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Is this photo real?

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Anonymous
September 23, 2005 1:24:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.

http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg

More about : photo real

Anonymous
September 23, 2005 2:58:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

DD (Rox) wrote:
> In article <dh0150$4iv$1@news1.nivel5.cl>, rcarmi@-no_molesten-puc.cl
> says...
> > yes, it's real
> > http://www.traveljournals.net/pictures/4537.html
> >
> > is called "kjeragbolten"
> >
> > <casioculture@gmail.com> escribió en el mensaje
> > news:1127449488.666995.177950@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> > >
> > > or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
> > >
> > > http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg
>
> Mad bastards.
>

Just looked it up. It's 1000m high (3,281 ft). Sounds like you, DD Rox,
won't do like those guys here

http://tinypic.com/dxjntk.jpg
http://tinypic.com/dxjodi.jpg

Man, my knees hurt just looking at it.


> --
> Look. See. Click. Share.
> www.leica.co.za
> www.dallasdahms.com
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 3:02:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<casioculture@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1127449488.666995.177950@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
>
> http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg
>
Don't worry....With all that gear he's carrying, he's probably got a
parachute........
Related resources
September 23, 2005 7:03:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

casioculture@gmail.com wrote:


> Just looked it up. It's 1000m high (3,281 ft). Sounds like you, DD Rox,
> won't do like those guys here
>
> http://tinypic.com/dxjntk.jpg
>

That's insane..
--

Stacey
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 7:03:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Stacey wrote:
> casioculture@gmail.com wrote:
>
>
>> Just looked it up. It's 1000m high (3,281 ft). Sounds like you, DD
>> Rox, won't do like those guys here
>>
>> http://tinypic.com/dxjntk.jpg
>>
>
> That's insane..

It looks that way, though one must figure that a trendous amount of downward
momentum WAS stopped when that boulder initially fell into position. That
means that short of major erosion, it has more than enough "sticking power"
to remain firmly in place with the additional weight of people and tripods.
:) 

-On the other hand...
....the famous "old man of the mountain" face finally came tumbling down.
-You know--the one on a state quarter?

:-O
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 7:06:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Chris Brown wrote:
> In article <1127449488.666995.177950@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> <casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
>
> Given how much the chock-stone must weigh, I doubt someone standing on it is
> going to make it go anywhere in a hurry.

I'd be more worried about me being thrown off balance by a gust of
wind.
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 7:34:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

casioculture@gmail.com wrote:
> or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
>
> http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg
>
Probably real, and that backpack is probably a parachute....


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
September 23, 2005 11:19:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Stacey wrote:
> casioculture@gmail.com wrote:
>
>
>
>>Just looked it up. It's 1000m high (3,281 ft). Sounds like you, DD Rox,
>>won't do like those guys here
>>
>>http://tinypic.com/dxjntk.jpg
>>
>
>
> That's insane..


Next time I see Darwin, I'm gonna ask him if he's aware of this
situation. Seems there are still some people around that haven't met him.

--
jer
email reply - I am not a 'ten'
September 23, 2005 11:26:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <dh0150$4iv$1@news1.nivel5.cl>, rcarmi@-no_molesten-puc.cl
says...
> yes, it's real
> http://www.traveljournals.net/pictures/4537.html
>
> is called "kjeragbolten"
>
> <casioculture@gmail.com> escribió en el mensaje
> news:1127449488.666995.177950@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> >
> > or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
> >
> > http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg

Mad bastards.

--
Look. See. Click. Share.
www.leica.co.za
www.dallasdahms.com
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 11:59:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>>Next time I see Darwin, I'm gonna ask him if he's aware of this
situation. Seems there are still some people around that haven't met
him. <<

My wife and I spent some time roaming Ireland last summer. The Cliffs
of Moher (spelling?) are cracking and falling hundreds of feet into the
ocean below. You can SEE the cracks with no effort at all. You can
see the rocks below in the surf. You can see the Einsteins standing on
the cracked rock faces of the cliff, looking below at the rocks in the
surf.
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 1:59:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1127449488.666995.177950@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
<casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.

