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Intel Turbo-boost Force to Max

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January 30, 2013 2:07:47 AM

Dear Community,

My notebook, the hp 4-1030us, uses Intel's 3rd generation Core i5 and it's HD 4000 graphics chip. It also uses Intel Turbo Boost to actively and automatically increase or decrease the speed of both the CPU and the GPU. For example, during games and start-up, Turbo Boost actively clocks the CPU between 1.7 and 2.6 ghz, and the GPU between 350 and 1050 mhz. It also actively disables and enables the CPUs second core as it's being used. Is there any way to force the CPU and GPU to remain at 2.6ghz and 1050mhz, respectively, (and permanently enable the second core) at all times?

Thanks,
Andrew

P.S. My computer has a locked BIOS, preventing Intel's XTU from actually doing anything except stress tests and active monitoring (so I can't use that to increase the minimum values). Is there a program that can work around this, or a reliable BIOS hack I can install (if necessary)?

Regards,
AJwork
a c 79 à CPUs
a b å Intel
January 30, 2013 3:28:46 AM

no it is not possible and for a good reason. Turbo boost engages in short bursts because while it is active, it violates your processor's TDP.

for instance a 95 W TDP sandy bridge cpu will attain 118 Watts while turbo boosting. You can however increase the time for which turbo can remain active. by default it is 1 second but it can be raised in increments of .25 i think but do not remember the upper limit think its in vicinity of 2 seconds.

these settings can be located in BIOS (processor over rides) but ideally you should not do this atleast with a stock cooler.

good luck
-satyam

one important piece of info i forgot, readers who have z68, z77 mobo's with overclocking capabilities may have advanced options. This answer is more in accordance with h61/h67 non OC'ing mobo's
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January 30, 2013 5:51:49 AM

satyamdubey said:
no it is not possible and for a good reason. Turbo boost engages in short bursts because while it is active, it violates your processor's TDP.

for instance a 95 W TDP sandy bridge cpu will attain 118 Watts while turbo boosting. You can however increase the time for which turbo can remain active. by default it is 1 second but it can be raised in increments of .25 i think but do not remember the upper limit think its in vicinity of 2 seconds.

these settings can be located in BIOS (processor over rides) but ideally you should not do this atleast with a stock cooler.

good luck
-satyam

one important piece of info i forgot, readers who have z68, z77 mobo's with overclocking capabilities may have advanced options. This answer is more in accordance with h61/h67 non OC'ing mobo's



You know that I'm using a laptop, right?

While the CPU's "limit" is supposed to be 17 watts, I know that my notebook's socket has a TDP of 35 watts. I also have a decent laptop cooler for it, so heat's not a big issue either.

I've also looked at my BIOS, and it doesn't give me any options to set voltages, clocks, etc.

HP claims that those settings were taken away from the general populace to prevent people from damaging their notebooks, but I think it's just a question of obsolescence paid upgrades.

Right now, it looks like my best bet is to hack my bios. Anyone have any tips on that?
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February 2, 2013 4:23:44 AM

bump
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a c 79 à CPUs
a b å Intel
February 2, 2013 4:54:10 AM

you may be able to hack the BIOS but any tinkering at that level or even hacking the BIOS will probably void your warranty. I am not sure but it probably will.

Moreover, even hacked, your BIOS chipset might not allow setting your multi above the standard max value. you can check if you can enter BIOS and disable speed step and turbo and disable all C-states except C0 (enable that alone)
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