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What wattage do I need for this setup?

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February 2, 2013 11:01:17 PM

Hey everyone,
This is my first time building a gaming rig and I'm excited. I have everything planned out, except the most important part: the power supply. How much wattage do I need for this setup?

Intel i7 3770K Ivy Bridge
EVGA Superclocked+ nVidia GeForce GTX 660 Ti 3GB
G.SKILL Ripjaw X Series 16GB
Seagate 2TB HDD
Asus DRW-24B1ST Disk Reader/Burner
Windows 7 Professional 64-Bit
Intel BOXDZ77GA70K LGA 1155 Motherboard

More about : wattage setup

a c 288 ) Power supply
February 2, 2013 11:26:07 PM

MORATORiAS said:
Hey everyone,
This is my first time building a gaming rig and I'm excited. I have everything planned out, except the most important part: the power supply. How much wattage do I need for this setup?

Intel i7 3770K Ivy Bridge
EVGA Superclocked+ nVidia GeForce GTX 660 Ti 3GB
G.SKILL Ripjaw X Series 16GB
Seagate 2TB HDD
Asus DRW-24B1ST Disk Reader/Burner
Windows 7 Professional 64-Bit
Intel BOXDZ77GA70K LGA 1155 Motherboard


Hi - you can run that on a quality 450w PSU (24a on the +12v rail),
because of the superclock, I'd say go with a quality 450-500w
unit. No harm in more power, except to your wallet.

Stay with quality brands:
Seasonic, XFX, Antec, PC Power & Cooling, Rosewill Capstone series,
most Corsairs & a few others.

if you have a budget, I'll be happy to suggest some units.

Tom
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a b ) Power supply
February 2, 2013 11:30:33 PM

and if its for gaming you only need a 3570k

and 8gb of ram
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a c 243 ) Power supply
February 2, 2013 11:37:55 PM

toyftw said:
a quality 450w PSU (24a on the +12v rail)

If you come across a 450w with only 24a on the 12v, keep going
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February 2, 2013 11:45:23 PM

toyftw said:
Hi - you can run that on a quality 450w PSU (24a on the +12v rail),
because of the superclock, I'd say go with a quality 450-500w
unit. No harm in more power, except to your wallet.

Stay with quality brands:
Seasonic, XFX, Antec, PC Power & Cooling, Rosewill Capstone series,
most Corsairs & a few others.

if you have a budget, I'll be happy to suggest some units.

Tom


Well, if 500w is good, then what PSU would be good? I'm mainly focusing on Corsair, but if there are better ones, then by all means I'm all ears.
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a c 288 ) Power supply
February 2, 2013 11:46:00 PM

delluser1 said:
If you come across a 450w with only 24a on the 12v, keep going


was letting him know he needed 24a on the +12vrail(s), suppose I should have added at least 24a
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a c 288 ) Power supply
February 2, 2013 11:54:46 PM

MORATORiAS said:
Alright, so with this, I finally have all the components needed to build my rig. Thanks for your help!


enjoy your rig!
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a c 243 ) Power supply
February 3, 2013 12:13:57 AM

toyftw said:
was letting him know he needed 24a on the +12vrail(s)

Yep, didn't mean anything by it
"quality 450w and 24 amps" just doesn't sound right together, old Dell 375w in the bin does 30a
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a c 288 ) Power supply
February 3, 2013 12:31:05 PM

delluser1 said:
Yep, didn't mean anything by it
"quality 450w and 24 amps" just doesn't sound right together, old Dell 375w in the bin does 30a


I know you didn't, I prob woulda made the same repy if I had read that post
from someone else.
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February 4, 2013 10:28:02 PM

toyftw said:
enjoy your rig!


Do you think I could get a higher wattage PSU without damaging my components?
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a c 288 ) Power supply
February 4, 2013 10:34:18 PM

MORATORiAS said:
Do you think I could get a higher wattage PSU without damaging my components?


Yes - psu's only pull from the wall (efficiency affected) the power that
your pc components require. I.E. if your sys is consuming 300w, then
that's all the psu will deliver regardless of it's total capability.

I did the same thing you are asking, I needed 450 - got 650.

The only harm is to your wallet

Tom
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February 4, 2013 10:35:52 PM

toyftw said:
Yes - psu's only pull from the wall (efficiency affected) the power that
your pc components require. I.E. if your sys is consuming 300w, then
that's all the psu will deliver regardless of it's total capability.