Given how much the chock-stone must weigh, I doubt someone standing on it is
going to make it go anywhere in a hurry.
September 23, 2005 2:20:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1127455137.931744.183130@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com>,
casioculture@gmail.com says...
>
> Just looked it up. It's 1000m high (3,281 ft). Sounds like you, DD Rox,
> won't do like those guys here
>
> http://tinypic.com/dxjntk.jpg
> http://tinypic.com/dxjodi.jpg
>
> Man, my knees hurt just looking at it.

Definitely not. I get nervous travelling up mountain passes in cars!

It's not that I am afraid of heights - I'm afraid of falling to my death
from great heights!

--
Look. See. Click. Share.
www.leica.co.za
www.dallasdahms.com
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 2:20:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In rec.photo.digital DD (Rox) <roxy@empirerods.com> wrote:
: In article <1127455137.931744.183130@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com>,
: casioculture@gmail.com says...
: >
: > Just looked it up. It's 1000m high (3,281 ft). Sounds like you, DD
: > Rox, won't do like those guys here
: >
: > http://tinypic.com/dxjntk.jpg
: > http://tinypic.com/dxjodi.jpg
: >
: > Man, my knees hurt just looking at it.

: Definitely not. I get nervous travelling up mountain passes in cars!

: It's not that I am afraid of heights - I'm afraid of falling to my
: death from great heights!

As the old saying goes, it isnt the fall that gets you, its the sudden
stop. :) 

Actually these photos aren't too scary, but I remember one vacation to
Yosemite when I was on an overlook from far over the valley floor. At the
end of the path there was a cliff that dropped vertically from a sharp
edge. At that point there was a railing that you could lean against. But
the railing was angled so that if you leaned firmly aginst it your head
(and part of your upper body) was extending out over the drop. You could
look several hundred feet STRAIGHT DOWN. Now THAT was scary. I loved the
view! :) 

Actually I don't have a problem with such a viewpoint, but am always
worried about dropping a camera or loosing my glasses and so I'm always so
concerned about dropping something I rarely notice the precarious
position of my body. :) 

Randy

==========
Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL
September 23, 2005 3:29:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <dh0fbu$gi2$1@wildfire.prairienet.org>,
rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org says...
> As the old saying goes, it isnt the fall that gets you, its the sudden
> stop. :) 
>
> Actually these photos aren't too scary, but I remember one vacation to
> Yosemite when I was on an overlook from far over the valley floor. At the
> end of the path there was a cliff that dropped vertically from a sharp
> edge. At that point there was a railing that you could lean against. But
> the railing was angled so that if you leaned firmly aginst it your head
> (and part of your upper body) was extending out over the drop. You could
> look several hundred feet STRAIGHT DOWN. Now THAT was scary. I loved the
> view! :) 
>
> Actually I don't have a problem with such a viewpoint, but am always
> worried about dropping a camera or loosing my glasses and so I'm always so
> concerned about dropping something I rarely notice the precarious
> position of my body. :) 

No thanks. It's funny though, I can handle heights when I am inside
something. When I first got married we lived in a flat on the 16th floor
of a 32 story building. I had no problem sticking my head out of the
window, even from the top. However, growing up as a kid we used to live
in a building where the washlines were on the roof which was only 13
floors up. There was a wall around the entire roof that was the same
height as the balconies of all the apartments, but I couldn't look out
over the edge. My legs would give way (reminds me of an episode of Mr.
Bean!).

Cable cars and planes I'm fine in too.

--
Look. See. Click. Share.
www.leica.co.za
www.dallasdahms.com
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 3:48:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

DD (Rox) wrote:
> In article <dh0fbu$gi2$1@wildfire.prairienet.org>,
> rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org says...

> No thanks. It's funny though, I can handle heights when I am inside
> something. When I first got married we lived in a flat on the 16th floor
> of a 32 story building. I had no problem sticking my head out of the
> window, even from the top. However, growing up as a kid we used to live
> in a building where the washlines were on the roof which was only 13
> floors up. There was a wall around the entire roof that was the same
> height as the balconies of all the apartments, but I couldn't look out
> over the edge. My legs would give way (reminds me of an episode of Mr.
> Bean!).
>
> Cable cars and planes I'm fine in too.

