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New Linux Build

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September 20, 2012 9:19:33 PM

Well I've picked out some parts and I'd like to know what you think.

This is for a new all-around PC running Ubuntu Linux (12.04 LTS). I will do some light to moderate gaming and that will probably be the most demanding thing I do, but I may also do some multitracking/recording later.

Let me know what you think, if you have opinions/alterntives.

I am ESPECIALLY interested if any of you linux guru's have anything to say, because this will be my first linux build.

Thanks!


Kingston Technology HyperX 8 GB (2x4 GB Modules) 1600 MHz DDR3 Dual Channel Kit (PC3 12800) 240-Pin SDRAM KHX1600C9D3K2/8GX - Kingston H. Corporation


Western Digital Caviar Blue 500 GB SATA III 7200 RPM 16 MB Cache Bulk/OEM Desktop Hard Drive - WD5000AAKX - Western Digital


Asus 24xDVD-RW Serial ATA Internal OEM Drive DRW-24B1ST (Black) - Asus


Seasonic 80Plus Power Supply M12II 620 BRONZE - Seasonic


Intel Core i5-3570K Quad-Core Processor 3.4 GHz 4 Core LGA 1155 - BX80637I53570K - Intel


Corsair Carbide Series 300R Mid-Tower Gaming Case - CC-9011014-WW - Corsair


ASUS P8Z77-V LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard - Asus







More about : linux build

September 20, 2012 9:32:12 PM

If you want to game, you'll need a GPU.
September 20, 2012 9:34:57 PM

HD 4000 included on chip is supported by linux and performs comparably to most of the sub - $100 discrete video cards. I plan to use it until I decide I need something better.
Related resources
September 20, 2012 10:14:10 PM

I would suggest thinking about upgrading your Ram to 12 or 16gb, if you'll be running games with Wine / Play on Linux. I upgraded my system to 8gb of 1600 and Wine drags my system down quite a bit.
September 20, 2012 11:38:57 PM

You could save a mint going with llano for light gaming. You could wait for trinity if you want even better, but llano already beats intel's HD4000 and the speed is not bad at all. Here someone did it for $300 http://www.legitreviews.com/article/2019/1/

There were some bugs originally, but I believe they have fixed the issue a few months ago.
September 21, 2012 12:28:06 AM

RAM isn't what makes Wine run slow. It's because it's not native and not made for Linux. I would suggest a 7750 for right now, if you're gaming.
September 21, 2012 1:09:18 AM

Thanks for the link, I will read through it. However, it appears it was built for Windows XP. Do you run linux on a llano system? My concern is this--I am by no means a linux expert. These parts need to be more or less plug and play under ubuntu. I have read that intel has much better support for their linux drivers, which is one major reason I selected an intel setup. If anyone has experience with Ubuntu under llano I'd love to hear about it, or if you can find me a link, that would be great to. I'm definitely willing to consider it, I just need to be sure that everything will run trouble-free under ubuntu. I know that often things will run but suffer huge performance hits under certain situations with different drivers. Also I'm not great with this stuff, but it seems like I read something about USB 3 not being native under AMD chipsets at some point? Or did I completely make this up?

Would welcome any comments on the pro's and con's of going with llano, especially under linux. I would definitely like to save some cash.

Thanks!

Din65 said:
You could save a mint going with llano for light gaming. You could wait for trinity if you want even better, but llano already beats intel's HD4000 and the speed is not bad at all. Here someone did it for $300 http://www.legitreviews.com/article/2019/1/

There were some bugs originally, but I believe they have fixed the issue a few months ago.

September 21, 2012 1:40:16 AM

A few months ago I built a Linux machine using the llano A4-3400. It does run nicely once the drivers are installed. The big problem I had was actually just getting a Linux operating system installed. I tried several (Mint, Mint debian, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Debian Squeeze, Lubuntu, Vector) but none of those would work with the installation cd... even with the boot options usually used (nomodeset, noapci and others). Finally, Xubuntu 12.04 successfully installed but it was still a hassle. So, I recommend going with either the Intel cpu or the mainstream AMD cpu's unless you are willing to endure some frustration while trying to get something working well on a llano apu.
September 21, 2012 1:53:01 AM

I'm running Arch Linux, on a new build. My experience:

1) Intel HD Graphics work out of the box. It should be sufficient for daily use with all desktop effects and 3D enabled. Even my 4 year old laptop with GM965 can work well.

