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Replacing power supply in Pavillion p6540y desktop

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September 16, 2012 12:54:04 AM

Read a cnet review that the Pavillion taxes the capability of the legacy 250w ps. I also have a case fan that doesn't always start/replaced fan/ still have to restart once in awhile. Thought I might replace the ps and plug another fan into the ps with an adapter rather than the motherboard. The HP info says its an ATX with 24 pin and 4 pin conn. What other specs or info do I need to get a ps that will fit and supply proper specified voltages. Thanks for any help.
September 16, 2012 3:57:18 AM

btrain26 said:
Read a cnet review that the Pavillion taxes the capability of the legacy 250w ps. I also have a case fan that doesn't always start/replaced fan/ still have to restart once in awhile. Thought I might replace the ps and plug another fan into the ps with an adapter rather than the motherboard. The HP info says its an ATX with 24 pin and 4 pin conn. What other specs or info do I need to get a ps that will fit and supply proper specified voltages. Thanks for any help.


http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

You can use this psu for a hp computer and 350w should then be able to supply adequate power to your computer.
a b ) Power supply
September 17, 2012 2:45:39 AM

IF you are not changing your HPs config then a new power supply should have no value to you. HP specs decent power supplies to avoid returns. So do all the other major vendors.

Can you give a pointer to "Read a cnet review that the Pavillion taxes the capability of the legacy 250w ps. " This is not something i've seen before. A review site like CNET saying an major vendor like HP specs the wrong size PSU.

Re case fan, is it plugged in? Are you current on BIOS? If so then replace the fan. Checking with a 'HTPC' or 'Quiet PC' website will get you suggestions on a quality replacement that is quiet, long life an moves air. Fans are really cheap.
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September 18, 2012 5:11:48 PM

tsnor said:
IF you are not changing your HPs config then a new power supply should have no value to you. HP specs decent power supplies to avoid returns. So do all the other major vendors.

Can you give a pointer to "Read a cnet review that the Pavillion taxes the capability of the legacy 250w ps. " This is not something i've seen before. A review site like CNET saying an major vendor like HP specs the wrong size PSU.

Re case fan, is it plugged in? Are you current on BIOS? If so then replace the fan. Checking with a 'HTPC' or 'Quiet PC' website will get you suggestions on a quality replacement that is quiet, long life an moves air. Fans are really cheap.


http://reviews.cnet.com/desktops/hp-pavilion-p6540y/450...
This is the review I referred to. As for configuration; I don't have any immediate plans since I found out that the systems onboard graphics can support two monitors. I recently helped my son build a gaming computer and was intrigued with the two monitors. I don't game but it would be great for investment site where I compare graphs and such.
In regard to the fan. Yes, it is plugged into the motherboard. I replaced it with a name brand fan and it stops like the original from time to time and I get a error message.
Don't know why a configuration (BIOS) would affect an intermittent problem. It may seem a stupid question but I looked at fans and all I saw were 80 and 120mm. I remember that this was an odd size....kept looking and see that there are 92mm case fans. I will check the sites you suggested if I decide to replace the fan again.

It may be unnecessary but I ordered a Corsair CX V2 430W 80 plus psu. I can always salvage it for future use or I may opt to add a video card. Let's just say I got interested when I helped build a system....my background is electronics but not a lot of software training.

Thank you for your input.

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a b ) Power supply
September 19, 2012 11:42:00 PM
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Thanks for the ref. I think the comment in the article really was meant to be "250W limits the upgradability of the system" rather than 250W wasn't enough to run what they shipped with headroom.

re updating the PSU... GO FOR IT. But it's addictive. Now that you have a large PSU a big video card you can use to run community grid or some other application is just a few clicks away.... and external DAC makes music sound better especially plumbed through a nice headphone amp and new cans. (My father-in-laws reason for upgrading to a GTX 660ti "Better OSx Support" than the GTX550 he replaced)

re Fan replace. This may help, its from wikipedia... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_fan

"
The type of bearing used in a fan can affect its performance and noise. Most computer fans use one of the following bearing types:

Sleeve bearings use two surfaces lubricated with oil or grease as a friction contact. They often use porous sintered sleeves to be self-lubricating, requiring only infrequent maintenance or replacement. Sleeve bearings are less durable at higher temperatures as the contact surfaces wear and the lubricant dries up, eventually leading to failure; however, lifetime is similar at relatively low ambient temperatures.[4] Sleeve bearings may be more likely to fail at higher temperatures, and may perform poorly when mounted in any orientation other than vertical. The lifespan of a sleeve-bearing fan may be around 40,000 hours at 50 °C. Fans that use sleeve bearings are generally cheaper than fans that use ball bearings, and are quieter at lower speeds early in their life, but can become noisy as they age.[4]
Rifle bearings are similar to sleeve bearings, but are quieter and have almost as much lifespan as ball bearings. The bearing has a spiral groove in it that pumps fluid from a reservoir. This allows them to be safely mounted with the shaft vertical (unlike sleeve bearings), since the fluid being pumped lubricates the top of the shaft.[5] The pumping also ensures sufficient lubricant on the shaft, reducing noise, and increasing lifespan.
Ball bearings: Though generally more expensive, ball bearing fans do not suffer the same orientation limitations as sleeve bearing fans, are more durable at higher temperatures, and are quieter than sleeve-bearing fans at higher rotation speeds. The lifespan of a ball bearing fan may be over 60,000 hours at 50 °C.[4]
September 20, 2012 3:09:17 PM

Best answer selected by btrain26.
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