Reminds me of a photo I saw in a magazine a while ago. It was an old
one, from the 30s, and showed steel erectors working on the Empire State
buiding in New York. It was lunchtime and they were sitting on a steel
beam sticking out into empty space about zillion feet up, eating sandwiches!
Gaaah! I felt queasy just looking at the picture. Great bit of
photography actually, the image really captured what it was like to be
up there. At least I think he did, because I am never going to find out
for myself. :-)

Aeroplanes are different somehow, aren't they? I can look out and see
the tiny specks that are cars etc. from thousands of feet up and not
worry at all.
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 4:27:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1127469997.899137.24050@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
<casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>Chris Brown wrote:
>> In article <1127449488.666995.177950@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
>> <casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
>> >
>> >or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
>>
>> Given how much the chock-stone must weigh, I doubt someone standing on it is
>> going to make it go anywhere in a hurry.
>
>I'd be more worried about me being thrown off balance by a gust of
>wind.

Do you find this happens a lot? I mean, it would seem to be just as likely
when walking next to a busy road.
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 5:33:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ron Hunter wrote:


> Probably real, and that backpack is probably a parachute....
>
>

Not that I parachute, but I don't think it is, it looks more like rucksack
straps than a parachute harness. He's got no helmet and and the belt part
of the rucksack is undone.

--
http://www.petezilla.co.uk
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 5:34:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

casioculture@gmail.com wrote:


> I'd be more worried about me being thrown off balance by a gust of
> wind.

I'd be creating my own gusts of wind if you tried putting me on that...

--
http://www.petezilla.co.uk
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 6:01:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Chris Brown wrote:
> In article <1127469997.899137.24050@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> <casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >Chris Brown wrote:
> >> In article <1127449488.666995.177950@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> >> <casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
> >> >
> >> >or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
> >>
> >> Given how much the chock-stone must weigh, I doubt someone standing on it is
> >> going to make it go anywhere in a hurry.
> >
> >I'd be more worried about me being thrown off balance by a gust of
> >wind.
>
> Do you find this happens a lot? I mean, it would seem to be just as likely
> when walking next to a busy road.

A busy road doesn't cause my legs to mysteriously lose their bone and
cartilage. :-)
September 23, 2005 6:05:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

casioculture@gmail.com wrote:

> or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
>
> http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg
>

Looks like the boulder is wedged quite solidly in between the two rock
faces. Same principle as the cam wedges climbers now use instead of pitons.
September 23, 2005 6:09:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Jer wrote:

> Stacey wrote:
>
>> casioculture@gmail.com wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>> Just looked it up. It's 1000m high (3,281 ft). Sounds like you, DD Rox,
>>> won't do like those guys here
>>>
>>> http://tinypic.com/dxjntk.jpg
>>>
>>
>>
>> That's insane..
>
>
>
> Next time I see Darwin, I'm gonna ask him if he's aware of this
> situation. Seems there are still some people around that haven't met him.
>

Apparently it's also a popular spot for base jumping.
September 23, 2005 6:11:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <fYRYe.19094$6p.9595@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net>, jrf1@ntlworld.com
says...

> Reminds me of a photo I saw in a magazine a while ago. It was an old
> one, from the 30s, and showed steel erectors working on the Empire State
> buiding in New York. It was lunchtime and they were sitting on a steel
> beam sticking out into empty space about zillion feet up, eating sandwiches!
> Gaaah! I felt queasy just looking at the picture. Great bit of
> photography actually, the image really captured what it was like to be
> up there. At least I think he did, because I am never going to find out
> for myself. :-)

Ha! Believe it or not we have two large prints of those images framed in
our boardroom! The second one shows the same guys taking a nap on the
girders!!

--
Look. See. Click. Share.
www.leica.co.za
www.dallasdahms.com
September 23, 2005 6:12:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Chris Brown wrote:

> In article <1127469997.899137.24050@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> <casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>Chris Brown wrote:
>>
>>>In article <1127449488.666995.177950@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
>>> <casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>>or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
>>>
>>>Given how much the chock-stone must weigh, I doubt someone standing on it is
>>>going to make it go anywhere in a hurry.
>>
>>I'd be more worried about me being thrown off balance by a gust of
>>wind.
>
>
> Do you find this happens a lot? I mean, it would seem to be just as likely
> when walking next to a busy road.

