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registered sdram?

Last response: in Memory
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September 30, 2001 5:38:48 PM

I was going to upgrade my system ... but now I am thinking of working with current motherboard for a bit longer.

I have a p2xbl rev d board with an intel 440bx/ 2x rev. 3 chipset

Manual says the board will take up to 768 of pc 100 sdram. I have 512 of pc 133 in there (since it's backwards compatible and I "got a deal" -- and, DUH, didn't realize it only needed pc 100 at the time) ... it's crucial memory, btw.

anyway, I am using win 98se -- and considering upgrade to win 2000 AND putting another stick of 256 ram in there.

QUESTION:

Do I need registered memory to use 3 dimm slots? If yes, do I need ALL 3 chips too be registered, or can I use the 2 I have and add a 3rd that is registered?

I updated my bios earlier this year (used esupport.com - very easy and helpful). I did it so I could use a larger (30 gig) HD ... I'm not even sure what other differences the bios upgrade made! ... ahem ... "dumb "blond here!! <g> ... guess I'll go do some researching and see!

thanks for the help,

deb

More about : registered sdram

a b } Memory
October 1, 2001 5:31:41 AM

You can probably use more than the recommended maximum if you wish, I think the BX actually supports 1GB of memory and very few BIOS's cannot deal with it. Make sure you have the latest BIOS.
You do not need ANY registered modules for your system to work. But if you plan on enabling ECC, you will need ALL registered modules. ECC will make your computer run slower if it's enabled.

Back to you Tom...
October 1, 2001 12:25:51 PM

thanks again ... that's good info!

ECC?? What's that?? If it would make my system run slower, WHY would I want to enable it??

deb
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a b } Memory
October 1, 2001 2:18:00 PM

Be careful with 98. I have been reading some other things around here, and have noted people saying 98 has problems with > 512MB
a b } Memory
October 1, 2001 4:11:19 PM

Error correction, for data integrety errors in RAM. I guess it's important to people making huge calculations in theoretical physics or something.

Back to you Tom...
!