Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Are What is the fastest cpu I could replace an Athlon 64 X2 QL-65 with?

Last response: in CPUs
Share
January 26, 2013 3:37:15 AM

I have an Acer Aspire 5536. It has a AMD Athlon 64 X2 QL-65 http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/K8/AMD-Athlon%2064%20X2%2....
It seems nonsensical to replace a 2.1 GHz cpu with a 2.2 GHz cpu (the maximum speed for the this line).
The question is, can I use one of the s1g3 cpu's as a replacement? I am unaware of the many implications of such a choice are. Let me know if you need any more information to answer the question. Thank you.

MARK
a b à CPUs
January 26, 2013 4:35:49 AM

It is extremely difficult if not impossible to replace a CPU in a laptop. Even if it is somehow possible, the price for carrying out such an upgrade would be extraordinarily high, and in no way could be justifiable.

The only way forward is to sell off your current laptop, after backing up your current data, and then buying a new one.
Given that today's processors are so insanely powerful, you'll be surprised as to how fast even a cheap $500 notebook having a Pentium DC, or AMD A8/A6 chip will be. Cheers :) 
m
0
l
January 26, 2013 8:02:43 AM

Thank you for your input. I am quite confident in my ability to do this upgrade.
While I have no doubt that a 500 dollar laptop would be more powerful, this laptop has cost me 90 dollars (fixing the broken screen and keyboard, and upgrading the ram). Adding in a new cpu will make this laptop cost less than 250 dollars.
m
0
l
Related resources
a b à CPUs
January 26, 2013 9:43:09 AM

Rather than replacing the cpu replace the hhd with a ssd. The hhd a the biggest bottleneck to performance. It will speed boot up a lot.
m
0
l
a c 79 à CPUs
January 26, 2013 10:15:26 AM

offspring17 said:
Thank you for your input. I am quite confident in my ability to do this upgrade.
While I have no doubt that a 500 dollar laptop would be more powerful, this laptop has cost me 90 dollars (fixing the broken screen and keyboard, and upgrading the ram). Adding in a new cpu will make this laptop cost less than 250 dollars.


by quite difficult, it is usually meant that they are soldered in and not a socket, this may mean is it more likely to be impossible than not. Also laptops are very thermally constrained and for cost reasons usually operate right at the limit (if not beyond and relying on throttling) so whatever you put in will have to have a lower TDP or else you'll have trouble. Laptop Bios's are often locked down as well, making this difficult on three fronts. If after the above you still think you are confident then you must know precisely what method has been used, what the excess thermal capacity of the HSF is, and that the BIOS can take it, its a piece of cake if you know all of those.

The SSD upgrade is a good option BUT its possible (probable in fact) that your laptop is not SATA but a variant of IDE and hence you are unlikely to find an SSD for it.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
January 27, 2013 1:18:58 AM

offspring17 said:
Thank you for your input. I am quite confident in my ability to do this upgrade.
While I have no doubt that a 500 dollar laptop would be more powerful, this laptop has cost me 90 dollars (fixing the broken screen and keyboard, and upgrading the ram). Adding in a new cpu will make this laptop cost less than 250 dollars.


Well, like i've already told u before, you can't replace the CPU. However, if u are still hell bent on getting a more powerful one, then try replacing the entire Motherboard with another old one that has a better processor. LOL!!
And after all that, hope the whole thing is more economical than a new $400 low end laptop, which CAN definitely run circles around your "upgraded" $340 crap. Cheers :) 

Sorry if my post was rude, but sometimes that's the only way to get the message through :) 
m
0
l
January 30, 2013 2:52:23 AM

Goodeggray said:
Rather than replacing the cpu replace the hhd with a ssd. The hhd a the biggest bottleneck to performance. It will speed boot up a lot.


This has already been completed. It did help significantly, now the only bottleneck is the cpu.
m
0
l
January 30, 2013 2:56:20 AM

$hawn said:
Well, like i've already told u before, you can't replace the CPU. However, if u are still hell bent on getting a more powerful one, then try replacing the entire Motherboard with another old one that has a better processor. LOL!!
And after all that, hope the whole thing is more economical than a new $400 low end laptop, which CAN definitely run circles around your "upgraded" $340 crap. Cheers :) 

Sorry if my post was rude, but sometimes that's the only way to get the message through :) 


I have replaced many cpu's in laptops before. I am aware that I could replace the entire motherboard. That was not my question.
Allow me to be rude and non-apologetic about it. I am disregarding your answer. Thank you for your input.
m
0
l
January 30, 2013 3:06:38 AM

13thmonkey said:
by quite difficult, it is usually meant that they are soldered in and not a socket, this may mean is it more likely to be impossible than not. Also laptops are very thermally constrained and for cost reasons usually operate right at the limit (if not beyond and relying on throttling) so whatever you put in will have to have a lower TDP or else you'll have trouble. Laptop Bios's are often locked down as well, making this difficult on three fronts. If after the above you still think you are confident then you must know precisely what method has been used, what the excess thermal capacity of the HSF is, and that the BIOS can take it, its a piece of cake if you know all of those.

The SSD upgrade is a good option BUT its possible (probable in fact) that your laptop is not SATA but a variant of IDE and hence you are unlikely to find an SSD for it.


Thank you for this, and I understand that I did not post much background on the computer. This cpu is in a socket held down by a compression plate and a single screw. I am unsure about the thermal output difference and the power consumption difference between s1g2 and s1g3 cpus; this is the nature of my question. As for the bios, I am certain that I can work around it. Do you know where to find information on the limits of the heatsink?

As for a solid state drive, it is already installed, but thank you for the suggestion.

MARK
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
January 30, 2013 3:21:13 AM

The s1g2 and s1g3 tops out at 35 w tdp. Athlon top out at the 2200 Mhz for ql67, Turion x2 ultra lion at 2500Mhz. there is a wiki article on amd mobile cpus.
m
0
l
March 19, 2013 7:06:28 PM

Mark-
Have you gone forward with the install? I came across this thread trying to find if I could do pretty much the same thing, just with a phenom II.
m
0
l
!