Most busy roads don't have a thousand foot drop just inches away.
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 7:17:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mark²,
Damn, he should have been using a carbon fiber tripod. :-)
Paul

Mark² wrote:

snipped

> -On the other hand...
> ...the famous "old man of the mountain" face finally came tumbling down.
> -You know--the one on a state quarter?
>
> :-O
>
>
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 7:19:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Rox,
It's not the falling.......it's the sudden stop. :-)
Paul

DD (Rox) wrote:

snipped

>
> It's not that I am afraid of heights - I'm afraid of falling to my death
> from great heights!
>
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 7:27:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <b3UYe.71953$Jp.1561393@twister.southeast.rr.com>,
no_name <no_name@no.where.invalid> wrote:
>Chris Brown wrote:
>
>> In article <1127469997.899137.24050@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
>> <casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>I'd be more worried about me being thrown off balance by a gust of
>>>wind.
>>
>> Do you find this happens a lot? I mean, it would seem to be just as likely
>> when walking next to a busy road.
>
>Most busy roads don't have a thousand foot drop just inches away.

A bus going over your head leaves you just as dead.
September 23, 2005 9:26:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Chris Brown wrote:

> In article <b3UYe.71953$Jp.1561393@twister.southeast.rr.com>,
> no_name <no_name@no.where.invalid> wrote:
>
>>Chris Brown wrote:
>>
>>
>>>In article <1127469997.899137.24050@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
>>> <casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>>I'd be more worried about me being thrown off balance by a gust of
>>>>wind.
>>>
>>>Do you find this happens a lot? I mean, it would seem to be just as likely
>>>when walking next to a busy road.
>>
>>Most busy roads don't have a thousand foot drop just inches away.
>
>
> A bus going over your head leaves you just as dead.

If you're dumb enough to play out in the traffic.
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 9:49:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
news:p YNYe.24537$sx2.9201@fed1read02...
> Stacey wrote:
>> casioculture@gmail.com wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Just looked it up. It's 1000m high (3,281 ft). Sounds like you, DD
>>> Rox, won't do like those guys here
>>>
>>> http://tinypic.com/dxjntk.jpg
>>>
>>
>> That's insane..
>
> It looks that way, though one must figure that a trendous amount of
> downward momentum WAS stopped when that boulder initially fell into
> position. That means that short of major erosion, it has more than enough
> "sticking power" to remain firmly in place with the additional weight of
> people and tripods. :) 
>
> -On the other hand...
> ...the famous "old man of the mountain" face finally came tumbling down.
> -You know--the one on a state quarter?
>
> :-O
>
And then, there is always the possibility of an earthquake.......
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 9:57:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Randy Berbaum" <rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org> wrote in message
news:D h0fbu$gi2$1@wildfire.prairienet.org...
> In rec.photo.digital DD (Rox) <roxy@empirerods.com> wrote:
> : In article <1127455137.931744.183130@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com>,
> : casioculture@gmail.com says...
> : >
> : > Just looked it up. It's 1000m high (3,281 ft). Sounds like you, DD
> : > Rox, won't do like those guys here
> : >
> : > http://tinypic.com/dxjntk.jpg
> : > http://tinypic.com/dxjodi.jpg
> : >
> : > Man, my knees hurt just looking at it.
>
> : Definitely not. I get nervous travelling up mountain passes in cars!
>
> : It's not that I am afraid of heights - I'm afraid of falling to my
> : death from great heights!
>
> As the old saying goes, it isnt the fall that gets you, its the sudden
> stop. :) 
>
> Actually these photos aren't too scary, but I remember one vacation to
> Yosemite when I was on an overlook from far over the valley floor. At the
> end of the path there was a cliff that dropped vertically from a sharp
> edge. At that point there was a railing that you could lean against. But
> the railing was angled so that if you leaned firmly aginst it your head
> (and part of your upper body) was extending out over the drop. You could
> look several hundred feet STRAIGHT DOWN. Now THAT was scary. I loved the
> view! :) 
>
> Actually I don't have a problem with such a viewpoint, but am always
> worried about dropping a camera or loosing my glasses and so I'm always so
> concerned about dropping something I rarely notice the precarious
> position of my body. :) 
>
> Randy

