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New gaming build, how is it?

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September 11, 2012 4:05:42 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: Within a week
Budget Range: 600-800

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, day to day internet/media consumption

Are you buying a monitor: No



Parts to Upgrade: All new

Do you need to buy OS: Yes


Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Okay with anything reputable, have amazon prime

Location: City, State/Region, Country -Washington, no nearby stores

Parts Preferences: No preference

Overclocking: No

SLI or Crossfire: No

Your Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

Additional Comments:
I would prefer for the computer to be on the quiet side, though if the noise cranks up during gaming I'm okay with that.
I am also wanting the case to be on the small size. I looked into mITX at first, but it seemed to up the price considerably.
I built a comp last spring using the Core 1000 for the kiddo and have been happy with it, but it is a low end build so I do not know if putting hotter components in one is such a good idea.

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: The wifes computer is starting to have some problems, and was originally built as an HTPC, so even with a GPU upgrade it has never been that great. With Torchlight 2(her comp has cpu issues with number 1) and Borderlands 2 coming out it would be a nice surprise to have her set up working better for late night co-op fun.
Thank you for any suggestions and tips.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/h6bZ
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/h6bZ/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/h6bZ/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Pentium G2120 3.1GHz Dual-Core Processor ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock B75M Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($72.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Agility 3 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($154.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7770 GHz Edition 1GB Video Card ($116.97 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Core 1000 MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($46.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Antec 380W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($43.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $675.44
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-10 18:41 EDT-0400)

More about : gaming build

September 11, 2012 4:20:42 PM

It's incredibly pointless to spend $150 of your $700 budget on an SSD - and the Agility 3 is not a good choice. I'd also use H77 over B75 and I'd use the i3-2120 over the G2120.

I actually think I'd scrap that whole build and go for something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i3-3220 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($87.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: Mushkin Silverline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($37.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($88.98 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7850 2GB Video Card ($205.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair 650W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS224-06 DVD/CD Writer ($29.97 @ Newegg)
Total: $710.44
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-11 12:22 EDT-0400)

A little bit more but that system will last you way longer.
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September 11, 2012 4:27:46 PM

g-unit1111 said:
A little bit more but that system will last you way longer.

It's not much good without an OS though.
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September 11, 2012 4:37:19 PM

Sakkura said:
It's not much good without an OS though.


OP's build didn't have OS either. If you need to stay in budget how about this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i3-2120 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($114.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($87.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: Mushkin Silverline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($37.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($62.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 560 Ti 1GB Video Card ($174.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.49 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: Corsair 600W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($51.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS90 DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($90.58 @ Amazon)
Total: $688.55
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-11 12:36 EDT-0400)
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September 11, 2012 4:52:01 PM

Thank you for the suggestions so far.

I put up the wrong build in the initial post, and had already planned on dropping the size of the ssd down to a samsung 830 128. We had external drives and network storage that is fast enough for media and game backups, so the 128 should be plenty of storage and should make the comp nice and perky.

The case you suggest is far larger that I am willing to go with at about twice the volume of the core 1000.

Why would you go with h77 over b75? I am not seeing any features on the h77 that I would need. I understand it is not a significantly more expensive choice, but if I can save a few bucks and not miss anything why not?

I also have no need for an optical drive and with most cases I find they look better without one, so again save a few bucks and end up just as happy or happier.

That i3 is a good upgrade, and the build is coming out cheap enough I could probably go a step or two up from it.

With my original build the 380 watt was looking like it had about 100watts of extra juice after checking it all on a psu calculator. Does the jump to an i3 and 560 really warrant needing an extra 200 watts?
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September 11, 2012 5:26:57 PM

Quote:
I put up the wrong build in the initial post, and had already planned on dropping the size of the ssd down to a samsung 830 128. We had external drives and network storage that is fast enough for media and game backups, so the 128 should be plenty of storage and should make the comp nice and perky.


The bad thing is with the size of today's games that 128GB will get eaten up very quickly.

Quote:
Why would you go with h77 over b75? I am not seeing any features on the h77 that I would need. I understand it is not a significantly more expensive choice, but if I can save a few bucks and not miss anything why not?


