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Windows 7 Install on a Hitachi 1T drive

Last response: in Windows 7
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January 22, 2010 12:56:23 AM

OK, I have an ASUS P5k Pro with the latest BIOS installed with Window 7 Pro 64 BIT. I just bought 2 SATA 1T Hitachi drives (HDS7210CLA332). All sata drives are set o IDE in the BIOS.

At first I added the two drives to my existing Windows 7 installation and all seemed fine, but I did notice that it installed some sort of driver, but couldn't figure out what it was. The drives were recognized after I did a reboot. (The same thing happen in XP SP3 as well.)

I decided to install windows 7 on one of the new drives (after all it was newer and faster), I partition the harddrive to about 500 megs, formatted the partition using window 7 setup (booting up from the DVD), the OS installed, I then let Window 7 do the updates, was forced to reboot, I then get an error that it couldn't find a bootable drive on boot up.

So I reran windows setup tried recover to fix the drive, same error, so went to reinstall window 7 again, this time it told me it could not install the drive on the partion.

So, rebooted back with my original Win7 installation and all was fine with the drives as extra drives in my system.

Anyone have any ideas?
a b $ Windows 7
January 22, 2010 3:30:03 PM

Your best option is to start over and set the drives to ACHI in BIOS then begin a clean install. If you noticed previously that Windows 7 creates a small partiion on your first HDD (around 100 mb) that it uses for a temporary file store for drivers etc.

If your windows install fails again with an error then chances are that the SATA connector is loose on the mobo..... I prefer the ones with the locking clips as I have had drives disappear in windows before and it has been the case the connector is loose.

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a b $ Windows 7
January 22, 2010 6:01:57 PM

I'm afraid I'm confused as to what you are doing.
"At first I added the two drives to my existing Windows 7 installation and all seemed fine"
"The drives were recognized after I did a reboot. (The same thing happen in XP SP3 as well"

So far we have a working W7 instalation and apperently XP as well.

"I decided to install windows 7 on one of them, partition the harddrive to about 500 megs, formatted the partition using window 7 setup"

So is this a second W7 instalation on the same computer? Why?

"So, rebooted back with my original Win7 install a driver (well the comuter recognized the drive and then starting installing a driver, again) I have no idea what it was, and was forced to do yet another reboot, and all was fine with the drives as extra drives in my system."

So what is it you are trying to do? Do you have a working W7 system now?
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January 22, 2010 11:18:35 PM

maybe I can clear up the confusion.

Before I got the new drives, I had a windows 7 installed on another drive. I then added the drives as slaves to make sure they were working with the system. I then proceeded to install windows 7 on the one of the new drives, and after reboot the OS determine that the drive was not a bootable drive even though I installed windows 7 on it.
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a b $ Windows 7
January 23, 2010 2:13:39 AM

Did you disconnect the original drive with the W7 instalation and boot in with the W7 disk to start the installation, or did you try to install it on the new drive from your previous W7 instalation.
We need to know what you did, to be able to help, if you are leaving bits out, it's not helping.
It makes no sense that it install and then the drive is not bootable, unless the boot sector has been placed on another drive.
At this stage my advice is to disconnect all hdd's except for the one with W7 on it, then boot in with the W7 disk, choose custom repair install to fix the bootloader.
Then reconnect your other hdd's.
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January 23, 2010 2:16:20 AM

Well, I figured out the problem I was having with Windows 7 install.

It appears when I originally did my very first install of Windows 7 it took control of the boot partitions for all new installs of Windows 7 on new hard drives while leaving the original drive in the computer and connected.
After several hours of testing I have come to the conclusion that Windows 7, when installed only like to have one active boot partition.
Originally I had Windows XP installed on one drive. Later, I installed Windows 7 on a new drive. When I did this it modified the boot manager to give me the options of booting from Windows 7 and a previous version of windows.
Later I bought a new hard drive, and wanted to make it my Windows 7 installed drive because it was newer and faster.
What I found out was that when I originally installed Windows 7, it turned that drive into the Master Boot Disk (for lack of better terminology). When I installed Windows 7 from booting on the DVD, it did install Windows 7 on the new drive, but didn’t install the boot information it needed because the Master Boot Disk was still connected. And unfortunately did not update the boot manager for the install thus I couldn’t boot to this new copy of Windows 7.
When I installed the Windows 7 from within my old installation of Windows 7, it did update my boot manager on the Master Boot Disk (aka, the old Windows 7 install) and I could choose which OS to boot to. However, I found out when I would unplug the hard drive that had the old Windows 7 installation, the new drive would not boot because it did not have the system files needed to boot the hard drive. Even windows repair would not fix the issue.
The really odd part is that when I first installed Windows 7 on the new drive, I disconnected very other drive and it would boot. That was good, but when I reconnected all my other drives, including the hard drive with the old installation of Windows 7, it seemed to have removed the boot files needed on the new hard drive with the new install of Windows 7.
Very strange as I expected that it would work a lot like XP did in the fact that I could have multiple boot drives with different OS’s on them and could use my bios boot manager to pick the drive to boot from.
Remember that I said I originally had windows XP installed first. I cannot boot from that drive directly, what It does is even more complexing, it booted my new install of Windows 7 on the new hard drive even though through my bios I told it to boot from the XP drive directly.
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