And when you lose your glasses, you can't even watch them falling.....:^)
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 10:00:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"DD (Rox)" <roxy@empirerods.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1d9df76e350ed0e5989742@news.mweb.co.za...
> In article <dh0fbu$gi2$1@wildfire.prairienet.org>,
> rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org says...
>> As the old saying goes, it isnt the fall that gets you, its the sudden
>> stop. :) 
>>
>> Actually these photos aren't too scary, but I remember one vacation to
>> Yosemite when I was on an overlook from far over the valley floor. At the
>> end of the path there was a cliff that dropped vertically from a sharp
>> edge. At that point there was a railing that you could lean against. But
>> the railing was angled so that if you leaned firmly aginst it your head
>> (and part of your upper body) was extending out over the drop. You could
>> look several hundred feet STRAIGHT DOWN. Now THAT was scary. I loved the
>> view! :) 
>>
>> Actually I don't have a problem with such a viewpoint, but am always
>> worried about dropping a camera or loosing my glasses and so I'm always
>> so
>> concerned about dropping something I rarely notice the precarious
>> position of my body. :) 
>
> No thanks. It's funny though, I can handle heights when I am inside
> something. When I first got married we lived in a flat on the 16th floor
> of a 32 story building. I had no problem sticking my head out of the
> window, even from the top. However, growing up as a kid we used to live
> in a building where the washlines were on the roof which was only 13
> floors up. There was a wall around the entire roof that was the same
> height as the balconies of all the apartments, but I couldn't look out
> over the edge. My legs would give way (reminds me of an episode of Mr.
> Bean!).
>
> Cable cars and planes I'm fine in too.

With me, I can't go near the edge of man made objects, like office
buildings, but natural heights, like the edge of the grand canyon, I am OK
with.....It's an irrational fear. Common sense doesn't seem to figure into
the mix......
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 10:04:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"DD (Rox)" <roxy@empirerods.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1d9e1d535e6c8596989744@news.mweb.co.za...
> In article <fYRYe.19094$6p.9595@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net>, jrf1@ntlworld.com
> says...
>
>> Reminds me of a photo I saw in a magazine a while ago. It was an old
>> one, from the 30s, and showed steel erectors working on the Empire State
>> buiding in New York. It was lunchtime and they were sitting on a steel
>> beam sticking out into empty space about zillion feet up, eating
>> sandwiches!
>> Gaaah! I felt queasy just looking at the picture. Great bit of
>> photography actually, the image really captured what it was like to be
>> up there. At least I think he did, because I am never going to find out
>> for myself. :-)
>
> Ha! Believe it or not we have two large prints of those images framed in
> our boardroom! The second one shows the same guys taking a nap on the
> girders!!

There was a picture story in Life Mag many years ago, of a group of 5 or 6
Mohawk Indians who worked building office buildings....They were supposed to
be, "Sure footed". (whatever that means) Anyway, several years later, I read
that every one of them had fallen to their deaths during the intervening
years......
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 10:07:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Chris Brown" <cpbrown@ntlworld.no_uce_please.com> wrote in message
news:1avc03-dt9.ln1@narcissus.dyndns.org...
> In article <1127449488.666995.177950@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> <casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
>
> Given how much the chock-stone must weigh, I doubt someone standing on it
> is
> going to make it go anywhere in a hurry.
>
You never know.....Have you ever heard of the straw that broke the camel's
back?
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 10:17:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Chris Loffredo wrote:
> casioculture@gmail.com wrote:
> > or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
> >
> > http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg
> >
>
> The boulder has been jammed there for (tens of-) thousands of years: The
> extra weight of one or two people isn't going to change anything soon.
>

I'm not worried about the boulder itself moving. Look at this pic
http://tinypic.com/dxjntk.jpg
It's clear from the tripod legs that the flat surface is minimal and
the top of the boulder is curved and slick. Just a little dew on that
algae and it's a slippery slop!