B75 is meant for business machines that use older hardware. It has parallel and serial ports on them and you will never use them as those haven't really been used in 15 years. H77 supports USB 3.0 and SATA 6 for newer hardware and peripherals.

Quote:
I also have no need for an optical drive and with most cases I find they look better without one, so again save a few bucks and end up just as happy or happier.


You'll at least need one for OS installation. Are you planning to use an external burner?

Quote:
With my original build the 380 watt was looking like it had about 100watts of extra juice after checking it all on a psu calculator. Does the jump to an i3 and 560 really warrant needing an extra 200 watts?


PSU calculators are grossly unreliable and almost always overestimate actual power requirements. 380W will be very underpowered for any decent GPU. Most good GPUs in that price range - the 560TI, Radeon 6870, etc, require a minimum of 500W, 600W gives you a bit more headroom in case you want to add a second later on.
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September 11, 2012 5:31:09 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Quote:
Why would you go with h77 over b75? I am not seeing any features on the h77 that I would need. I understand it is not a significantly more expensive choice, but if I can save a few bucks and not miss anything why not?


B75 is meant for business machines that use older hardware. It has parallel and serial ports on them and you will never use them as those haven't really been used in 15 years. H77 supports USB 3.0 and SATA 6 for newer hardware and peripherals.

Quote:
I also have no need for an optical drive and with most cases I find they look better without one, so again save a few bucks and end up just as happy or happier.


You'll at least need one for OS installation. Are you planning to use an external burner?

Quote:
With my original build the 380 watt was looking like it had about 100watts of extra juice after checking it all on a psu calculator. Does the jump to an i3 and 560 really warrant needing an extra 200 watts?


PSU calculators are grossly unreliable and almost always overestimate actual power requirements. 380W will be very underpowered for any decent GPU. Most good GPUs in that price range - the 560TI, Radeon 6870, etc, require a minimum of 500W, 600W gives you a bit more headroom in case you want to add a second later on.

1. B75 has USB 3.0 and SATA-600 too. Just only one native SATA-600 port, but that's still enough for an SSD. HDDs are fine on SATA-300 or the extra non-native SATA-600 on the Asrock B75M. That's it's business-oriented doesn't really hurt you otherwise. Well okay, the sound quality is slightly lower with Realtek ALC 662 than 892, but I bet you wouldn't be able to tell the difference.

2. You don't need an optical drive for OS installation, you can use a USB drive.

3. 380W is okay for the HD 7770 he originally picked. For a 7850 you can do with 450-500W with a Core i3 CPU that won't draw much power (and can't be overclocked). The board you suggested only supports Crossfire with 4 lanes for the second card, which isn't great - and it doesn't support SLI at all.
The CX 600 V2 is mediocre quality at best. At least it's cheap though, so I won't call it a poor choice.
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September 11, 2012 5:50:33 PM

Quote:
3. 380W is okay for the HD 7770 he originally picked. For a 7850 you can do with 450-500W with a Core i3 CPU that won't draw much power (and can't be overclocked). The board you suggested only supports Crossfire with 4 lanes for the second card, which isn't great - and it doesn't support SLI at all.


The 7770 isn't really the best choice if gaming is a priority - which is why I've been suggesting far better GPUs. Then the better PSU is needed.

Quote:
3. 380W is okay for the HD 7770 he originally picked. For a 7850 you can do with 450-500W with a Core i3 CPU that won't draw much power (and can't be overclocked). The board you suggested only supports Crossfire with 4 lanes for the second card, which isn't great - and it doesn't support SLI at all.


The i3 doesn't draw much power but the 7850 will.

Quote:
The CX 600 V2 is mediocre quality at best. At least it's cheap though, so I won't call it a poor choice.


Yeah I agree but it's cheap and it won't blow up in your face or short out on you. The equivalent Seasonic is the best, and there's a couple of other good manufacturers in that price range but that will really alter the cost of the build should you go with one of those.
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September 11, 2012 5:56:34 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Quote:
3. 380W is okay for the HD 7770 he originally picked. For a 7850 you can do with 450-500W with a Core i3 CPU that won't draw much power (and can't be overclocked). The board you suggested only supports Crossfire with 4 lanes for the second card, which isn't great - and it doesn't support SLI at all.


The 7770 isn't really the best choice if gaming is a priority - which is why I've been suggesting far better GPUs. Then the better PSU is needed.

