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Best multi-purpose card GTX 570/580/670

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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a b 4 Gaming
July 23, 2012 6:15:19 PM

I am putting together a new gaming system, but also want it to be resonably agile with video editing. My original thought for a best compromise was the GTX570, but then, looking at the gaming benchmarks, moved towards the 670. My problem is, whilst it's been suggested the 670 may not be as good with video editing, I've been unable to "get a handle" on by how much. My attitude is, if the 670 is just a few percent slower, with video, than the 570, stick with the 670. However, if the 670 is markedly worse, it may be worth considering the GTX 580, but don't particularly want to go that route, unless it's really worth it. Some advice would be greatly appreciated.
:ange: 
July 23, 2012 6:39:50 PM

The newer Kepler based cards in the 600 series have much reduced computational capabilities compared to the last generation based on the Fermi die. This was a strategic decision on Nvidia's part to emphasize gaming over computational for consumer use. They have a separate die GK110 and maybe others made just for Double Precision and Single Precision computational loads. As far as video editing is concerned, I'm not sure any video editing makes full use of modern GPU's like encoding or transcoding. You are probably safe with a 670, it is cooler, quieter and newer, not to mention faster in games.
a b Î Nvidia
a b 4 Gaming
July 23, 2012 6:53:16 PM

People who say that 670 is bad for video editing have no clue. Geforce 600 series have reduced computational capabilities, but video editing is not computation. CUDA and OpenCL are computational languages, and they are used in scientific research and number crunching, while video editing is similar kind of task like gaming: you're getting a video output, instead of numbers. That's why GTX 670 is good for video editing, and since it's faster than GTX 570 at gaming, it's faster at video editing as well.
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July 23, 2012 6:55:52 PM

Sunius said:
People who say that 670 is bad for video editing have no clue. Geforce 600 series have reduced computational capabilities, but video editing is not computation. CUDA and OpenCL are computational languages, and they are used in scientific research and number crunching, while video editing is similar kind of task like gaming: you're getting a video output, instead of numbers. That's why GTX 670 is good for video editing, and since it's faster than GTX 570 at gaming, it's faster at video editing as well.


Without knowing the exact optimizations of the video editing programs out there today, or what the OP will eventually use, I had to give a generic response, just that the computational capabilities of Kepler is hobbled compared to Fermi.

There is no particular reason why modern or future video editing programs won't leverage GPUs. My recommendation was for a 670 anyway.
a b 4 Gaming
July 23, 2012 7:24:33 PM

Thanks for the reassurance, guys. It's just that, after you've heard the "it's got to be Quadro or Fermi", a few times, you get to wonder. I tend to think, while they may have SOME benefits, in SOME processes, overall it's pretty marginal, unless you're planning on a 3D remake of Star Wars (a bit beyond my skill set).
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