> There is more chance of your car loosing a wheel at high speed on the
> highway - but then that is *normal/acceptable*.
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 10:28:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <PUWYe.48764$ua.2350902@twister.southeast.rr.com>,
no_name <no_name@no.where.invalid> wrote:
>Chris Brown wrote:
>
>> In article <b3UYe.71953$Jp.1561393@twister.southeast.rr.com>,
>> no_name <no_name@no.where.invalid> wrote:
>>
>>>Chris Brown wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>In article <1127469997.899137.24050@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
>>>> <casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>I'd be more worried about me being thrown off balance by a gust of
>>>>>wind.
>>>>
>>>>Do you find this happens a lot? I mean, it would seem to be just as likely
>>>>when walking next to a busy road.
>>>
>>>Most busy roads don't have a thousand foot drop just inches away.
>>
>> A bus going over your head leaves you just as dead.
>
>If you're dumb enough to play out in the traffic.

The traffic is on the road, you were walking next to it, the wind blew you
off bal...

....oh sod it, life's too short.
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 10:28:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Chris Brown" <cpbrown@ntlworld.no_uce_please.com> wrote in message
news:jerd03-pua.ln1@narcissus.dyndns.org...
> In article <PUWYe.48764$ua.2350902@twister.southeast.rr.com>,
> no_name <no_name@no.where.invalid> wrote:
>>Chris Brown wrote:
>>
>>> In article <b3UYe.71953$Jp.1561393@twister.southeast.rr.com>,
>>> no_name <no_name@no.where.invalid> wrote:
>>>
>>>>Chris Brown wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>In article <1127469997.899137.24050@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
>>>>> <casioculture@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>I'd be more worried about me being thrown off balance by a gust of
>>>>>>wind.
>>>>>
>>>>>Do you find this happens a lot? I mean, it would seem to be just as
>>>>>likely
>>>>>when walking next to a busy road.
>>>>
>>>>Most busy roads don't have a thousand foot drop just inches away.
>>>
>>> A bus going over your head leaves you just as dead.
>>
>>If you're dumb enough to play out in the traffic.
>
> The traffic is on the road, you were walking next to it, the wind blew you
> off bal...
>
> ...oh sod it, life's too short.
>
Well, it is an irrational fear. Fear of tigers is not a phobia......
September 24, 2005 1:26:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mark² wrote:

> Stacey wrote:
>> casioculture@gmail.com wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Just looked it up. It's 1000m high (3,281 ft). Sounds like you, DD
>>> Rox, won't do like those guys here
>>>
>>> http://tinypic.com/dxjntk.jpg
>>>
>>
>> That's insane..
>
> It looks that way, though one must figure that a trendous amount of
> downward
> momentum WAS stopped when that boulder initially fell into position.

It's INSANE to stand that close to a 1000m drop! Guess I have a fear of
hights but to free stand on something like that when a good gust of wind
could blow you off doesn't seem real bright...


--

Stacey
September 24, 2005 1:28:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

wilt wrote:

>>>Next time I see Darwin, I'm gonna ask him if he's aware of this
> situation. Seems there are still some people around that haven't met
> him. <<
>
> My wife and I spent some time roaming Ireland last summer. The Cliffs
> of Moher (spelling?) are cracking and falling hundreds of feet into the
> ocean below. You can SEE the cracks with no effort at all. You can
> see the rocks below in the surf. You can see the Einsteins standing on
> the cracked rock faces of the cliff, looking below at the rocks in the
> surf.


Exactly.
--

Stacey
Anonymous
September 24, 2005 1:28:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Stacey wrote:
> wilt wrote:
>
>>>> Next time I see Darwin, I'm gonna ask him if he's aware of this
>> situation. Seems there are still some people around that haven't met
>> him. <<
>>
>> My wife and I spent some time roaming Ireland last summer. The
>> Cliffs of Moher (spelling?) are cracking and falling hundreds of
>> feet into the ocean below. You can SEE the cracks with no effort at
>> all. You can see the rocks below in the surf. You can see the
>> Einsteins standing on the cracked rock faces of the cliff, looking
>> below at the rocks in the surf.
>
>
> Exactly.

