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Music Production, Basic Use & Video Editing PC

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September 21, 2012 11:12:07 PM

Hi everyone, new to the forums.

My old Fujitsu PC died the other day so I'm in need of a new PC.

I've been reading through the threads but i'm still quite lost as to what I need for my parts.

I intend to use a website that will build the comp with the parts specified.

Approximate Purchase Date: Latest, Christmas holidays.

Budget Range: $1300 - $1500

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Music production, basic use (e.g. browsing internet, creating documents etc), in future may try video editing but if this substantially complicates recommendations it's not important.

Are you buying a monitor: For now no, I will be using my current HP W19 Monitor HP W19
I would like to add another monitor in future to have dual monitors.


Parts to Upgrade: None

Do you need to buy OS: Yes - Windows 7 Home Premium or Professional (XP Mode?) which should upgrade to Windows 8.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: None

Location: UK

Parts Preferences: Intel CPU

Overclocking: Maybe at some point in future.

SLI or Crossfire: As I would most likely never play games I think no?

Your Monitor Resolution:1440 x 900

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: My last computer broke so I figured it would be better to have custom built than store built.

Additional Comments: I would prefer to have a quiet PC.

Also I intend to connect turntables and a mixer to the computer via the sound card line in or perhaps an amp. I would use the mic socket of the mixer to record any miscellaneous sounds or vocals, nothing too intense.

I would like at least one firewire port and also PCI Audio interface for midi to connect a music keyboard in future.

I already have a mouse and keyboard, these are USB.

I believe I need a good sound card for audio but maybe I could use the onboard sound card of the mobo for now and get this later?

I've seen some parts recommended in other threads e.g. in this thread:

Music Production PC .

CPU

Here CPU that was recommended was an intel Core i7-3770K. I saw other threads that mentioned i5-3570K, would it be more beneficial for the i7r due to future proofing?

Motherboard

The Motherboard that was recommended was ASRock Z77 Extreme 4 but I saw people mentioning Asus P8Z77V-LK in the comments section of this thread: Seven Sub-$160 Z77 Express Motherboards, Reviewed .

Would the ASRock be better than the Asus? Bear in mind I have absolutely no idea so I am just asking for my own knowledge.

PSU

I would like a power supply in the 500+ range, maybe 620 - 700? I'm only suggesting this for future proofing as well.

SSD

An SSD would be needed to store the main programs, in this thread Best SSDs For The Money: August 2012

I saw that these four were recommended:

Mushkin Enhanced Chronos - 90GB ($80 System Drive)
Samsung 830 - 128GB (Because unlike Sand Force's DuraClass tech, it doesn't demonstrate diff behaviour with incompressible data - $100 Performance Drive)
OCZ Vertex 4 - 128GB ($115 Performance Drive)
Plextor M3 Pro ($160 Performance Drive)

HDD

1TB with 7200 RPM drive?

RAM

As much as possible?

Optical Drive

Nothing too flash, just something that does the job and does not have too many problems reading scratched discs.

Forgot to mention, maybe I could throw in a TV tuner as well?

Finally, would overclocking be beneficial in future or should I just stick with stock speeds?

When stating your choices, could you include a brief explanation as to why you have chosen that part for my own knowledge.

Thanks.

Excuse me if my post is long winded, I thought that by adding as much detail as I could think of, it would aid in carrying out the process.

If I have missed anything please do let me know.

a b B Homebuilt system
September 21, 2012 11:50:28 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($83.74 @ Mwave)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($188.75 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair XMS3 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($95.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7750 1GB Video Card ($116.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Antec Three Hundred Two ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $1101.41
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-21 19:47 EDT-0400)

There you go :) 

You could throw in your own TV tuner in there if you'd like, as well as a sound card. I'm not very familiar with those so you will have to ask others in the community for advice in that department :lol: 

Music production is very CPU-intensive, and you will DEFINITELY benefit from getting an i7-3770k. I put a VERY beefy CPU cooler in this rig to give you a massive OC potential in the future if you so desired.

Considering this is not a gaming rig, you don't need a massive GPU, i.e, you don't need a very big PSU. 550w will do more than enough for the years to come and considering CPU's power draw is only getting better and better, it will definitely be something you can carry onto future builds.

