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Need some help cooling my pc

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September 13, 2012 1:53:39 PM

Hello, everyone I just bought this computer from microcenter

http://www.microcenter.com/product/388813/G213_Desktop_...

and I also bought three of these kaze 3,000 rpm fans

http://www.microcenter.com/product/274204/Ultra_Kaze_12...

and I really need some help. The case I have it has space for 2 120mm fans on the side of the case, the front intake is a 120mm led fan at 1,200 rpm and the back of the case has a space for a fan. Now what I'm asking is what would be the best way to setup the cooling in my case and which directions do I aim my fans(sticker pointing to the inside or outside of the case.)

This is how I have it setup right now. The front fan(the 1,200rpm) is the fan that came with the case and I left it there, the sticker is pointing outside of the case. The side fans are two of my kaze fans(3,000rpm) and both of thier stickers are pointing to the outside of the case. Then my back fan(kaze 3,000rpm) sticker is pointing outside the case. Can you please help me I want my cpu to be as cool as possible

More about : cooling

September 13, 2012 5:54:43 PM

Not sure what a sticker is, but if it shows the direction of airflow you have a problem. The best way to check the airflow is to put your hand in front of the fan and see if it blows on you. Most fans have an arrow engraved / in relief on one of the edges that shows which way the wind is blowing.

There are several schools of thought on how to set up fans, but what they all have in common is that air is pushed in somewhere and pulled out somewhere else. If those stickers indicate the direction of the airflow, then you have four fans blowing out and none blowing in, which would be kind of silly. All the air going into your case would be leaking in through holes.

The front fan should be blowing INTO the case. The back fan (near the top, I hope) should be blowing OUT OF the case. If you add two fans on the side blowing OUT OF the case, where will they get air to blow out? One fan in, four out (assuming that your power supply has a fan). Some people find this acceptable; others will tell you to add more intake fans. I have two intake and three exhaust.

The intake fan(s) should be in one area, the outflow fans in another. The case should be set up so that air coming in the intakes can blow over the components to be cooled and then out the outflows. If the intakes are next to the outflows, you get no air movement in the case. If the intakes are front bottom and the outflows are back bottom, the middle and top of the case get no flow.

Make sense?


Oh - if the machine is already cool enough the way it shipped, then just don't add any more noisemakers to it.
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September 13, 2012 6:31:54 PM

try to clean out some dust, then stick 2 exhaust fans on the side. Solved my problem.
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September 13, 2012 6:38:04 PM

I think the sticker he refers to is the one on the back of the motor, if that is pointing inside, the fan is blowing into your case, if its against the case and you can't see the sticker, its blowing out,
general guideline is front,base and side fans are intake, roof and rear are exhaust

Moto
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September 13, 2012 6:44:05 PM

You like exhaust on the side panel? I decided I wanted to go for positive air pressure in my case to keep dust out, so I added my side fans as intakes. My case has a top exhaust, rear exhaust, and is exhausting its air outside of the case from the PSU. My front panel and 2 sides act as intakes giving me an overall positive air ratio which pushes air out of the cracks in your case preventing dust from entering! (when your intakes are properly filtered that is). Because of the way my side panel fans would orient over the components in my case I decided I did not want them to be exhausts (my cpu cooler has a fan facing the side panel blowing down onto the heatsink and mobo).
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September 13, 2012 8:25:30 PM

I tried sides as intake and meh. Overall temp is cooler when they exhaust air.
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September 13, 2012 8:35:55 PM

You want front and side fans to suck fresh air into the case. The power supply, video card and exhaust fan on the back of the case blow the hot air out the back.
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September 13, 2012 8:45:41 PM

dingo07 said:
You want front and side fans to suck fresh air into the case. The power supply, video card and exhaust fan on the back of the case blow the hot air out the back.


GOD i hope your cabling looks better than that.

As previously stated, 2 front are intake, back is exhaust, side can be either depending on your needs. With SLI intake might be better, although you should test each for a decent amount of time to see which is better. And if you ever get an aftermarket CPU cooler make sure it blows out the back exhaust.
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September 13, 2012 8:51:29 PM

yarmock said:
GOD i hope your cabling looks better than that.

As previously stated, 2 front are intake, back is exhaust, side can be either depending on your needs. With SLI intake might be better, although you should test each for a decent amount of time to see which is better. And if you ever get an aftermarket CPU cooler make sure it blows out the back exhaust.

Any reason you quoted my post? And what cabling are you talking about...?
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September 13, 2012 8:56:23 PM

dingo07 said:
Any reason you quoted my post? And what cabling are you talking about...?


Sorry no reason to quote yours, just using as reference as I agreed with it. Nothing negative.