It would probably be just as likely that you'd be struck by lightning on
that high, exposed spot as it would that you'd the one-in-a-million guy to
just happen to be there when the rock gives way.
September 24, 2005 4:20:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Anyone know how many people have died by falling off this rock?



<casioculture@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1127449488.666995.177950@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
>
> http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg
>
Anonymous
September 24, 2005 5:57:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

casioculture@gmail.com wrote:
> or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
>
> http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg
>

The boulder has been jammed there for (tens of-) thousands of years: The
extra weight of one or two people isn't going to change anything soon.

There is more chance of your car loosing a wheel at high speed on the
highway - but then that is *normal/acceptable*.
Anonymous
September 24, 2005 2:39:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

casioculture@gmail.com wrote:
> Chris Loffredo wrote:
>
>>casioculture@gmail.com wrote:
>>
>>>or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
>>>
>>>http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg
>>>
>>
>>The boulder has been jammed there for (tens of-) thousands of years: The
>>extra weight of one or two people isn't going to change anything soon.
>>
>
>
> I'm not worried about the boulder itself moving. Look at this pic
> http://tinypic.com/dxjntk.jpg
> It's clear from the tripod legs that the flat surface is minimal and
> the top of the boulder is curved and slick. Just a little dew on that
> algae and it's a slippery slop!
>

Being a mountain climber, I've stood on/passed over equivalent sitations
many times. You get a good idea of how much traction you can expect
there by the nearby rocks: It's really no different from any other
narrow and exposed passage.
Anonymous
September 25, 2005 1:00:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

DD <roxy@empirerods.com> wrote:

>rberbaum@bluestem.prairienet.org says...
>> Actually I don't have a problem with such a viewpoint, but am always
>> worried about dropping a camera or loosing my glasses and so I'm always so
>> concerned about dropping something I rarely notice the precarious
>> position of my body. :) 

....

>No thanks. It's funny though, I can handle heights when I am inside
>something.

The fear of heights isn't actually a fear of the height itself,
it's a fear you are going to throw yourself off.

--
Ken Tough
Anonymous
September 25, 2005 11:46:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Rodrigo C. wrote:
> yes, it's real
> http://www.traveljournals.net/pictures/4537.html
>
> is called "kjeragbolten"
>
> <casioculture@gmail.com> escribió en el mensaje
> news:1127449488.666995.177950@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> >
> > or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
> >
> > http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg
> >

Where is "Kjeragbolten" located? I might just take a trip out there one
day.

RobGN.
Anonymous
September 25, 2005 11:55:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 22 Sep 2005 21:24:48 -0700, casioculture@gmail.com wrote:

>
>or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
>
>http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg

I envision Wyle E. Coyote standing there. The rock will fall and
remaining on top, Wyle E. will wipe his brow in relief.

But wait!

The rock will suddenly tip over and Wyle E. will find himself falling
underneath it at a faster rate (blame it on WB physics!)

He will hit first of course, and after the puff of dust clears he will
again wipe his brow in relief. Until he notices a growing shadow and
looks up. In desperation, he will open that tiny umbrella...

That's all, folks!
Anonymous
September 25, 2005 11:55:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

richardsfault wrote:
> On 22 Sep 2005 21:24:48 -0700, casioculture@gmail.com wrote:
>
>>
>> or is it photoshopped? My knees soften just looking at it.
>>
>> http://tinypic.com/dxirlj.jpg
>
> I envision Wyle E. Coyote standing there. The rock will fall and
> remaining on top, Wyle E. will wipe his brow in relief.
>
> But wait!
>
> The rock will suddenly tip over and Wyle E. will find himself falling
> underneath it at a faster rate (blame it on WB physics!)
>
> He will hit first of course, and after the puff of dust clears he will
> again wipe his brow in relief. Until he notices a growing shadow and
> looks up. In desperation, he will open that tiny umbrella...
>
> That's all, folks!

Ah, but he's never the worse for wear...
....In a matter of moments, he'll be pouring a pile of iron bird-seed and
pulling out his Acme Super-Magnet (only to attract a freight train, at which
point he uses another of his 9 million lives)...then donning his
rocket-powered roller-skates...then the rocket back-pack, etc.

You gotta love his tenacity.
:) 
!