Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Rebel XT and Mac OS9: impossible to combine??

Last response: in Digital Camera
Share
September 19, 2005 11:20:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'm very happy with my Rebel XT. Shot lots of pics for over the past
months. Now I'd like to download images from it through the USB cable
to a Mac G4 running system 9.2.2 (not my primary computer, but it'd be
nice to use it once in a while). Does anybody know a way to do it,
since the software that came with the camera only supports Mac OSX, and
Canon says there is no official way or software to connect camera to
mac.
Thanks in advance,
Fred
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 12:59:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1127139645.172203.121630@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
fred <fredcostapinto@gmail.com> wrote:

> I'm very happy with my Rebel XT. Shot lots of pics for over the past
> months. Now I'd like to download images from it through the USB cable
> to a Mac G4 running system 9.2.2 (not my primary computer, but it'd be
> nice to use it once in a while). Does anybody know a way to do it,
> since the software that came with the camera only supports Mac OSX, and
> Canon says there is no official way or software to connect camera to
> mac.

Get a stick reader and a computer running OS X. The old OS is dead and
buried.
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 1:24:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 19 Sep 2005 07:20:45 -0700, "fred" <fredcostapinto@gmail.com>
wrote:

>I'm very happy with my Rebel XT. Shot lots of pics for over the past
>months. Now I'd like to download images from it through the USB cable
>to a Mac G4 running system 9.2.2 (not my primary computer, but it'd be
>nice to use it once in a while). Does anybody know a way to do it,
>since the software that came with the camera only supports Mac OSX, and
>Canon says there is no official way or software to connect camera to
>mac.
>Thanks in advance,
>Fred

Get a card reader....


******************************************************

"I have been a witness, and these pictures are
my testimony. The events I have recorded should
not be forgotten and must not be repeated."

-James Nachtwey-
http://www.jamesnachtwey.com/
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 1:24:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <bhiti19g6m356on759aji44gqt0jdkos1n@4ax.com>,
John A. Stovall <johnastovall@earthlink.net> wrote:

> On 19 Sep 2005 07:20:45 -0700, "fred" <fredcostapinto@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> >I'm very happy with my Rebel XT. Shot lots of pics for over the past
> >months. Now I'd like to download images from it through the USB cable
> >to a Mac G4 running system 9.2.2 (not my primary computer, but it'd be
> >nice to use it once in a while). Does anybody know a way to do it,
> >since the software that came with the camera only supports Mac OSX, and
> >Canon says there is no official way or software to connect camera to
> >mac.
> >Thanks in advance,
> >Fred
>
> Get a card reader....

Try an older version of Graphic convertor.
--
Panta rei
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 7:56:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Today fred spoke these views with conviction for everyone's
edification:

> I'm very happy with my Rebel XT. Shot lots of pics for over
> the past months. Now I'd like to download images from it
> through the USB cable to a Mac G4 running system 9.2.2 (not
> my primary computer, but it'd be nice to use it once in a
> while). Does anybody know a way to do it, since the
> software that came with the camera only supports Mac OSX,
> and Canon says there is no official way or software to
> connect camera to mac.

Fred, this is OT to your OP, but I've been considering a Rebel
XT to replace my Nikon Coolpix 5700 for some time. I'm still in
favor of EVF cameras but am considering a DSLR to get better
quality pictures at high ISO.

And, I'm interested in getting a camera more reliable for flash
pictures of cars in museums than my 5700 or the Nikon Coolpix
8800 I tested in April.

So, my question to you would be have you taken pictures of
/anything/ in the dark environment of most museums with either
the built-in flash or somebody's external? If yes, how would you
judge the exposure correctness and consistency?

Thanks.

--
ATM, aka Jerry
September 19, 2005 11:32:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thanks to all for swift replies. I know about and agree on the card
reader. I didn't get one yet for 2 reasons: as I said, it's not crucial
that I use this Mac (I usually carry a laptop anyway) and this readers
are not that inexpensive down here in Brazil. I already got a CF to
PCcard adapter that does the trick (for the laptop at least) and is
pretty fast.
Regarding accurate exposures with flash, I second the last reply. The
XT is quite accurate (actually, dead on many times) but far from
prefect too close or too far away (as almost any on-camera flash unit).
But very usable after tweaking in PS. I also used an old Sunpak 383
Super, and that was great. Swivels and bounces, so you can use walls
and low ceilings as a reflected huge light source.
I was also pleased by ISO1600 exposures. I got a cheap 50mm f/1.8,
which becomes a funny 80mm with the XT, and ISO1600 with a f/1.8
lens...
Thanks again,
Fred
September 20, 2005 12:20:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

