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CPU hardware/software

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January 28, 2013 4:19:08 PM

Hello,

I have an interesting question.
Supposed I had a PC with an Intel i5 CPU on it`s motherboard and I would like to have an i7 on it.
So I would buy the i7, remove the i5, and put the i7 on the motherboard.
My question: Do I have to change anything in Software, when I change a hardware-component, especially at CPUs?
And what is about, when I remove a graphic card and put an other in it, do I have to change anything in Software ?

Please reply, thank you.

jerryshardware

More about : cpu hardware software

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January 28, 2013 4:28:34 PM

jerryshardware said:
Hello,

I have an interesting question.
Supposed I had a PC with an Intel i5 CPU on it`s motherboard and I would like to have an i7 on it.
So I would buy the i7, remove the i5, and put the i7 on the motherboard.
My question: Do I have to change anything in Software, when I change a hardware-component, especially at CPUs?
And what is about, when I remove a graphic card and put an other in it, do I have to change anything in Software ?

Please reply, thank you.

jerryshardware


It depends.

For the CPU the most important thing to check is that your motherboard can accept the new CPU and TDP. In most self built computer this isn't a problem as most will accept all the lastest socket 1155 Sandy Bridges and Ivy Bridges CPU's. Even if it doesn't right out of the box it can usually be fixed with a quick BIOS flash. OEM computers though can be very weird and usually has a very small CPU support list. OEM's don't want people messing with their computer so they only allow for a few options on upgrades. Is this a home built or big box OEM comptuer from Dell, HP, Lenovo?

As for the video card again it will depend. If you are staying within the same brand, that is going from one AMD card to another AMD card you usually don't have to change anything. If you are switching brands though, that is going from an AMD video card to Nvidia you will have to delete all the drivers and control panel then install the drivers for the new card.
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January 28, 2013 4:30:09 PM

cpu swaps do not affect any software. Cpu drivers are generic and very basic to any OS. therefore you do not have to make any changes any where. Any software that can utilize hyper threading will do so as soon as it is available.

a gpu is more specialized hardware and jumping from nvidia to AMD will require you to install amd gpu drivers which will sometimes again be specific to gpu family within AMD offerings.
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January 29, 2013 4:12:45 PM

rds1220 said:
It depends.

For the CPU the most important thing to check is that your motherboard can accept the new CPU and TDP. In most self built computer this isn't a problem as most will accept all the lastest socket 1155 Sandy Bridges and Ivy Bridges CPU's. Even if it doesn't right out of the box it can usually be fixed with a quick BIOS flash. OEM computers though can be very weird and usually has a very small CPU support list. OEM's don't want people messing with their computer so they only allow for a few options on upgrades. Is this a home built or big box OEM comptuer from Dell, HP, Lenovo?

As for the video card again it will depend. If you are staying within the same brand, that is going from one AMD card to another AMD card you usually don't have to change anything. If you are switching brands though, that is going from an AMD video card to Nvidia you will have to delete all the drivers and control panel then install the drivers for the new card.


Hello,

Thank you very, very much for your answer. I wish more would answer in a way like you did, friendly and helping.
So, I have not the computer yet, but it will be self built.
I only will stay at NVIDIA graphics cards.
I have often read "OEM", what is it?
What is TDP?
So what do you recommend me now, with the help of the information I gave you.

with very kind regards,
jerryshardware
a c 79 à CPUs
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January 29, 2013 5:07:03 PM

OEM's are Original Equipment Manufacturers. It has two meanings.
Meaning 1. Intel is an example of an OEM. It is the original manufacturer of pentium line of cpu's. However it does not build complete systems like you HP or Alienware. It supplies its products to these companies and then they assemble products sourced from various retailers and provides a final branded desktop/notebook etc.

Meaning 2. In its second meaning,which RDS implied in the above post, a complete solution provider can also be called an OEM like Alinware itself. it is because area-51 is an original alienware product/brand of pc's. they alone have the rights to it and manufacture it or resource it's components. They can be termed second tier OEM's to make the understanding easier.

Now sometimes you'll hear something like an OEM corsair psu. What that mans is that particular psu is supplied by Corsair to Second tier OEM's. It is not available to general public as branded corsair psu. It has all got to do with bulk supplies to second tier OEM's and are often controlled and manufactured under guidelines that are specific to who is buying them. So Alienware may ask Corsair to supply them with psu's, guidelines for which are defined in part by alienware.

too long i know but might clarify some doubts

-satyam
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January 29, 2013 5:27:16 PM

TDP :)  stands for thermal design power. It is the maximum power that the cpu can reach before critically heating up and is therefore the maximum power that the cpu cooling system is required to dissipate.

TDP is a good indictor of efficiency. take this example. Imagine two cpu's which are both made form the same quality of silicon. This would mean that they both have the same critical maximum core temperature exceeding which they will crash. lets assume that it is 90C.
now suppose one of them has a TDP of 95 Watts (call it A) while the other had a TDP of 100 Watts (call it B). What this means is that running at 90C (limit of temperature)
A will only be dissipating 95 Watts while B will be dissipating 5 more watts to stay within its TDP, this extra 5 watts is being pulled into the system by your psu.

in other words, B will be consuming 5 extra watts of power to stay as cool as A.

a c 152 à CPUs
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January 29, 2013 8:58:07 PM

jerryshardware said:
Hello,

Thank you very, very much for your answer. I wish more would answer in a way like you did, friendly and helping.
So, I have not the computer yet, but it will be self built.
I only will stay at NVIDIA graphics cards.
I have often read "OEM", what is it?
What is TDP?
So what do you recommend me now, with the help of the information I gave you.

with very kind regards,
jerryshardware


In that case there shouldn't be a problem you can easily switch from a Sandy Bridges or Ivy Bridges I5 to a SB/IB I5 or I7.

If you are are staying in the same brand (Nvidia) than you can upgrade pretty easily. If you get a GTX 650Ti now then decide later you want a GTX 670 all you have to do is pull out the old card and replace it with the new one. You shouldn't have to do anything with the drivers unless you have some sort of problem.
January 30, 2013 7:28:09 PM

Thank you very much guys for helping me.
!