Also the cabling im refering to is the one in the picture of his pc from the link he provided.

Sorry for the confusion :) 
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September 13, 2012 9:04:52 PM

@darkshak - once you get the fans situated, download and install this - http://event.msi.com/vga/afterburner/download.htm

You are going to want to set up a custom fan curve for both of your video cards because the "sandwiched" card will run between 5-10C hotter because of the close proximity to the other board

------

Not to be a bummer, but you might want to check the specs of the power supply and make sure it's from a reputable brand, and should at least be 80Plus Bronze certified
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September 14, 2012 4:27:48 AM

overall case temp is what matters
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September 14, 2012 5:16:14 AM

darkshak

I purchased a similar PowerSpec PC from Micro Center a few weeks ago, the G181, with an Intel DZ68DB mainboard, rated elsewhere on Tom's . The case appears to be the same as yours, not the internals.

I had some trouble with overheating after I replaced the original ATI HD 6670 with an Nvidia GTX 560 ti (aggressive factory overclock), and installed a new 80+ power supply.

The intake fan is on the front, and blows through the disk drives, and into the main part of the case by the SATA cable sockets. The exhaust fan is in the rear behind the CPU cooler, at the opposite end of the board. In between these fans is where the PCI-e socket is located. There is no provision for a second front fan, and nowhere to mount a second in the rear. The top is solid. The left side of the case has "flexible" mounting holes for at least two 120mm fans. By flexible, I mean that you are not limited to a single position. You can skew the fan left, right, and to a slight extent, up and down the side.

On my Intel board, the north bridge has a relatively small heat sink. This sits almost under the video card. It is known to overheat (along with other nearby important components) if a tower cooler is installed instead of a downdraft. I have not replaced the stock cooler yet, but plan to use the best possible downdraft style soon.

In testing, I found my box to be too hot. I installed an Antec 3 speed 120mm case fan (Tri-cool) on the side, blowing out. This kept my video card cooler than before, but the processor temps headed for the sky under load. Blowing in, with fan blowing down on the video card was the best compromise. I have the Antec on the middle setting. It is the loudest fan I can hear, until the 560 Ti gets loaded, and then it takes over as the noise leader.

As it stands, I need more cooling, even running my 2600K stock. The intake fan remains at the original speed, and the exhaust fan picked up 25% most likely due to the additional intake giving it a boost. If a new CPU cooler does not cure the problems, I would look to replace the intake and exhaust fans with brand name 120mm, high static pressure models, with low noise figures.

Hope this gives you some ideas.

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September 14, 2012 5:30:07 AM

at the risk of sounding overly practical and cheap, has anyone tried opening the side of the case? I kept an old case open for a couple of years, it kept everything quiet and cool. Doing the same now, same results.
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September 14, 2012 4:05:14 PM

cgner said:
at the risk of sounding overly practical and cheap, has anyone tried opening the side of the case? I kept an old case open for a couple of years, it kept everything quiet and cool. Doing the same now, same results.


In a word, "cats."
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September 14, 2012 4:30:29 PM

And you end up cleaning out lots of dust! And yes, cats...
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September 14, 2012 5:00:28 PM

Meh, I didnt get that much dust into it. Cleaned it once in 5 years, it was worth it.
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September 14, 2012 7:24:34 PM

^lol funny pic. I can understand though, cats loooooooooove warm places.
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September 14, 2012 7:47:26 PM

I just get fur in my radiators, the blast of air keeps them away except in hot weather when they love it :) 

guess which rad is by the wall and which is deskside :) 
Moto
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September 14, 2012 8:18:53 PM

haha thats funny. I used to have a dog that loved sitting in a mud puddle when it was hot, kinda like a pig.
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September 21, 2012 12:31:29 AM

RonKinNJ said:
darkshak

I purchased a similar PowerSpec PC from Micro Center a few weeks ago, the G181, with an Intel DZ68DB mainboard, rated elsewhere on Tom's . The case appears to be the same as yours, not the internals.

I had some trouble with overheating after I replaced the original ATI HD 6670 with an Nvidia GTX 560 ti (aggressive factory overclock), and installed a new 80+ power supply.

The intake fan is on the front, and blows through the disk drives, and into the main part of the case by the SATA cable sockets. The exhaust fan is in the rear behind the CPU cooler, at the opposite end of the board. In between these fans is where the PCI-e socket is located. There is no provision for a second front fan, and nowhere to mount a second in the rear. The top is solid. The left side of the case has "flexible" mounting holes for at least two 120mm fans. By flexible, I mean that you are not limited to a single position. You can skew the fan left, right, and to a slight extent, up and down the side.