All_Things_Mopar wrote:

>> I'm very happy with my Rebel XT. Shot lots of pics for over
>> the past months. Now I'd like to download images from it
>> through the USB cable to a Mac G4 running system 9.2.2 (not
>> my primary computer, but it'd be nice to use it once in a
>> while). Does anybody know a way to do it, since the
>> software that came with the camera only supports Mac OSX,
>> and Canon says there is no official way or software to
>> connect camera to mac.

As others have mentioned, a card reader will do the trick. It would
likely be faster too.

>So, my question to you would be have you taken pictures of
>/anything/ in the dark environment of most museums with either
>the built-in flash or somebody's external? If yes, how would you
>judge the exposure correctness and consistency?

The Rebel XT/350 built-in flash is somewhat limited in power, but the
E-TTL 2 control is quite good. I regularly get smooth, accurate
exposures using both the built-in and external flash.

I don't know if I've just been lucky, but the only times I've noticed a
nasty exposure relates to the distance extremes. Using the built-in
flash for distant subjects and using it too close to the subject, causes
some irregularity. However, a decent external flash with a bounce head
like the EX-420/430 will give you excellent results.
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 4:12:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Today Bill spoke these views with conviction for everyone's
edification:


>>So, my question to you would be have you taken pictures of
>>/anything/ in the dark environment of most museums with
>>either the built-in flash or somebody's external? If yes,
>>how would you judge the exposure correctness and
>>consistency?
>
> The Rebel XT/350 built-in flash is somewhat limited in
> power, but the E-TTL 2 control is quite good. I regularly
> get smooth, accurate exposures using both the built-in and
> external flash.
>
> I don't know if I've just been lucky, but the only times
> I've noticed a nasty exposure relates to the distance
> extremes. Using the built-in flash for distant subjects and
> using it too close to the subject, causes some
> irregularity. However, a decent external flash with a
> bounce head like the EX-420/430 will give you excellent
> results.

Thanks, Bill. If you've seen my previous posts on museum
flash, you will know the frustration I've suffered even with
good external flash units such as Nikon's SB-800 on the Nikon
8800 I tested extensively in April. As best I can tell, what
causes the problem for me is the sensor on the flash getting
"fooled" in any number of ways by reflection off some part of
the car and/or the background, and the inability of my current
5700 to run in full manual mode using only the flash's GN.

My local camera store manager is big on the Rebel XT and
claims it'll solve my problem because he feels that a DSLR is
intrinsically better able to cope with difficult flash
exposure situations, although I've not been able to find any
independent studies to support that assertion nor even mild
agreement on this NG, so occasionally, I'll ask when somebody
says they have a Rebel XT and are happy with it.

--
ATM, aka Jerry
September 22, 2005 12:21:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

All_Things_Mopar wrote:

>> The Rebel XT/350 built-in flash is somewhat limited in
>> power, but the E-TTL 2 control is quite good. I regularly
>> get smooth, accurate exposures using both the built-in and
>> external flash.
>>
>> I don't know if I've just been lucky, but the only times
>> I've noticed a nasty exposure relates to the distance
>> extremes. Using the built-in flash for distant subjects and
>> using it too close to the subject, causes some
>> irregularity. However, a decent external flash with a
>> bounce head like the EX-420/430 will give you excellent
>> results.
>
>Thanks, Bill. If you've seen my previous posts on museum
>flash, you will know the frustration I've suffered even with

Actually I haven't read those posts, but I can understand the
frustration with not getting good results.

One good thing about digital...take lots of photos from various angles
and weed out the bad shots. With film, I was always conservative and
meticulous with my shots. But with digital, I'm having a lot more fun
since I worry less about wasting film, and concentrate more on enjoying
the experience.

>My local camera store manager is big on the Rebel XT and
>claims it'll solve my problem because he feels that a DSLR is
>intrinsically better able to cope with difficult flash
>exposure situations, although I've not been able to find any
>independent studies to support that assertion nor even mild
>agreement on this NG, so occasionally, I'll ask when somebody
>says they have a Rebel XT and are happy with it.

