Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Can I run a 7870?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
July 19, 2012 5:05:50 PM

I currently own a pre-built Dell XPS 8500 because I wasn't planning on playing that many games, however I seemed to have gotten into BF3 and now I need a better GPU since 30 fps on lows isn't really ideal. Now, my computer comes with a 460w psu, and I'm running a 6570 as of right now. Dell gives you the option to upgrade to a 7870 in their high-end model, but to me that seems to be really stretching it. The 7870 looks like a really nice card, so I'm wondering if I could run it on my current system (since according to Dell, I can)?

PC Specs:
3rd Gen Intel Core i7 - 3770 (3.4 GHz with Turbo Boost to 3.9 GHz)
8GB Dual Channel DDR3 1600MHz - 2 DIMMs
1TB 7200 RPM SATA Hard Drive 6.0 Gb/s
Intel H77 motherboard PCI Express 2.0
16X DVD+/-RW
Dell Wireless 1703 802.11b/g/n, Bluetooth v4.0+LE

PSU:
100-240V
50-60Hz, 8A
+12VA 18A
+12VC 8A
+5V 25A
+5Vaux 3.0A
+12VB 16A
+3.3V 17A
-12V .3A
+5V and +3.3V shall not exceed 142W
+12VA, +12VB and +12VC shall not exceed 385W

More about : run 7870

July 19, 2012 5:19:44 PM

That PSU won't be enough to run a 7870 the next step up probably comes with the 7870 and a different PSU to go with it, however, companies that put together computers, like Dell, HP, etc.., will use the cheapest stuff they can get and usually the PSU takes a big hit. You'll need to buy, I'd say probably a 550w PSU at least from a decent company, and then the GPU. Most people prefer the 7850 thought because it can be overclocked higher, but that's up to you if you want to OC or not.

Heres a decent PSU that you could buy: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
This one should be more than enought power, and it's a well made unit so it won't blow up.
m
0
l
Related resources
July 19, 2012 7:15:07 PM

Really? :S Then why would Dell put a 7870 in their high-end model with the same PSU? That's sort of what I'm wondering, too.
m
0
l
July 19, 2012 7:19:22 PM

ausert said:
Really? :S Then why would Dell put a 7870 in their high-end model with the same PSU? That's sort of what I'm wondering, too.

Like I said, they probably put in a more powerful PSU, not that it really matters any PSU that Dell, or any other company puts into their computers is going to be garbage.
m
0
l
July 19, 2012 7:23:00 PM

oem companies build computers in search of profit, so most of the time, they will find a corner in which they can cut off profit. corner one is usually gpu because they are usually unnecessary because igpu can run the system. because of the face that there is no gpu or a low powered one(like a 6450 for instance) they cut down on the psu on purpose because the rest of the build will not take much to power. So if one wants to add a gpu, they either are stuck with low power cards like the 7750, or is forced to change power supplies.
m
0
l

Best solution

July 19, 2012 8:06:17 PM

ausert said:
I currently own a pre-built Dell XPS 8500 because I wasn't planning on playing that many games, however I seemed to have gotten into BF3 and now I need a better GPU since 30 fps on lows isn't really ideal. Now, my computer comes with a 460w psu, and I'm running a 6570 as of right now. Dell gives you the option to upgrade to a 7870 in their high-end model, but to me that seems to be really stretching it. The 7870 looks like a really nice card, so I'm wondering if I could run it on my current system (since according to Dell, I can)?

PC Specs:
3rd Gen Intel Core i7 - 3770 (3.4 GHz with Turbo Boost to 3.9 GHz)
8GB Dual Channel DDR3 1600MHz - 2 DIMMs
1TB 7200 RPM SATA Hard Drive 6.0 Gb/s
Intel H77 motherboard PCI Express 2.0
16X DVD+/-RW
Dell Wireless 1703 802.11b/g/n, Bluetooth v4.0+LE

PSU:
100-240V
50-60Hz, 8A
+12VA 18A
+12VC 8A
+5V 25A
+5Vaux 3.0A
+12VB 16A
+3.3V 17A
-12V .3A
+5V and +3.3V shall not exceed 142W
+12VA, +12VB and +12VC shall not exceed 385W



Dell's power supplies aren't the best by any means, but they are not terrible either. The ATI 7000 series of graphics cards drastically reduced power consumption over the 6000 series due to die shrink and better power management by the gpu. Therefore, massive PSUs aren't as necessary as they were a generation ago unless you are going with TRI SLI or TRIFIRE.

I put your specs into Thermaltake's Power Supply Calculator and at 90% system load came up with 309 watts, so you would be pulling 67% of your PSU's wattage which is totally fine.

http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/Power

My view is that it’s a middle of the line card and a moderate upgrade, with low powerdraw even during gaming, and that your PSU can handle it comfortably. If you want the card, get it. If things seem a bit glitchy thereafter (and I would be surprised if they were), a random crash here and there, then upgrade your PSU.

Share
July 19, 2012 9:08:29 PM

Mm, so basically, I can do it, but there's no saying what can happen long-term... What would happen if let's say-- there's not enough power?
m
0
l
July 19, 2012 9:15:13 PM

if they're isnt enough power it will turn its self off yet since we dont really know that its good or bad sometimes if its really bad then it can short out you mobo gpu ect.
m
0
l
July 20, 2012 12:28:43 AM

Thanks for all the help guys, however, I'm just wondering how many amps does it take to run a 7870?
m
0
l
July 20, 2012 3:43:55 PM

Best answer selected by ausert.
m
0
l
!