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Fuji Finepix - Delay Before Image Capture

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Anonymous
September 27, 2005 12:35:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Whilst the Fuji Finepix range do indeed take good photos especially in
low light levels, I have found the one that I have has one really
irritating feature that my Pentax SLR 35mm film camera never had. This
is the inordinate delay between pressing the exposure button and the
actual capture of the image. My subjects of preference are wild life
especially underwater, and fast moving objects such as transport
(trains, aircraft, tall ships, etc.). However just when I think I've
framed a good shot and have a split-second to capture the image the
Fuji decides to think about it before capturing it and meanwhile the
subject composition has changed completely and the shot is lost
forever. Has Fuji or anyone else cracked this problem? I'm in the
market for a top-of-the-range digital SLR but NOT if there are any such
image capture problems. Thanks - CJB.
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 9:41:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

CJB <chrisjbrady03_nospam@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
|| Whilst the Fuji Finepix range do indeed take good photos
|| especially in low light levels, I have found the one that I
|| have has one really irritating feature that my Pentax SLR
|| 35mm film camera never had. This is the inordinate delay
|| between pressing the exposure button and the actual capture
|| of the image. My subjects of preference are wild life
|| especially underwater, and fast moving objects such as
|| transport (trains, aircraft, tall ships, etc.). However just
|| when I think I've framed a good shot and have a split-second
|| to capture the image the Fuji decides to think about it
|| before capturing it and meanwhile the subject composition has
|| changed completely and the shot is lost forever. Has Fuji or
|| anyone else cracked this problem? I'm in the market for a
|| top-of-the-range digital SLR but NOT if there are any such
|| image capture problems. Thanks - CJB.

Does the delay actually occur before capturing the image or is
the delay after capturing the image while writing it to the
memory chip?

I have used an older model point and shot Fuji FinePix for
sometime and have noticed no such problems.

BJ

--
"There are no limits [to stupidity or kookdom], only extremes we
haven't reached yet." -- Quaestor
September 27, 2005 10:22:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'm not an expert by any means, but all non DSLR digital cameras have a
delay between pressing the shutter button (already exposure & focus locked)
and the picture being taken. I've seen this vary upto about 300ms just on
the digi-cams I've owned.

There's nothing you can do about it, apart from prepare for it, i.e press
the shutter button just before the shot you want. I found out how hard this
was at the Monaco GP this year ...

My DSLR and related reports I've read seem to have dramtically reduced delay
(100ms or less) which is hardly noticeable.

Alex

"BJ in Texas" <bjtexas@hotmale.con> wrote in message
news:6vf_e.3152$KQ5.2765@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
> CJB <chrisjbrady03_nospam@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
> || Whilst the Fuji Finepix range do indeed take good photos
> || especially in low light levels, I have found the one that I
> || have has one really irritating feature that my Pentax SLR
> || 35mm film camera never had. This is the inordinate delay
> || between pressing the exposure button and the actual capture
> || of the image. My subjects of preference are wild life
> || especially underwater, and fast moving objects such as
> || transport (trains, aircraft, tall ships, etc.). However just
> || when I think I've framed a good shot and have a split-second
> || to capture the image the Fuji decides to think about it
> || before capturing it and meanwhile the subject composition has
> || changed completely and the shot is lost forever. Has Fuji or
> || anyone else cracked this problem? I'm in the market for a
> || top-of-the-range digital SLR but NOT if there are any such
> || image capture problems. Thanks - CJB.
>
> Does the delay actually occur before capturing the image or is
> the delay after capturing the image while writing it to the
> memory chip?
>
> I have used an older model point and shot Fuji FinePix for
> sometime and have noticed no such problems.
>
> BJ
>
> --
> "There are no limits [to stupidity or kookdom], only extremes we
> haven't reached yet." -- Quaestor
>
>
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Anonymous
September 27, 2005 11:20:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Alex <alex.cruse@btinternet.com> wrote:
|| I'm not an expert by any means, but all non DSLR digital
|| cameras have a delay between pressing the shutter button
|| (already exposure & focus locked) and the picture being
|| taken. I've seen this vary upto about 300ms just on the
|| digi-cams I've owned.
||
|| There's nothing you can do about it, apart from prepare for
|| it, i.e press the shutter button just before the shot you
|| want. I found out how hard this was at the Monaco GP this
|| year ...
||
|| My DSLR and related reports I've read seem to have
|| dramtically reduced delay (100ms or less) which is hardly
|| noticeable.
||
|| Alex
||

Is this significantly worse than the film SLRs that we have
lived with for years?

BJ
--
"Everyone has a photographic memory, some just don't have film."
-- Steven Wright
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 7:07:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

The delay is between seeing the shot in the viewfinder screen, deciding
that this is the composure required, and pressing the button. This
latter action then seems to cause the camera to think for a while
before attempting an image capture. Meanwhile the subject(s) have
moved, become blurred, or someone has walked in front, etc. Whilst it
is possible to anticipate some repositioning of the subject(s) in
advance, it makes split second decision making to take a once in a life
time shot almost impossible. The day seems to be inthe order of a
second or two. With my 35mm film SLR as soon as the button is pressed
the image is captured without any delay at all. CJB.
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 2:44:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

CJB wrote:
> The delay is between seeing the shot in the viewfinder screen,
> deciding that this is the composure required, and pressing the
> button. This latter action then seems to cause the camera to think
> for a while before attempting an image capture. Meanwhile the
> subject(s) have moved, become blurred, or someone has walked in
> front, etc. Whilst it is possible to anticipate some repositioning of
> the subject(s) in advance, it makes split second decision making to
> take a once in a life time shot almost impossible. The day seems to
> be inthe order of a second or two. With my 35mm film SLR as soon as
> the button is pressed the image is captured without any delay at all.
> CJB.

For any critical timing shot, many cameras allow you to depress the
shutter release half way to focus on and expose for the subject, followed
by a final full press at the required moment. The delay is much reduced
in this mode - to a small fraction of a second.

Any camera - SLR or point-and-shoot - will have an inherent delay, and
part of using equipment to its best is to know how to compensate for that
delay.

David
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 2:52:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

BJ in Texas wrote:
> Alex <alex.cruse@btinternet.com> wrote:
>|| I'm not an expert by any means, but all non DSLR digital
>|| cameras have a delay between pressing the shutter button
>|| (already exposure & focus locked) and the picture being
>|| taken. I've seen this vary upto about 300ms just on the
>|| digi-cams I've owned.

The newer equipment is reducing this delay. The newest DSLRs have
little or no delay. As new models replace the less expensive non SLR
digital cameras they will benefit as well.


>||
>|| There's nothing you can do about it, apart from prepare for
>|| it, i.e press the shutter button just before the shot you
>|| want. I found out how hard this was at the Monaco GP this
>|| year ...
>||
>|| My DSLR and related reports I've read seem to have
>|| dramtically reduced delay (100ms or less) which is hardly
>|| noticeable.
>||
>|| Alex
>||
>
> Is this significantly worse than the film SLRs that we have
> lived with for years?

Yes.

>
> BJ

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
!