I don't know if what the store manager said is true or not, and I would
tend not to believe him since he wants to make a sale, but the XT
certainly does a LOT better job with flash than my little Canon A75
point and shoot. I'd say it's at least as good as my film bodies if not
better. The newer E-TTL 2 is likely the reason.

How about this...make sure the store has a 100% refund policy (7 days or
better so you have time to evaluate all of its features) and if you're
not happy with the results, you can simply return the camera.

The local store where I buy all my stuff has a 14-day no questions asked
refund and 30-day exchange policy, so as long as you take care of the
camera, exchanging for another model or getting your money back is
hassle-free.

One last thing...buy some good glass for the XT. I usually put L-glass
on mine, and the XT can certainly make good use of it.
Anonymous
September 22, 2005 1:22:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Today Bill spoke these views with conviction for everyone's
edification:

> How about this...make sure the store has a 100% refund
> policy (7 days or better so you have time to evaluate all
> of its features) and if you're not happy with the results,
> you can simply return the camera.

This store does have a 10-day money back guarantee which I
took advantage of when the Nikon 8800 didn't pan out. But, as
I said previously, I don't want to go in there several times a
year and ask to test drive something new, so I've been quietly
trying to gather more info to support or deny the overall
contention that a DSLR is better than even an advanced EVF
before I try out the next better mouse trap which may or may
not be the Rebel XT.

So far, the best I've been able to come up with is, all other
factors being equal though they seldom are, DSLRs do much
better at low noise at any given ISO.

The rub is that so few people have museum flash experience at
all, much less of cars, which are notoriously difficult to
shoot due to mucho glare problems and the problem of uneven
lighting, that I can't get even a feel for what technology I
should buy, much less what brand and model.

[snip]
> One last thing...buy some good glass for the XT. I usually
> put L-glass on mine, and the XT can certainly make good use
> of it.

Well, this is indeed another good reason to go DSLR except
that it is essentially impossible to beat the 8:1 zoom on my
5700 or the 10:1 zoom on an 8800. Even spending really big
bucks, it can't be done and what is available to the best of
my knowledge on a large ratio wide-to-tele lenses is they are
also very big and very heavy.

And the quest goes on...Thanks again for the insights.

--
ATM, aka Jerry
September 23, 2005 1:14:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

All_Things_Mopar wrote:

>> You could also consider loaners - see if the store will let
>> you drop a deposit and borrow store demos for a day, shoot
>> off a few, make some decisions, then go back and make a
>> purchase. Remember, they WANT to make a sale...give them
>> incentive to do so.
>
>Hadn't thought of that, thanks.

Something else to consider...do you have any friends with digital SLR's
that could help or let you borrow one for a day? That's how I made my
decision - playing with one in the store doesn't cut it.

Or how about if you're at an event and you spy someone with a digital
SLR, start talking "shop" with him and see if he'll let you fire off
some shots on your own memory card for later examination. I wouldn't
object to someone using mine for a bit if they seemed genuinely
interested in getting a DSLR.

>Well, once burned, twice shy, hence the attempt I made on this
>NG to get a read on how well a Rebel XT might work for me
>early this summer, and the conversation you and I are having
>now. And, I've continued to quietly monitor this NG and the
>DSLR news group as well as occasionally popping into
>dpreview.com and let's say I'm still plenty confused.

I haven't used Nikon gear very much, but from what I've read and heard,
they have a very good flash system with their SLR's, equal to Canon I'm
sure.

>type of documentary photography I'm doing and the relatively
>short amount of time I can devote to a "shoot", neither
>tripods nor slaves are really feasible, although I do
>understand why both would be better than a single flash
>mounted on top the camera.

Well then that sounds more like you need a fixed lighting source, or a
low-light lense along with higher ISO settings. Any of the recent
digital SLR cameras will produce low noise images up to ISO 800 or 1600.
That combined with a 50mm or 85mm lense should get you some good
low-light images. Then post-process as needed.

As for not getting close to your subject, I've found that simply asking
to get closer will often work at informal events.

I've been able to get behind the barriers at many locales simply by
asking quietly and politely. When they see you have an SLR and a gadget
bag, they know you're serious about the photos, and most organizations
know that publicity of any kind is a good thing. Heck, I've been behind
security at trade show events, air shows, and even Indy races.

>Again, thanks, Bill for the excellent insights.