I did the same thing you are asking, I needed 450 - got 650.

The only harm is to your wallet

Tom


Ah, alright. I don't want everything running at like 90% on minimal load.
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February 4, 2013 10:39:49 PM

toyftw said:
Yes - psu's only pull from the wall (efficiency affected) the power that
your pc components require. I.E. if your sys is consuming 300w, then
that's all the psu will deliver regardless of it's total capability.

I did the same thing you are asking, I needed 450 - got 650.

The only harm is to your wallet

Tom


Would this 750w be okay? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a c 288 ) Power supply
February 4, 2013 10:47:28 PM

MORATORiAS said:
Would this 750w be okay? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Yes of course it will, more than you need, will allow you to SLI down the road if you wish,
or upgrade to any current gpu out there. It's also one of Corsair's prof (like AX) series
PSU's, so you get better grade parts, more rigid specs, and most likely tighter QC
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February 4, 2013 10:55:42 PM

toyftw said:
Yes of course it will, more than you need, will allow you to SLI down the road if you wish,
or upgrade to any current gpu out there. It's also one of Corsair's prof (like AX) series
PSU's, so you get better grade parts, more rigid specs, and most likely tighter QC


Oh, alright, awesome. Thanks!
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Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
February 5, 2013 3:54:49 AM

toyftw said:
Yes - psu's only pull from the wall (efficiency affected) the power that
your pc components require. I.E. if your sys is consuming 300w, then
that's all the psu will deliver regardless of it's total capability.

I did the same thing you are asking, I needed 450 - got 650.

The only harm is to your wallet

Tom

yes it does harm your wallet.

PSU's effciency take a nose dive when below a 20% load, up to 7%, so when the rig runs at idle, which most spend their time at, the money spent getting a 80+, bronze, silver or gold PSU is wasted as the efficiency will be below 80%. when a PSU runs inefficient it gets hot, drying out the capacitors and causing them to fail; decreasing the PSUs life expectancy.

any mularky about SLI/crossfire or future upgrading is no reason to get a PSU with wattage that is unnecessary. if there isn't a budget or money being saved now for any other graphics card for SLI/crossfire then chances are it will not happen - especially with higher range cards. and "higher quality" components do not use any more power than less "quality" components - they would actually use less.

bottom line is a PSU should fit like a glove with the idle wattage 20%+ and max load under 80% of the rated wattage.
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a c 288 ) Power supply
February 5, 2013 11:51:31 AM

MORATORiAS said:
Oh, alright, awesome. Thanks!


Hi again - From jonnyguru - article found on Toms Hardware and
whose opinion I would trust more than those posting 'mularky' on here:

Power Supply FAQs
Power Supply Basics:

Is there such a thing as "too much power"?

"Generally, no. A power supply only puts out as much power as needed by the system's components. In some cases, an 800W power supply may actually use less power from the wall than a 500W power supply, depending on the efficiency of the units. Often times, buying an "oversized" PSU is a good choice due to it's ability to perform even under higher temperatures, a quieter fan because the unit is delivering a lower percentage of it's total capability and considerable system upgradability without having to worry about having enough power when upgrading a graphics card, adding a graphics card for SLI or additional hard drives."

In other words MORATORiAS, get that power supply you linked if that's what you want,
as the only harm is to your wallet. Don't worry about anyone else's mularky

Also, that HX unit replaces (same oem & specs) the prev hx 750 which had 88.4% efficiency
at 20%(19.9%) load
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Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
February 5, 2013 1:40:11 PM

wanna trade links? oh you didn't provide a link, just a quote . . :p 
50% Load Myth
Quote:
On the 650W my peak loading condition will be at exactly 50% load. I will be getting about 82% efficiency. At idle I will be at about 15% load--call it 79% efficiency. Multitasking will be 23% load--80% efficiency. Heavy gaming will be 38% load or about 81% efficiency.

On the 400W my peak loading condition will be at about 80% load. I will be getting about 81% efficiency. At idle I will be at about 25% load--call it 80% efficiency. Multitasking will be 38% load--81% efficiency. Heavy gaming will be 63% load, or about 81% efficiency.


Let's average those figures.