Quote:
3. 380W is okay for the HD 7770 he originally picked. For a 7850 you can do with 450-500W with a Core i3 CPU that won't draw much power (and can't be overclocked). The board you suggested only supports Crossfire with 4 lanes for the second card, which isn't great - and it doesn't support SLI at all.


The i3 doesn't draw much power but the 7850 will.

Quote:
The CX 600 V2 is mediocre quality at best. At least it's cheap though, so I won't call it a poor choice.


Yeah I agree but it's cheap and it won't blow up in your face or short out on you. The equivalent Seasonic is the best, and there's a couple of other good manufacturers in that price range but that will really alter the cost of the build should you go with one of those.

I think I have explained this to you before. The CX600 only provides 480W of power, which is still more than enough for a 7850.
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September 11, 2012 6:58:38 PM

OK, so taking this all in, thinking it over for a bit and fidgeting a touch but not much I switched to this set up.


PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/haGM
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/haGM/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/haGM/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i3-3220 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($119.99 @ CompUSA)
Motherboard: ASRock B75M Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($72.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109.99 @ Adorama)
Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7770 GHz Edition 1GB Video Card ($116.97 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Core 1000 MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($37.98 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Antec 380W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($37.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($90.58 @ Amazon)
Total: $626.04
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-11 14:49 EDT-0400)


I know the 7850 is better performing by a good margin, but the power consumption and noise levels on it are higher from what I can tell, and with a smaller case I would be concerned mostly about heat. Is that a valid concern or would it work alright?

As for the storage, we only play one or two games at a time, and can readily backup any we want to external storage or just redownload later.

With no plans to over clock or run multiple video cards, the only possible problem would be that I could see throwing a new card or cpu in the thing in a year or so.

I might go for a larger psu just to make sure we have room for more demanding hardware down the line.

Are there any other cases out there that anyone knows about that are small, minimal on the looks and might work better? the Sugo SG05 and the FT03-mini are both tempting but up the cost a decent amount, but could probably be done in budget?

Thank you all.
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September 11, 2012 8:30:36 PM

Quote:
I know the 7850 is better performing by a good margin, but the power consumption and noise levels on it are higher from what I can tell, and with a smaller case I would be concerned mostly about heat. Is that a valid concern or would it work alright?


No that will work fine. If you set your air flow up correctly that won't be an issue. There's still no point whatsoever in purchasing a 7770 - the 6870 is a few bucks more and completely stomps it on just about every benchmark: http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/536?vs=540

Then that's where the higher wattage PSU will come in handy.

Quote:
As for the storage, we only play one or two games at a time, and can readily backup any we want to external storage or just redownload later.


That's fine. You can always add another HD when you need it.

Quote:
I might go for a larger psu just to make sure we have room for more demanding hardware down the line.


That would be a wise decision - just make sure it's a quality brand like Antec, Seasonic, Corsair, Silverstone, or PC Power & Cooling.

Quote:
Are there any other cases out there that anyone knows about that are small, minimal on the looks and might work better? the Sugo SG05 and the FT03-mini are both tempting but up the cost a decent amount, but could probably be done in budget?


The Fractal Design case is great, maybe in that range there's a couple of Silverstone or Lian-Li cases I could recommend but those will put you over budget.
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September 11, 2012 9:49:27 PM

The 7770 performed poorly early on due to immature drivers. That's improved since, so combined with the price cuts the 7770 is viable today.
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September 11, 2012 11:44:40 PM

turingproof said:
OK, so taking this all in, thinking it over for a bit and fidgeting a touch but not much I switched to this set up.

I would at least change the RAM to 2x4 GB so you get a dual-channel setup.
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September 11, 2012 11:48:24 PM

Sakkura said:
The 7770 performed poorly early on due to immature drivers. That's improved since, so combined with the price cuts the 7770 is viable today.


Yeah I've never been a fan of those Anandtech benchmarks because they don't usually tell you all the variables they used to achieve those numbers. I'd like to see something that puts the 7770 comparable to other GPUs in its' price range.
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September 11, 2012 11:57:05 PM

Sakkura said:
I would at least change the RAM to 2x4 GB so you get a dual-channel setup.



Will do. Thank you.
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