated video card(s). As a general rule of thumb, you’re aiming for the highest number on the 12V line.
a b B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2012 4:48:29 PM

ram1009 said:
Sorry but your ignorance is showing.

Perhaps you'd like to elaborate your point instead of attacking my person.
a b B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2012 4:53:42 PM

Guys don't waste your time with one another it's petty bs let it go and try and have a good day!
a b B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2012 5:05:45 PM

Well it's a ridiculous analogy that doesn't apply to power electronics in any way, and then I'm being called ignorant to top it off :lol: 
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2012 5:44:44 PM

A psu will draw only the wattage/amps that it needs, regardless of it's maximum capacity.
But, a psu will operate most efficiently in the middle third of it's operating range.
If a psu operates near it's maximum the cooling fan will spin up and be noisy.

It is not wrong to overprovision a bit.
a b B Homebuilt system
September 5, 2012 6:18:19 PM

FinneousPJ said:
Well it's a ridiculous analogy that doesn't apply to power electronics in any way, and then I'm being called ignorant to top it off :lol: 
Agree but why waste your time and end up being in a bad mood the rest the day ;) 
!