Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Cosair 750W modular psu

Last response: in Components
Share
January 29, 2013 12:16:47 PM

Hello,
Is this a modular psu? The advertisement says yes, the pictures don't show this to be modular. Help!

Best solution

a c 76 ) Power supply
January 29, 2013 12:20:13 PM
Share

If it is a Corsair HX750, or an AX750, it is modular. (The TX models are not modular).

The difference is as follows:

HX750 - Modular except for the 24-pins connector

AX750 - Fully modular including the 24-pins connector
January 29, 2013 12:22:53 PM

Thanks so much. I'm considering upgrading my psu and I want to do it myself. I'm skeptical that I could do it other than modular. Do think size would be a problem?
Related resources
a c 76 ) Power supply
January 29, 2013 12:30:47 PM

By size do you mean physical dimensions or power output?

These PSUs are usually ATX PSUs and are interchangeable.

Replacing a PSU is pretty straight forward, but please remember to wear a 'Grounding Strap' (for static electricity safety) when you are working on the inside of computers.
January 29, 2013 12:37:50 PM

Ubrales said:
If it is a Corsair HX750, or an AX750, it is modular. (The TX models are not modular).

The difference is as follows:

HX750 - Modular except for the 24-pins connector

AX750 - Fully modular including the 24-pins connector

Which is weird, because how often are you not going to need the 24-pin connector?
a c 76 ) Power supply
January 29, 2013 12:43:02 PM

MatildaPersson said:
Which is weird, because how often are you not going to need the 24-pin connector?

Yes I thought about that. Corsair's logic is that the PSU can be replaced without disconnecting the 24-pins connector from the motherboard. Even this is a rare incident.
January 29, 2013 12:50:02 PM

Ubrales said:
Yes I thought about that. Corsair's logic is that the PSU can be replaced without disconnecting the 24-pins connector from the motherboard. Even this is a rare incident.

Wow. That's a really specific situation lol.

Oh, you know what - modular cables are easier to braid, right? I bet that plays into it. I know I like the look of my braided cables and wouldn't want any standing out as different.
a c 124 ) Power supply
January 29, 2013 12:50:56 PM

S Ray said:
Thanks so much. I'm considering upgrading my psu and I want to do it myself. I'm skeptical that I could do it other than modular. Do think size would be a problem?


Modular will have no effect on your ability to build your system. There are various different types of modular.

Full Modular - Every cable is modular. While this may appear attractive at first glance it is actually "not as good as the hybrid category. Each connector adds cost, increases resistance, adds a potential failure point and decreases efficiency. Upside is you never have to have a cable in your box that isn't needed.

Non-modular - every cable is hard wired which means highest efficiencies and lower resistance (all other things being equal and, usually, they are not). Downside is ya have extra cable in ya box that ya don't need.

Hybrid Modular - The best of both worlds. Cables which are absolutely essential are hard wired and cables which are optional are modular. This can range from just the 24 pin power cable to the 24 pin, the 8 pin EPS, one SATA, one PCI-E. This is actually an advantage over full modular as each connector introduces a failure point, increases resistance, decreases efficiency and needlessly increase cost. While many will argue that these differences are very small, you are actually paying more money to get a completely useless feature which has slight electrical disadvantage. You can not build a system without the 24 pin cable connected so there's no possible gain from having this cable as modular. When ya done building, you will have no extra cables in ya box giving you every advantage of fully modular w/o any of the downsides.....however small they might be. And sleeving is not an issue as ya only need one end free in order to sleeve a cable.

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/power-supplies-psu,801...
a c 76 ) Power supply
January 29, 2013 1:04:12 PM

MatildaPersson said:
Wow. That's a really specific situation lol.

Oh, you know what - modular cables are easier to braid, right? I bet that plays into it. I know I like the look of my braided cables and wouldn't want any standing out as different.

These modular cables that come with the HX as well as the AX series are flat ribbon type cables. Braiding will work, but will look a little different. Fortunately the 24-pins cable comes braided; I am referring to the other cables.

To get the sleeve over the 8-pins connector is tricky without removing the connector pins which I do not recommend.

These flat cables are what I have on my AX850 (i7 3770K) 3 weeks old - fully modular and works perfectly! No plans to sleeve even though I agree that it will look better.
January 29, 2013 1:05:05 PM

Ubrales said:
These modular cables that come with the HX as well as the AX series are flat ribbon type cables. Braiding will work, but will look a little different. Fortunately the 24-pins cable comes braided; I am referring to the other cables.