On my Intel board, the north bridge has a relatively small heat sink. This sits almost under the video card. It is known to overheat (along with other nearby important components) if a tower cooler is installed instead of a downdraft. I have not replaced the stock cooler yet, but plan to use the best possible downdraft style soon.

In testing, I found my box to be too hot. I installed an Antec 3 speed 120mm case fan (Tri-cool) on the side, blowing out. This kept my video card cooler than before, but the processor temps headed for the sky under load. Blowing in, with fan blowing down on the video card was the best compromise. I have the Antec on the middle setting. It is the loudest fan I can hear, until the 560 Ti gets loaded, and then it takes over as the noise leader.

As it stands, I need more cooling, even running my 2600K stock. The intake fan remains at the original speed, and the exhaust fan picked up 25% most likely due to the additional intake giving it a boost. If a new CPU cooler does not cure the problems, I would look to replace the intake and exhaust fans with brand name 120mm, high static pressure models, with low noise figures.

Hope this gives you some ideas.

Im going to post pics of the inside of the computer. Oh and to revise my post everything is pretty much cool except my gtx 550 ti sli its getting to like 94 degrees celcius on ultra settings after like 10 mins.
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September 21, 2012 12:33:23 AM

lololol at all the comments about cats. "Who doesn't have add"-Tyler the creator
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September 21, 2012 12:45:15 AM

dingo07 said:
@darkshak - once you get the fans situated, download and install this - http://event.msi.com/vga/afterburner/download.htm

You are going to want to set up a custom fan curve for both of your video cards because the "sandwiched" card will run between 5-10C hotter because of the close proximity to the other board

------

Not to be a bummer, but you might want to check the specs of the power supply and make sure it's from a reputable brand, and should at least be 80Plus Bronze certified


I did not do the fan curve, I basically just set it for the fan to be on 100 percent all the time. Dang I just opened my case and the cable management it terrible. I gotta switch some stuff up.
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September 21, 2012 5:42:28 AM

darkshak

Our case is a "Vortex 3620" listed under various manufacturers. In mine, the case fans are labeled "Maxcube."

In my bios, under Fan control and monitoring, the default automatic fan duty cycle is 30/100. Changed it to 85/100 and the NON PWM case fans jumped from 400 rpm to 700 rpm. Nothing changes the CPU fan, which runs around 2800 rpm, idle or load, doesn't matter.

Try changing the duty cycle on your case fans, and see if it helps the video card. I'm tired, and have already lost three messages due to operator error in Linux. I will expand on my experiments in cooling tomorrow. I do see change, but not enough.

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Best solution

September 21, 2012 6:52:09 AM

/Passes out at sight of cables....

They
Need
Sorting!

Moto
Share
September 21, 2012 12:10:51 PM

Motopsychojdn said:
/Passes out at sight of cables....

They
Need
Sorting!

Moto


I mean there no where to really put the cables :(  but I did open the side panel and moved some cables around the cable management area. Ill post another pic when I get home I have class until 2pm est.
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September 21, 2012 1:22:04 PM

Just as an update here is my current setup (case an program wise)
Ill use a list

Front bottom intake: Led 120mm intake came with the case

Back top exaust: (not the top of the case,the back of the case)3000rpm ultra kaze 120mm

Side bottom intake: (over my gtx 550ti sli)3000rpm ultra kaze 120mm

side top exhaust:max cube fan that came with the case 120mm

My other ultra kaze broke (because im stupid)

I am currently using a program called speed fan to adjust my fan speed by percentage I have the cpu fan on 100 percent and the other fans at 40 percent (like 2000 rpms @40 percent)

except my gpu fans which I set in the video card program to always run at 100 percent

yesterday I ran wow at ultra settings and played it for two hours and my cpu only got to 50 degrees celcius and one of my gpus got up to 90 degrees celcius instead of the usuall 94 degrees celcius in 15 min

Should i have the top side fan as an exhaust?

Should I get a stronger intake fan? because itthe back exhaust is 3000rpm and idk what the front one is but it doesent feel like a lot of air is blowing but please your sugestions are needed

I will definetly post another pic when I get home.
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September 21, 2012 1:26:56 PM

RonKinNJ said:
darkshak

I purchased a similar PowerSpec PC from Micro Center a few weeks ago, the G181, with an Intel DZ68DB mainboard, rated elsewhere on Tom's . The case appears to be the same as yours, not the internals.

I had some trouble with overheating after I replaced the original ATI HD 6670 with an Nvidia GTX 560 ti (aggressive factory overclock), and installed a new 80+ power supply.

