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Will my Logisys 480 watt power supply blow up?

Last response: in Components
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a b ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 2:30:03 AM

I have been told the brand is complete bs (sorry), but I do not have any money to replace it. My setup draws only 270 watt. Will the power supply be ok for a couple months without bursting into flames? Thanks.
a b ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 2:33:53 AM

Yes it will blow up, it's just a matter of time. Your setup may only draw 270 watts, but that PSU is not going to safely deliver 480 watts. PSUs like that are known to catch fire and damage components. I recommend that you replace it with one from SeaSonic, XFX, Enermax, Antec, or Corsair ASAP.
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a b ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 2:39:56 AM

Would a used one be even better than the Logisys?
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January 26, 2013 2:40:02 AM

From looking at this review.

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Logisys-PS600A12...

While not the same model I still wouldn't put anything they make in my computer. With that said do what you got to do.

O to your second question ya I would go for a used one from a reliable manufacturer (and from a good dealer of course).
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a b ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 2:50:19 AM

How is KingWin? I read they are tier 3 and it's solid, but for not high draw situations.
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a b ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 3:55:41 AM

TheN00bBuilder said:
Would a used one be even better than the Logisys?


Yes, provided that it's in decent quality and the seller is somewhat reputable.

I don't have the stigma against used parts that most on these forums do - as long as you're smart about what you buy (and make sure you check it for errors before you buy), then there's nothing wrong with them.

(Continuing to use my 670 after it's been used for five months is no different than buying someone else's that's only been used for five months, provided they treated it right. Same thing goes for power supplies, though you MUST have an altimeter to make sure it's working the way it should.)
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Best solution

a b ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 5:52:17 AM

Power supplies do not blow and rarely catch on fire. The have to have UL approval. Even the cheapest psu have at least a fuse. Think of all the OEM computers that have a poorer psu than your Logisys. What kind of system do you have that draws 270watts and what is it doing when it draws 270W.
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a b ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 7:14:15 AM

Goodeggray said:
Power supplies do not blow and rarely catch on fire. The have to have UL approval. Even the cheapest psu have at least a fuse. Think of all the OEM computers that have a poorer psu than your Logisys. What kind of system do you have that draws 270watts and what is it doing when it draws 270W.


Cheap power supplies like that certainly do catch fire and blow caps or diodes (especially the ones that that are too cheap to use a transformer). When they do, they often take the entire PC with it. OEM PCs from Dell and HP have low wattage power supplies but they're almost always from reasonable manufacturers.
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a c 111 ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 7:58:15 AM

Pinhedd said:
Cheap power supplies like that certainly do catch fire and blow caps or diodes (especially the ones that that are too cheap to use a transformer). When they do, they often take the entire PC with it. OEM PCs from Dell and HP have low wattage power supplies but they're almost always from reasonable manufacturers.

Delta baby! :sol: 
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a b ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 8:17:30 AM

Think of the liability and warning labels PC would have if psu blew up and catch on fir e. Think emachines have high quality psu. What takes out a pc is not a fire from the psu, but the poorly regulated dc current when a psu goes bad.
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January 26, 2013 8:56:17 AM

Good I suggest you look at some reviews/tests of these low quality psu's. Some of them most certainly have caught fire. It's not unheard of.
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a b ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 9:07:54 AM

When they review or test power supplies they stress it to the max these are not real use. They recall battery packs that get too hot when recharging burn may burn your lap. I can see liability lawyers drooling over lawsuits involving psu that blow up or burn up.
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a c 243 ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 10:54:12 AM

Goodeggray said:
When they review or test power supplies they stress it to the max these are not real use. They recall battery packs that get too hot when recharging burn may burn your lap. I can see liability lawyers drooling over lawsuits involving psu that blow up or burn up.

In the case of garbage power supply tests it's usually between 50 and 75% load when they start the fire works, not real use but real world loads
There's no telling wether any psu will blow ( have seen it happen with a Seasonic built Antec ) but buying the cheapest you can increases the risk of catastrophic failure
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a b ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 3:13:12 PM

Best answer selected by TheN00bBuilder.
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a b ) Power supply
January 26, 2013 5:18:33 PM

Goodeggray said:
Think of the liability and warning labels PC would have if psu blew up and catch on fir e. Think emachines have high quality psu. What takes out a pc is not a fire from the psu, but the poorly regulated dc current when a psu goes bad.


I am aware of that, I'm a computer engineer. Many of these cheap PSUs have poor or no over voltage and over current protection. Wear and tear causes a component to flame out which causes a massive current kick which in turn overloads the voltage regulator on the motherboard which in turn blows all the ASICs on the board.

Goodeggray said:
When they review or test power supplies they stress it to the max these are not real use. They recall battery packs that get too hot when recharging burn may burn your lap. I can see liability lawyers drooling over lawsuits involving psu that blow up or burn up.


My PC can easily draw close to a kilowatt under full load.

If a power supply is marketed as 480 watts with 450 watts on the 12 volt rail it damn well better be able to deliver 480 watts with 450 watts on the 12 volt rail. Many cheap PSUs fail to deliver even half their "rated" power before failing. A similar Logisys 600 watt PSU failed to meet the ATX specifications at only 15% load and burned a rectifier at only 58% of its rated capacity.

Your stupid and ill informed "best answer" probably just cost the OP his PC. Congrats.
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