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So maybe we didn't kill our PSU?

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  • Power Supplies
  • Components
Last response: in Components
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January 30, 2013 2:31:57 PM

Long post, sorry.....

So we recently built the following ultra-low budget system for my son to use when at his mother's:

CPU - AMD A10-5800K Trinity 3.8GHz (4.2GHz Turbo) Socket FM2 100W Quad-Core Desktop APU (CPU + GPU)
MOBO - ASRock FM2A75M-DGS FM2 AMD A75 (Hudson D3) SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX AMD Motherboard
RAM - G.SKILL Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866 (PC3 14900) Desktop Memory Model F3-1866C9D-8GAB
HDD - Western Digital WD Blue WD5000AAKX 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
CD/DVD - LG CD/DVD Burner Black SATA Model GH24NS72 - OEM
PSU - CORSAIR Builder Series CX430 430W ATX12V v2.3 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply
CASE - COOLER MASTER Elite 431 Plus RC-431P-KWN2 Black Steel Body (0.5mm SECC), ABS plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
OS - Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit - OEM

During the build the end of one of the psu's sata cables was snapped (don't ask) so we switched to another and forgot about it. Of course when we turned on the psu the led's on the case fans started flashing because, I presume, the exposed cable was grounded against the case. We immediately disconnected the power and covered the damaged cable with electricians tape, re-assembled and (with fingers crossed and hearts in throats) turned the psu back on. Everything seemed to be in order, all components worked and os and drivers installed as they should. I remained suspicious, however, of our error and the ability of the marginally good psu to survive such abuse, so I told my son to tell me of any strange behavior once he started using the machine.

Now, since the machine is at his mother's I can only rely on his reports (he is a typical 15-year old so...) and right away there were sleep/hibernate issues. I know there could be several problem/solutions for these (including faulty psu) so I told him to change the settings to always on and shut down each night and report back.

He next reported that he had to turn the psu off and back on to power up in the morning, and after that everything worked perfectly. This had me convinced that we had mortally wounded our PSU and I put a replacement unit in my wishlist and started saving money (yes things are that tight).

Now he says that one morning Windows installed 1,600 updates (15-year old exaggeration?) and since then it has started up perfectly without touching the psu. It has now worked without any problems for three weeks (still no hibernate and shutting down each night).

So now I wonder, should I hold off on replacing the psu, or should I still put in a new seasonic asap?

Thanks.

More about : kill psu

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January 30, 2013 2:54:18 PM

Sounds like it's working now. I'd wait until it fails again....
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January 30, 2013 3:25:07 PM

No point spending any money if its working now.
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January 30, 2013 3:52:58 PM

Quote:
Sounds like it's working now. I'd wait until it fails again....

Quote:
No point spending any money if its working now.


Thanks guys, that's what I was thinking. I just hate problems that go away on their own - they seem to come back on their own too.....
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January 30, 2013 5:06:23 PM

Best answer selected by edtheguy.
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