I went with the ASUS P8Z77-V due to the nature of the board and it's resistance to flexing too much with massive coolers. The NH-D14 is huge, and I mean HUGE. The ASRock Extreme 4 Z77 may bend a little bit in the future which may cause it to shorten the life; I'm not taking that chance.

I just noticed you said you wanted a firewire port, you can purchase add-on cards on Newegg for a very reasonable price, so you will have to look it up yourself :)  I'm not very familiar in this department as well :lol: 

If you have anymore questions, feel free to let me know and I'll be more than happy to be of assistance.
September 22, 2012 12:01:40 AM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor (£251.52 @ CCL Computers)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler (£55.95 @ Ebuyer)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme6 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£140.12 @ Scan.co.uk)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£71.36 @ CCL Computers)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£76.78 @ Scan.co.uk)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk (£158.70 @ Scan.co.uk)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (£317.99 @ Amazon UK)
Sound Card: Asus Xonar DX 24-bit 192 KHz Sound Card (£58.50 @ CCL Computers)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case (£89.81 @ Scan.co.uk)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (£49.99 @ Amazon UK)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS224-06 DVD/CD Writer
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (64-bit) (£103.93 @ CCL Computers)
Total: £1374.65
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-22 00:58 BST+0100)

This build is similar to Mocchan's, but with a few differences:
1. I put a very beefy GPU to help with your video editing.
2. More space on the SSD.
3. Sound card. This one is really popular.
4. I used UK sites.
Related resources
September 22, 2012 12:13:33 AM

Thanks very much Mocchan and fpoon.

Fpoon, is there a reason why you changed the memory as well?

Also, is there any likelihood that if I wait to buy the parts something new will come out by Christmas thus making this list obsolete?
September 22, 2012 12:17:20 AM

derigueur said:
Thanks very much Mocchan and fpoon.

Fpoon, is there a reason why you changed the memory as well?

Also, is there any likelihood that if I wait to buy the parts something new will come out by Christmas thus making this list obsolete?


Video editing can use up a lot of memory, particularly in rendering.
a b B Homebuilt system
September 22, 2012 12:22:36 AM

There is something always new coming around the corner, I'm not sure about this December, however, so no, this current rig will not become obsolete.

I also agree to fpoon's suggestion of a 2x8GB kit of RAM apposed to 4x4GB, this leaves OP with PLENTY of room to upgrade to 32GB of RAM in the future if he wished. Doing some video editing myself, yes, it does eat up a lot of RAM and having more is better in this case :lol: 

I would highly recommend fpoon's rig as it's very similar to mine but with better-optimized/well thought out components. The only thing I would change, however, is the PSU. HD7970 isn't that much of a power hog, however, I would probably swap it out for a 650w unit just for some peace of mind while doing OCing.
September 22, 2012 12:45:06 AM

mocchan said:
There is something always new coming around the corner, I'm not sure about this December, however, so no, this current rig will not become obsolete.

I also agree to fpoon's suggestion of a 2x8GB kit of RAM apposed to 4x4GB, this leaves OP with PLENTY of room to upgrade to 32GB of RAM in the future if he wished. Doing some video editing myself, yes, it does eat up a lot of RAM and having more is better in this case :lol: 

I would highly recommend fpoon's rig as it's very similar to mine but with better-optimized/well thought out components. The only thing I would change, however, is the PSU. HD7970 isn't that much of a power hog, however, I would probably swap it out for a 650w unit just for some peace of mind while doing OCing.


Ok thanks Mocchan.

These 650W PSU's were recommended on this site:

A list of recommended PSUs

but alot of newegg reviews show them as DOA:

Seasonic X650

Rosewill Capstone 650W

Corsair 650TX V2

However this 620W seems reliable:

Seasonic M12II 620W

Could you recommend any other PSU's?



September 22, 2012 12:46:23 AM

fpoon said:
Video editing can use up a lot of memory, particularly in rendering.


Thanks fpoon.

Oh and I forgot to ask, is there a reason why you went with the ASRock Extreme 6 over the AsusP8Z77?

Do you know if these sites reputable or just those which have cheapest priced parts?
September 22, 2012 12:59:43 AM

derigueur said:
Thanks fpoon.