650W average efficiency = 80.5% efficiency
400W average efficiency = 80.75% efficiency

Hey, a tiny difference in efficiency--in favor of the smaller PSU. How about that. Now consider that a quality 400W power supply with that kind of efficiency curve can be had for about $40, while a 650W PSU with that kind of efficiency might run $80. A $40 difference. So that's $40, plus slightly (slightly) higher electricity bill, by going with the 650W instead of the 400W.




Then you ask, "But what about upgradability?" Great point! Except that nine times out of ten some gof comes along and says, "No, you want to run your PSU at 50% load for the best efficiency!"

... Thus starting the cycle over.


so as given in that example getting a higher wattage PSU effects overall efficiency. or if you like images:
Debunking Power Supply Myths

Quote:
The first system causes this high-performance power supply to only run at 73% to 81% efficiency, depending on input voltage. Obviously, there's absolutely no need for a 900W power supply if you're running this type of computer.

The midrange system looks quite a bit better, allowing the PSU to run at 80% to 88% efficiency, although the latter only occurs at maximum load. Considering the vast majority of systems rarely run at 100% load most of the time, real-world efficiency will average closer to 82%. Office work and Internet surfing in particular will be at that level.

For the third system, a 900W power supply actually might start to make sense. It's still more than you need, but having a bit of extra room to grow isn't a bad idea. This system idles at over 300W, so it achieves a minimum 86% efficiency with 120VAC. When running a game or other demanding task, the PSU is finally able to reach its potential and provide 89% efficiency with 230VAC (or 87.5% with 120VAC).


both those examples take into consideration both idle and full load usage.

to repost a chart pertaining to the OPs actual usage:



with a single GTX 66ti SC they won't go over 100 watts idle and less than 300 watts under load. so going with a 750 watt PSU max load is 40%. not close to 50% which is the neighborhood of maximum efficiency (50%-60% depending on the PSU).

add another 660ti that runs 18 watts idle and ~150 watts under full load for a power consumption of 117/441 watts and a 750 watt PSU still doesn't make any sense unless it is going full load ~100% of the time with the idle load being under 20% of the rated wattage; which is 150 watts.

i follow jonnyguru also. you quoted a general opinion without any specifics. i believe you are using it out of context. and btw, the mularky i was referring to was:
Quote:
so you get better grade parts, more rigid specs, and most likely tighter QC


like i said before; getting better/higher quality components would be apt to not need any more power.

the build posted would run fine with a 450-500 watt PSU, a 550 with four 6 pin power connections would be able to run a 660ti SLI set up. if the OP wants to get an "oversized" PSU than a 650 watt would be fine. a 750 watt PSU is too much. a 750 watt gold rated PSU would be a waste of money when they sit there idling with ~80% efficiency.

not a good recommendation.
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a c 288 ) Power supply
February 5, 2013 2:21:09 PM

Anonymous said:
wanna trade links? oh you didn't provide a link, just a quote . . :p 
50% Load Myth
Quote:
On the 650W my peak loading condition will be at exactly 50% load. I will be getting about 82% efficiency. At idle I will be at about 15% load--call it 79% efficiency. Multitasking will be 23% load--80% efficiency. Heavy gaming will be 38% load or about 81% efficiency.

On the 400W my peak loading condition will be at about 80% load. I will be getting about 81% efficiency. At idle I will be at about 25% load--call it 80% efficiency. Multitasking will be 38% load--81% efficiency. Heavy gaming will be 63% load, or about 81% efficiency.


Let's average those figures.

650W average efficiency = 80.5% efficiency
400W average efficiency = 80.75% efficiency

Hey, a tiny difference in efficiency--in favor of the smaller PSU. How about that. Now consider that a quality 400W power supply with that kind of efficiency curve can be had for about $40, while a 650W PSU with that kind of efficiency might run $80. A $40 difference. So that's $40, plus slightly (slightly) higher electricity bill, by going with the 650W instead of the 400W.




Then you ask, "But what about upgradability?" Great point! Except that nine times out of ten some gof comes along and says, "No, you want to run your PSU at 50% load for the best efficiency!"

... Thus starting the cycle over.


so as given in that example getting a higher wattage PSU effects overall efficiency. or if you like images:
Debunking Power Supply Myths
http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/psu/2008/psu-power-myths/eff1.png
Quote:
The first system causes this high-performance power supply to only run at 73% to 81% efficiency, depending on input voltage. Obviously, there's absolutely no need for a 900W power supply if you're running this type of computer.

