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CPU and Motherboard for New Build (First) *help*

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September 7, 2012 8:06:01 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: Next couple of weeks

Budget Range: Quality is somewhat going to trump price for me e.g. if it's really good and you think it's really good, I'll probably save for it/buy it.

System Usage from Most to Least Important: gaming mostly (high end/medium-high end)

Are you buying a monitor: No

Parts to Upgrade: CPU MOBO

Do you need to buy OS: Yes

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg, amazon and tiger direct

Location: Arlington, VA (near DC) in USA

Parts Preferences: Intel based I think

Overclocking: Yes/Maybe

SLI or Crossfire: Yes/not right away but in the future

Your Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

Additional Comments: I think I can go a WEE expensive on the CPU and Motherboard if it's worth it.

I'm writing to ask the forums about ideas regarding a top-end or near top-end motherboard that will last me quite a while. I'm building my first PC, for gaming mostly, maybe a little bit of video/photo editing but gaming mainly. I know there are a lot out there and I've researched quite a few. Is there any way I can narrow it down? The price range I'm looking at is 150-300 or so, MAAYBE going higher depending on whether I can get more out of it in the future, so upgradability is key. Also, in conjunction with unpicked higher-mid-tier-mobo, which CPU would work best with it? Any and all advice would be greatly appreciated. I would like to get them very soon. I have this already:

1 x ($114.99) Corsair Carbide Series 500R Black Steel structure with molded ABS plastic accent pieces ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
$114.99

1 x ($57.99) CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 2133 Desktop Memory Model CMZ8GX3M2A2133C11B
$57.99

Delivery estimate: Sept. 11, 2012
1 "Corsair CX Series CX750 750W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Power Supply CP-9020015-NA"
Personal Computers; $86.00
In Stock
Sold by: Amazon.com
1 "Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO CPU Cooler with 120mm PWM Fan (RR-212E-20PK-R2)"
Personal Computers; $32.08
In Stock

Previously considered mobo, CPU and other components are as follows:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
ASRock motherboard $134.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
i5 processor $229.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
dvd/cd optic drive $17.99

http://www.amazon.com/SanDisk-2-5-Inch-Solid-SDSSDP-128...
SSDrive 128GB $89.95

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Windows 7 HP $99.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
1TB WD Hard Drive (Internal) $84.99

And a GeForce GTX 580 from a while back that I have not had a chance to use. I would like to replace those with 670's SLI'd in the future, or at least the 660 Ti's. Any and all help would be greatly appreciated, It's my first one so I don't know much.

I think I'd prefer ASUS I guess because of the ease of installation, and Intel just because that's what I've used all my life.

I was also thinking to overclock in the future. I'm not entirely sure what that is yet, but I want the full potential out of the CPU I'd be getting.

More about : cpu motherboard build

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a b à CPUs
September 7, 2012 8:28:50 PM
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That's a bit overkill on the RAM speed. Those faster kits are known to stress the memory controller on the CPU, and Intel only allows 1600mhz CL11 1.5V per the spec sheet for Ivy Bridge. Anything more is considered an overclock that voids the warranty.

I think the board and CPU choice are fine as is.

You might want to upgrade the PSU a bit.

Rosewill Capstone modular
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
A PSU that performs just like very expensive ones, internally high quality. Cables may be lower quality and fan may not last as long as the others.

Corsair HX750
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Not sure how this performs right off, it's a newer revision. I always prefer fully modular because it makes cable replacement so easy, and this is not fully modular. But Corsair has fantastic support.

Seasonic X750
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Fully modular with higher quality cables than the Rosewill, but electrically they perform similarly. I know a lot about PSUs and I use an X650 ;) 

That looks like a very slow SSD. Samsung 830 is reliable and fast and shipped free
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
September 7, 2012 8:42:34 PM

Spending too much money on a doomed socket is just idiotic, any "good enough" motherboard will be fine....

*CX series PSUs are definitely not the best... you can get something better for the same price.

*The 212 evo is a good cooler but a bit overated.... there are better options for a tiny bit less.

*the GTX580 is a strong card with a lot of juice left.... no need to get another card.

*Take a look at my signature builds, depending on your budget you can find something really good there.
Related resources
September 7, 2012 9:07:35 PM

Proximon said:
That's a bit overkill on the RAM speed. Those faster kits are known to stress the memory controller on the CPU, and Intel only allows 1600mhz CL11 1.5V per the spec sheet for Ivy Bridge. Anything more is considered an overclock that voids the warranty.

I think the board and CPU choice are fine as is.

You might want to upgrade the PSU a bit.

Rosewill Capstone modular
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
A PSU that performs just like very expensive ones, internally high quality. Cables may be lower quality and fan may not last as long as the others.

Corsair HX750
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Not sure how this performs right off, it's a newer revision. I always prefer fully modular because it makes cable replacement so easy, and this is not fully modular. But Corsair has fantastic support.