The intake fan is on the front, and blows through the disk drives, and into the main part of the case by the SATA cable sockets. The exhaust fan is in the rear behind the CPU cooler, at the opposite end of the board. In between these fans is where the PCI-e socket is located. There is no provision for a second front fan, and nowhere to mount a second in the rear. The top is solid. The left side of the case has "flexible" mounting holes for at least two 120mm fans. By flexible, I mean that you are not limited to a single position. You can skew the fan left, right, and to a slight extent, up and down the side.

On my Intel board, the north bridge has a relatively small heat sink. This sits almost under the video card. It is known to overheat (along with other nearby important components) if a tower cooler is installed instead of a downdraft. I have not replaced the stock cooler yet, but plan to use the best possible downdraft style soon.

In testing, I found my box to be too hot. I installed an Antec 3 speed 120mm case fan (Tri-cool) on the side, blowing out. This kept my video card cooler than before, but the processor temps headed for the sky under load. Blowing in, with fan blowing down on the video card was the best compromise. I have the Antec on the middle setting. It is the loudest fan I can hear, until the 560 Ti gets loaded, and then it takes over as the noise leader.

As it stands, I need more cooling, even running my 2600K stock. The intake fan remains at the original speed, and the exhaust fan picked up 25% most likely due to the additional intake giving it a boost. If a new CPU cooler does not cure the problems, I would look to replace the intake and exhaust fans with brand name 120mm, high static pressure models, with low noise figures.

Hope this gives you some ideas.

thanks dude this did help some ,my post above is what I did after reading some of yours and everyone elses posts
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September 21, 2012 1:49:25 PM

Wow I just noticed I had two pics from after I moved some cables its still bad but...

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September 21, 2012 9:59:56 PM

Best answer selected by darkshak.
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September 21, 2012 10:00:02 PM

I got home and did a bit more cable management and tweaked with some program settings, and the temps have not gone over 85 degrees Celsius. Thanks everyone for their input. :) 
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September 21, 2012 10:17:20 PM

darkshak

Did some testing today, to help figure out if the case is too hot, or the video card cooling is too weak.

Ran OCCT GPU full screen for two minutes (hot for 2, not counting the start and end monitoring). With the case closed, the GPU got up to 92 C. With the side of the case open it "only" got up to 89 C. In both cases 3 hot minutes might have fried it. I'm not as bold as you might guess. I ran the test before using Galaxy's Xtreme Tuner, which shows the GPU temperature in the upper left corner of the screen. That's how I know when to shut it down, or keep going. For the final tests, I did not use the Tuner.

While the case was open, I also ran OCCT Linpack for 6 hot minutes, and got 81 C. on the processor. When I closed it up, I got 84 C. The temps did not appear to be rising; the graphs showed them to be stable. I had run this test before, for a lot longer, and had no problems other than I did not like continuous temps in the 80's. There is zero room to overclock.

Sounds like I have a 3 C. differential open vs. closed. I say I need a better cooler on both the processor and the video card.

I also found that the 120 mm Tri-Cool on the side is noisy, and blows little air. It is blowing in, pulling through a Silverstone black filter and the holes in the side of the case. All that restriction increases the noise, and decreases the amount of air moving. I can feel it with my hand, and it isn't much. Going full speed just makes it noisy to the point I can't live with it, so it is going to stay at low speed. I plan to get a good intake fan, with good pressure stats, and try removing the side fan altogether. Not liking the price, but liking the stats, here is the name from one place that sells it:

Gelid Solutions Wing 12 PL 120mm x 25mm UV Reactive PWM Gamer Fan - UV Blue

I could save a few bucks if I wasn't a sucker for those LED's.

I can understand getting an aftermarket cooler for the processor, because I did buy a pre-built system at a low price point. I was not in the mood to get components to play nice together this time around, I just wanted a system that worked. The G181 does work as constructed. I just need a bit more. My replacement video card, however, is a joke. Shame on Galaxy for factory overclocking a GTX 560 Ti on a single fan; it doesn't cut it.

darkshak, I feel your pain. I can only play Crysis2 for 1/2 hour before reaching 90 C.
and then I have to quit. Take off the side of your case and see if the side fan is really blowing on the cards. Mine is not doing as much as I thought. I suppose that with a Dremel, I could open up some of the restrictions on the side, and the damage would never be seen because the Silverstone filter covers it. However, I want to try the video cooler first. I suppose the excess heat will be dumped inside the case, and hopefully a two fan PWM setup (NOT the Maxcubes) will be enough to get rid of it.
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September 22, 2012 7:33:51 AM

Thank you for B.a. man, I can help you with the cables if you wish,
blue wings are great fans, I run nine in my rig and would have more but they are around £15 here,unless you see a fourpack, they tend to be good value, I bought two at £32 packs each and the single was £15 so well worth keeping an eye out for
general fan alignment is,
front,base,side> intake
rear and top> exhaust
:) 
Moto
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September 24, 2012 11:57:05 AM

RonKinNJ said:
darkshak

Did some testing today, to help figure out if the case is too hot, or the video card cooling is too weak.