2) ATI Open Source drivers will not support the most recent cards. There's a one cycle delay. You can still get the ATI-Catalyst drivers though, they work well.

3) Boot in UEFI mode. There should be an option in your BIOS. Choose UEFI - Asus DVD as the first boot priority. Otherwise the install might not work.

4) Your motherboard will work fine. Asus has good compatibility with Linux.

5) Linux itself is very light on RAM. I'm running a KDE desktop (full bells and whistles), and the RAM usage tops 600 MB.


Your build seems perfectly alright.

I'd suggest add an SSD (cuts down boot times and program load times. My linux boots in 5 seconds, and programs open instantly :p ), and mount the root on that, your HDD being home.
September 21, 2012 1:56:11 AM

Exactly the kind of info I was looking for. Thanks for your help!

spankmon said:
A few months ago I built a Linux machine using the llano A4-3400. It does run nicely once the drivers are installed. The big problem I had was actually just getting a Linux operating system installed. I tried several (Mint, Mint debian, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Debian Squeeze, Lubuntu, Vector) but none of those would work with the installation cd... even with the boot options usually used (nomodeset, noapci and others). Finally, Xubuntu 12.04 successfully installed but it was still a hassle. So, I recommend going with either the Intel cpu or the mainstream AMD cpu's unless you are willing to endure some frustration while trying to get something working well on a llano apu.

September 21, 2012 2:00:34 AM

Thanks for the advice. Originally I was planning on getting the OCZ vertex 4 128g ssd. But it is $30 bucks more than the HDD and considerably smaller. Still haven't decided for sure. Any special configurations for SSD under linux, or can I just pop it in like any other drive?


proton007 said:
I'm running Arch Linux, on a new build. My experience:

1) Intel HD Graphics work out of the box.

2) ATI Open Source drivers will not support the most recent cards. There's a one cycle delay. You can still get the ATI-Catalyst drivers though, they work well.

Your build seems perfectly alright.
I'd suggest add an SSD (cuts down boot times and program load times. My linux boots in 5 seconds, and programs open instantly :p ), and mount the root on that, your HDD being home.

September 21, 2012 2:18:14 AM

kraut2001 said:
Thanks for the advice. Originally I was planning on getting the OCZ vertex 4 128g ssd. But it is $30 bucks more than the HDD and considerably smaller. Still haven't decided for sure. Any special configurations for SSD under linux, or can I just pop it in like any other drive?


I updated my post above. ^^

Special configs for SSD:

1) Mount your root, boot and swap partitions on the SSD. Or only root + swap depending on the partition layout. Use your HDD for home partition data.
2) The UEFI system partition also on the SSD. About 200MB.
3) Mount /tmp at tmpfs, it keeps your temp files on the ram instead of using SSD every now and then. Archlinux does it by default. I think Ubuntu also does.
4) Read up: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Solid_State_Drives. Mostly very small tweaks.

Point 4 is not really required, but recommended for optimal performance. Most SSDs nowadays are good enough, and will last 3-5 years with wear leveling before any cell degradation sets in.

Also, unless you have a lot of programs, 64 GB should suffice for SSD. The default install will only occupy a few gigs. I'm using a 64GB Corsair Force GT with 1 TB WD Caviar Black
September 23, 2012 7:08:33 AM

UPDATE:

Realized I really shouldn't be spending so much right now, and decided to swap out for:

-a much cheaper case

-a 500 watt power supply (instead of the 620)

-the just-released i3 3225 (instead of the i5)

-and the GIGABYTE GA-Z77-D3H mobo (instead of the asus p8z77-v) (unfortunately i'll have to buy a separate wifi card now but i will still save money)

All told this should chop off about $150 bucks. Anybody see any problems? You think its worth it?

I don't do a lot of heavy duty stuff and I figure the most intensive thing I would do would be the occasional game, but I don't feel that the i3 will bottle neck me unless I was buying a $300 video card which will NEVER happen.

The item I'm most concerned about is the switch to the much cheaper motherboard. Would definitely like some opinions on that.

Thanks
!