The midrange system looks quite a bit better, allowing the PSU to run at 80% to 88% efficiency, although the latter only occurs at maximum load. Considering the vast majority of systems rarely run at 100% load most of the time, real-world efficiency will average closer to 82%. Office work and Internet surfing in particular will be at that level.

For the third system, a 900W power supply actually might start to make sense. It's still more than you need, but having a bit of extra room to grow isn't a bad idea. This system idles at over 300W, so it achieves a minimum 86% efficiency with 120VAC. When running a game or other demanding task, the PSU is finally able to reach its potential and provide 89% efficiency with 230VAC (or 87.5% with 120VAC).


both those examples take into consideration both idle and full load usage.

to repost a chart pertaining to the OPs actual usage:

http://i.neoseeker.com/neo_image/202359/article/evga_gtx660ti_sc/powerusage.png

with a single GTX 66ti SC they won't go over 100 watts idle and less than 300 watts under load. so going with a 750 watt PSU max load is 40%. not close to 50% which is the neighborhood of maximum efficiency (50%-60% depending on the PSU).

add another 660ti that runs 18 watts idle and ~150 watts under full load for a power consumption of 117/441 watts and a 750 watt PSU still doesn't make any sense unless it is going full load ~100% of the time with the idle load being under 20% of the rated wattage; which is 150 watts.

i follow jonnyguru also. you quoted a general opinion without any specifics. i believe you are using it out of context. and btw, the mularky i was referring to was:
Quote:
so you get better grade parts, more rigid specs, and most likely tighter QC


like i said before; getting better/higher quality components would be apt to not need any more power.

the build posted would run fine with a 450-500 watt PSU, a 550 with four 6 pin power connections would be able to run a 660ti SLI set up. if the OP wants to get an "oversized" PSU than a 650 watt would be fine. a 750 watt PSU is too much. a 750 watt gold rated PSU would be a waste of money when they sit there idling with ~80% efficiency.

not a good recommendation.


Where in my post referring to better quality parts, more rigid specs, tighter QC, etc
did I state or infer that better quality means more power? I didn't, don't put words in my mouth.


In fact, my specific recs for the posters PSU,s were no where near 750w,
but if he wants better quality than budget/opening price point then I
commend him for it
. Personally, I would go for much less than 750.

But, you are in no position to state that a higher end gpu or cf/sli
aint happening, people on here are constantly upgrading gpu & going
CF/SLI.

And, I still respect jonnyguru's opinion more than yours, and his comment
does apply here.


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a c 288 ) Power supply
February 5, 2013 2:31:24 PM

Anonymous said:
yes it does harm your wallet.

PSU's effciency take a nose dive when below a 20% load, up to 7%, so when the rig runs at idle, which most spend their time at, the money spent getting a 80+, bronze, silver or gold PSU is wasted as the efficiency will be below 80%. when a PSU runs inefficient it gets hot, drying out the capacitors and causing them to fail; decreasing the PSUs life expectancy.

any mularky about SLI/crossfire or future upgrading is no reason to get a PSU with wattage that is unnecessary. if there isn't a budget or money being saved now for any other graphics card for SLI/crossfire then chances are it will not happen - especially with higher range cards. and "higher quality" components do not use any more power than less "quality" components - they would actually use less.

bottom line is a PSU should fit like a glove with the idle wattage 20%+ and max load under 80% of the rated wattage.


I never stated or inferred better quality components/parts used more power,
where are you coming up with this stuff?
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Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
February 5, 2013 3:03:23 PM

toyftw said:
I never stated or inferred better quality components/parts used more power,
where are you coming up with this stuff?


ahh.

my apologies for that, you were referring to the PSU. my bad. though how much wattage a PSU is rated doesn't pertain to it's quality. now that its a gold rated PSU, quite possibly, but there are PSU with gold ratings that fail to achieve bronze standards when reviewed; several on hardware secrets.

however you still have avoided my point: getting too big of a PSU is not a good idea when a lesser one would suffice even for future upgrades. and being an avid reader of JG website you would know that efficiency takes a big nosedive below 20% load, they test for it even though its not a requirement for 80+, bronze, silver, gold or platinum ratings. it would be money wasted.

i really don't care if you respect my opinion or not, i am showing you how you took the quote out of context and i have backed it with data and facts. my self worth isn't dictated by whether anyone likes it or not.


good luck with that, i am done with this - flag deleted*.

(pppst that means any reply will be you talking to yourself . . .)
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