No problem! I hope I helped a bit.
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 1:14:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Today Bill spoke these views with conviction for everyone's
edification:

> Something else to consider...do you have any friends with
> digital SLR's that could help or let you borrow one for a
> day? That's how I made my decision - playing with one in
> the store doesn't cut it.

I wish I did, but my friends are more of the P & S persuasion.

I definitely agree that just playing with a camera in a store
won't cut it, except to eliminate brands or models that just
don't feel right in your hands. The only way to do it right is
what we've already talked about - buy it with a 7-10 day money
back guarantee.

For example, I can shoot flash all day long in the typical
camera store with nary an underexposure problem. Ditto for
shots in my house. But, cars in a museum are a whole different
kettle of fish. Besides the obvious reflection challenges,
there's usually no nearby walls or ceilings to help you by
keeping the flash's pulse from being sent into infinity nor to
allow simple bounch flash by tilting or rotating the flash
head. But, mainly, the problem is the flash's sensor not
looking at the same thing the camera's auto exposure sampling
area would be looking at if shooting available light.
>
> Or how about if you're at an event and you spy someone with
> a digital SLR, start talking "shop" with him and see if
> he'll let you fire off some shots on your own memory card
> for later examination. I wouldn't object to someone using
> mine for a bit if they seemed genuinely interested in
> getting a DSLR.

I've done that occasionally at outdoor car shows when I could
hear the click-clack sound characteristic of a DSLR mirror
flipping up and down but frequently people with cameras at car
museums are also P & S, so I can't recall ever seeing a
"serious amateur". But, this is another good idea for me to be
on the lookout for.

>>Well, once burned, twice shy, hence the attempt I made on
>>this NG to get a read on how well a Rebel XT might work for
>>me early this summer, and the conversation you and I are
>>having now. And, I've continued to quietly monitor this NG
>>and the DSLR news group as well as occasionally popping
>>into dpreview.com and let's say I'm still plenty confused.
>
> I haven't used Nikon gear very much, but from what I've
> read and heard, they have a very good flash system with
> their SLR's, equal to Canon I'm sure.

I'll accept that. I think where I went astray with the 8800
was believing that the new iTTL system was all-knew from the
perspective of my particular problem. What I learned first
hand and from pestering tech support was that the flash
exposure control wasn't all that different than the 5700.

>>type of documentary photography I'm doing and the
>>relatively short amount of time I can devote to a "shoot",
>>neither tripods nor slaves are really feasible, although I
>>do understand why both would be better than a single flash
>>mounted on top the camera.
>
> Well then that sounds more like you need a fixed lighting
> source, or a low-light lense along with higher ISO
> settings. Any of the recent digital SLR cameras will
> produce low noise images up to ISO 800 or 1600. That
> combined with a 50mm or 85mm lense should get you some good
> low-light images. Then post-process as needed.

Agreed, which is why I'm keeping a more open mind of late on
switching to a DSLR.

> As for not getting close to your subject, I've found that
> simply asking to get closer will often work at informal
> events.

The problem is usually one where there's barriers to getting
closer to a particular part of a car, which I often get around
by walking across the exhibit area to get a long-distance view
of the other side of the car where I can isolate the detail
that is blocked on the side with the barrier.

I seldom if ever have trouble with crowd control. I've never
had to even ask anyone to move. I just stand some distance
back and be patient until they've completed their close
inspection. Or, as you advise above WRT to camera usage, I may
engage another spectator in a discussion where I learn things
and they eventually walk away and I can get my shot.

> I've been able to get behind the barriers at many locales
> simply by asking quietly and politely. When they see you
> have an SLR and a gadget bag, they know you're serious
> about the photos, and most organizations know that
> publicity of any kind is a good thing. Heck, I've been
> behind security at trade show events, air shows, and even
> Indy races.

The two most common places for me to go are the Henry Ford
Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, and the Walter P. Chrysler
Museum in Auburn Hills, Michigan. Both severely frown upon
even touching a barrier, much less stepping over or around
one, even if I'm nowhere near the car.

The WPC Museum is on the grounds of the DaimlerChrysler
Technology Center where I used to work until I retired. The
pros doing photography, particular that which has PR
advantages to the WPC Museum are granted access on Mondays
when the musuem is closed to the public. And, occasionally, I
see a couple of guys with a large set-up including a tripod
and multiple lights/reflectors, who're allowed to move the
barriers with assistance from the museum staff. But, ordinary
guests aren't granted that privelidge.

--
ATM, aka Jerry
!