To get the sleeve over the 8-pins connector is tricky without removing the connector pins which I do not recommend.

These flat cables are what I have on my AX850 (i7 3770K) 3 weeks old - fully modular and works perfectly! No plans to sleeve even though I agree that it will look better.

I guess I'm too shallow lol
a c 76 ) Power supply
January 29, 2013 1:14:49 PM

MatildaPersson said:
I guess I'm too shallow lol

No. These people change products too fast!

Corsair's AX850 which has absolutely no markings for the ports is already replaced by the AX860 (or AX860i) on which the ports are silk screened white.

I had a hard time trying to figure out how the 24-pins connector plugged in. The motherboard end had 24 pins but the PSU end had two separate connectors; one 18-pins and one 10-pins, and plugged into two separate ports (on two different rows) on the PSU. And needless to say, the manual said nothing about this. I got the necessary information from another tech site.

The AX850 is OEM by Seasonic; whereas the AX860 is OEM by Flextronics - the cables are not interchangeable!
January 29, 2013 1:22:46 PM

Ubrales said:
No. These people change products too fast!

Corsair's AX850 which has absolutely no markings for the ports is already replaced by the AX860 (or AX860i) on which the ports are silk screened white.

I had a hard time trying to figure out how the 24-pins connector plugged in. The motherboard end had 24 pins but the PSU end had two separate connectors; one 18-pins and one 10-pins, and plugged into two separate ports (on two different rows) on the PSU. And needless to say, the manual said nothing about this. I got the necessary information from another tech site.

The AX850 is OEM by Seasonic; whereas the AX860 is OEM by Flextronics - the cables are not interchangeable!

I don't know the specifics, but I remember reading that Corsair were unhappy with their PSU range and the recent changes have been due to this change.
a c 76 ) Power supply
January 29, 2013 1:42:22 PM

MatildaPersson said:
I don't know the specifics, but I remember reading that Corsair were unhappy with their PSU range and the recent changes have been due to this change.

That explains it.
January 30, 2013 8:34:02 AM

Best answer selected by S Ray.
January 30, 2013 8:48:39 AM

JackNaylorPE said:
Modular will have no effect on your ability to build your system. There are various different types of modular.

Full Modular - Every cable is modular. While this may appear attractive at first glance it is actually "not as good as the hybrid category. Each connector adds cost, increases resistance, adds a potential failure point and decreases efficiency. Upside is you never have to have a cable in your box that isn't needed.

Non-modular - every cable is hard wired which means highest efficiencies and lower resistance (all other things being equal and, usually, they are not). Downside is ya have extra cable in ya box that ya don't need.

Hybrid Modular - The best of both worlds. Cables which are absolutely essential are hard wired and cables which are optional are modular. This can range from just the 24 pin power cable to the 24 pin, the 8 pin EPS, one SATA, one PCI-E. This is actually an advantage over full modular as each connector introduces a failure point, increases resistance, decreases efficiency and needlessly increase cost. While many will argue that these differences are very small, you are actually paying more money to get a completely useless feature which has slight electrical disadvantage. You can not build a system without the 24 pin cable connected so there's no possible gain from having this cable as modular. When ya done building, you will have no extra cables in ya box giving you every advantage of fully modular w/o any of the downsides.....however small they might be. And sleeving is not an issue as ya only need one end free in order to sleeve a cable.

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/power-supplies-psu,801...



Does the EPS cable plug to the motherboard? I had read that ATX and EPS do not mix. Forgive my ignorance. I am about to change psu and am very leary. I may chicken out and take it to a tech shop. At least I'll remove the old one.
a c 76 ) Power supply
January 30, 2013 11:21:31 AM

If you are going with the Corsair HX750 there is an 8-pins connector cable marked "CPU only" - connect this cable to the motherboard CPU 8-pins connector. Some of the older motherboards have a 4-pins connector for CPU power. If this is the case, look at the 8-pins cable and you will notice that it can be separated into two 4-pins connectors. Use any one of these 4-pins connectors and leave the other 4-pins half hang aside.

Watch some YouTube videos about changing a PSU and you will get the idea. The process may seem intimidating to some but it is really not so difficult to do.

Per Corsair, cables are not interchangeable from model to model (because the OEMs are different).

When you connect the 24-pins connector keep in mind that you are engaging 24 pins and this takes some force after you locate the connector into the socket. And make sure that the latch is engaged.

Good luck!
!