Ran OCCT GPU full screen for two minutes (hot for 2, not counting the start and end monitoring). With the case closed, the GPU got up to 92 C. With the side of the case open it "only" got up to 89 C. In both cases 3 hot minutes might have fried it. I'm not as bold as you might guess. I ran the test before using Galaxy's Xtreme Tuner, which shows the GPU temperature in the upper left corner of the screen. That's how I know when to shut it down, or keep going. For the final tests, I did not use the Tuner.

While the case was open, I also ran OCCT Linpack for 6 hot minutes, and got 81 C. on the processor. When I closed it up, I got 84 C. The temps did not appear to be rising; the graphs showed them to be stable. I had run this test before, for a lot longer, and had no problems other than I did not like continuous temps in the 80's. There is zero room to overclock.

Sounds like I have a 3 C. differential open vs. closed. I say I need a better cooler on both the processor and the video card.

I also found that the 120 mm Tri-Cool on the side is noisy, and blows little air. It is blowing in, pulling through a Silverstone black filter and the holes in the side of the case. All that restriction increases the noise, and decreases the amount of air moving. I can feel it with my hand, and it isn't much. Going full speed just makes it noisy to the point I can't live with it, so it is going to stay at low speed. I plan to get a good intake fan, with good pressure stats, and try removing the side fan altogether. Not liking the price, but liking the stats, here is the name from one place that sells it:

Gelid Solutions Wing 12 PL 120mm x 25mm UV Reactive PWM Gamer Fan - UV Blue

I could save a few bucks if I wasn't a sucker for those LED's.

I can understand getting an aftermarket cooler for the processor, because I did buy a pre-built system at a low price point. I was not in the mood to get components to play nice together this time around, I just wanted a system that worked. The G181 does work as constructed. I just need a bit more. My replacement video card, however, is a joke. Shame on Galaxy for factory overclocking a GTX 560 Ti on a single fan; it doesn't cut it.

darkshak, I feel your pain. I can only play Crysis2 for 1/2 hour before reaching 90 C.
and then I have to quit. Take off the side of your case and see if the side fan is really blowing on the cards. Mine is not doing as much as I thought. I suppose that with a Dremel, I could open up some of the restrictions on the side, and the damage would never be seen because the Silverstone filter covers it. However, I want to try the video cooler first. I suppose the excess heat will be dumped inside the case, and hopefully a two fan PWM setup (NOT the Maxcubes) will be enough to get rid of it.



That last paragraph, bro I hated when that happened I really just wanted to play my visually apealing games and it would get to a high temp fast. Now it is all good though. I played wow for 3 hours yesterday on ultra settings and the temp only got up to 82 degrees in a dungeon,and I bought arma 2 op and started to play dayz. So I think I'm good now, I just had to do a lot more cable management, to make sure my intake fans air was getting through to my other components. Thanks for your info btw :) 
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September 24, 2012 12:02:28 PM

Motopsychojdn said:
Thank you for B.a. man, I can help you with the cables if you wish,
blue wings are great fans, I run nine in my rig and would have more but they are around £15 here,unless you see a fourpack, they tend to be good value, I bought two at £32 packs each and the single was £15 so well worth keeping an eye out for
general fan alignment is,
front,base,side> intake
rear and top> exhaust
:) 
Moto


No problem bro, and I think I got the cable management under control for now but anytime I need help I'll be sure to ask you for your assistance. I just applied for some jobs so when I land one I'm going to get a closed water cooling kit for my cpu, and 3 matching fans(like the same brand and model,so the movement of air is equalized, I dont want one fan to be extra strong and move air the wrong way.) So I'll take a look at the ones you have posted and some others.
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September 24, 2012 3:17:08 PM

Theres a fan roundup sticky at the top of cpu components section if it helps
and I'd advise more intakes than exhaust fans, positive pressure keeps the case free from dust more than balanced or negative pressure
Moto
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September 24, 2012 3:51:49 PM

RonKinNJ said:
Shame on Galaxy for factory overclocking a GTX 560 Ti on a single fan; it doesn't cut it.




I have Diamond card with AMD chip, same story. Reference cooler, highest factory overclock for this model. Hands down the noisiest card I have ever had. :??: 
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