Seasonic X750
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Fully modular with higher quality cables than the Rosewill, but electrically they perform similarly. I know a lot about PSUs and I use an X650 ;) 

That looks like a very slow SSD. Samsung 830 is reliable and fast and shipped free
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Unfortunately, I already purchased both the memory cards and the PSU :( 

Will it damage my CPU at all? I can return the PSU for a modular, that's actually what I was trying to get, I tried to cancel my order when I saw it wasn't modular but, lo, already shipped. How is everything else by the way? (Keeping in mind I will probably end up getting that Samsung SSD). Will I be able to play the latest and greatest? Mainly BF3 =P
September 7, 2012 9:12:05 PM

idroid said:
Spending too much money on a doomed socket is just idiotic, any "good enough" motherboard will be fine....

*CX series PSUs are definitely not the best... you can get something better for the same price.

*The 212 evo is a good cooler but a bit overated.... there are better options for a tiny bit less.

*the GTX580 is a strong card with a lot of juice left.... no need to get another card.

*Take a look at my signature builds, depending on your budget you can find something really good there.


Those are all really well made builds! I'm just really smoothing out an already laid out idea, however.
September 7, 2012 9:16:33 PM

jonclimbs247 said:
Unfortunately, I already purchased both the memory cards and the PSU :( 

Will it damage my CPU at all? I can return the PSU for a modular, that's actually what I was trying to get, I tried to cancel my order when I saw it wasn't modular but, lo, already shipped. How is everything else by the way? (Keeping in mind I will probably end up getting that Samsung SSD). Will I be able to play the latest and greatest? Mainly BF3 =P


Well...can't you return them when they arrive?
a b à CPUs
September 7, 2012 10:02:55 PM

You don't have to run the memory at the rated speed. It will default to 1333 or 1600 anyway.

On the PSU, it's new and has not been reviewed. It should work fine. There will be a big mess of cables that you will need to deal with, but they can be tucked away fairly well in that case:
http://www.guru3d.com/article/corsair-carbide-500r-revi...
September 8, 2012 2:52:31 PM

Best answer selected by jonclimbs247.
September 8, 2012 5:25:14 PM

Proximon said:
You don't have to run the memory at the rated speed. It will default to 1333 or 1600 anyway.

On the PSU, it's new and has not been reviewed. It should work fine. There will be a big mess of cables that you will need to deal with, but they can be tucked away fairly well in that case:
http://www.guru3d.com/article/corsair-carbide-500r-revi...


You've been a really big help! I decided to go with the Corsair HX750 because I saw so many good reviews and I don't mind that it's not FULLY modular. It's mostly. I'm also glad to hear that my memory will default to the more standard 1333 or 1600. That eased my worries a bit. For the CPU fan I chose, do I need a separate paste or does it come with it? Say Arctic 5?
a b à CPUs
September 8, 2012 7:19:04 PM

Just go with the supplied paste. We don't recommend AS5 anymore for beginners, as there are more user friendly types that do just as well or better. If you are very careful with AS5, you can get it to match some of the better products in performance... after a 200 hour cure time. Then it will need to be replaced in 2 years :lol: 
September 8, 2012 7:24:10 PM

Proximon said:
Just go with the supplied paste. We don't recommend AS5 anymore for beginners, as there are more user friendly types that do just as well or better. If you are very careful with AS5, you can get it to match some of the better products in performance... after a 200 hour cure time. Then it will need to be replaced in 2 years :lol: 


And the supplied paste, I'll just apply that directly to the CPU heatspreader? I've heard of a "finger-in-bag-approach" where I literally put my finger in a plastic bag and spread 1 grain of rice sized amount over the heatspreader? Good approach or made up to make me a fool?
a b à CPUs
September 8, 2012 7:47:36 PM

When two surfaces are very flat and smooth any paste between them will spread very evenly by itself, under the high pressure that will be applied. This gets a bit more complicated when the other surface has heatpipes exposed, and little channels in the flat surface as a result.

I like the idea of filling those channels with paste first, scraping off the excess with a credit card or razor blade. Then the frozen pea sized drop in the center of the CPU heatspreader. I don't think it makes a huge difference though.

I have also done this and drawn lines of paste on the heatpipes, rather than a drop. Works well that way too.... there were tests done at some point that showed very little difference. I wonder if I can find that ancient post for you....

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/252942-29-some-notes-...

Just don't take it all as the absolute truth. It's a theory, and never fully proven... that is why I NEVER had it put up as a sticky thread.
September 17, 2012 2:44:43 PM

Proximon said:
When two surfaces are very flat and smooth any paste between them will spread very evenly by itself, under the high pressure that will be applied. This gets a bit more complicated when the other surface has heatpipes exposed, and little channels in the flat surface as a result.

I like the idea of filling those channels with paste first, scraping off the excess with a credit card or razor blade. Then the frozen pea sized drop in the center of the CPU heatspreader. I don't think it makes a huge difference though.

I have also done this and drawn lines of paste on the heatpipes, rather than a drop. Works well that way too.... there were tests done at some point that showed very little difference. I wonder if I can find that ancient post for you....

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/252942-29-some-notes-...

Just don't take it all as the absolute truth. It's a theory, and never fully proven... that is why I NEVER had it put up as a sticky thread.


Thank you! =D
!