Do you know if these sites reputable or just those which have cheapest priced parts?


All of PCPartPicker's sites are pretty reliable, I don't live in the UK myself but I've heard about Ebuyer, Amazon, Scan, and Overclockers.

As for power supplies, 550W would be the safe zone for non-overclockers. However, the only brands you should trust are Antec, Corsair, Enermax, NZXT, Seasonic, and XFX. I don't believe Rosewill sells anything in the UK (it's actually owned by Newegg), and other brands can fail on you or even fry your system. Go for 80+ Bronze if you are on a budget, if not you can get a really nice 80+ Gold one.

80+ Bronze:
Antec HCG 620
Corsair TX650 V2
XFX Core 650W
Seasonic M12II 620 Bronze

80+ Gold:
Seasonic X660 Gold
a b B Homebuilt system
September 22, 2012 1:06:04 AM

^ +1 to list

Also, don't take every "DOA" newegg review seriously, to be honest, I've used the Seasonic and Corsair unit you listed above and I have NOT had a single one be DOA.

I've built around 6 rigs with said power supplies, they're very reliable and are a great value. The Seasonic unit - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... is a GREAT value. It's 80+ gold for $130...you hardly ever see that.
April 3, 2013 7:09:03 AM

Hi fpoon and mocchan. I've been buying the parts bit by bit but I have been finding that the prices keep increasing!
Is there a specific season when computer parts prices increase or is this just something that happens?

The Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card itself seems to have sold out in alot of places, do you know if it is being replaced so it won't come back in stock or just selling like hotcakes?

a c 113 B Homebuilt system
April 4, 2013 7:24:23 PM

Why in the world would you need a 7970? At most, you might need a mid-range Nvidia card for CUDA. Video editing is 2D work and does not require a special video card at all. Some rendering can be helped quite a bit by using the GPU to do the work normally done by the CPU.

So, you might look at a GTX 660... but then your video editing is not listed as a priority. So really, a GTX 550 or 550ti would be just fine.
This is all dependent on what programs you are using. Look up whatever program you will use in relation to CUDA... that will tell you quick.
GTX 550ti
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Asus-GeForce-Graphics-Dual-link...

My understanding is that you still need a PSU. You seem to want a very good one, and that means one built by Seasonic or Superflower, with possibly an option or two made by Delta or CWT. You do not need 650 or 750W given your hardware needs.

Checking Scan:

Seasonic G series 450W
http://www.scan.co.uk/products/450w-seasonic-g-450-80-p...
This is what you would get with the 7750 that was suggested. 450W would work just fine there.

Amazon
Seasonic X560
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Seasonic-X-560-Watt-Power-Suppl...
That would be adequate with one of the GPUs I have suggested.

That's the two best options. Seems like the UK does not have a good selection or prices in PSUs currently.
April 4, 2013 10:11:26 PM

Proximon said:
Why in the world would you need a 7970? At most, you might need a mid-range Nvidia card for CUDA. Video editing is 2D work and does not require a special video card at all. Some rendering can be helped quite a bit by using the GPU to do the work normally done by the CPU.

So, you might look at a GTX 660... but then your video editing is not listed as a priority. So really, a GTX 550 or 550ti would be just fine.
This is all dependent on what programs you are using. Look up whatever program you will use in relation to CUDA... that will tell you quick.
GTX 550ti
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Asus-GeForce-Graphics-Dual-link...

My understanding is that you still need a PSU. You seem to want a very good one, and that means one built by Seasonic or Superflower, with possibly an option or two made by Delta or CWT. You do not need 650 or 750W given your hardware needs.

Checking Scan:

Seasonic G series 450W
http://www.scan.co.uk/products/450w-seasonic-g-450-80-p...
This is what you would get with the 7750 that was suggested. 450W would work just fine there.

Amazon
Seasonic X560
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Seasonic-X-560-Watt-Power-Suppl...
That would be adequate with one of the GPUs I have suggested.

That's the two best options. Seems like the UK does not have a good selection or prices in PSUs currently.


Wow, lucky I have not bought the 7970 yet then. In what instances would the 7970 be better for, if i was doing computer aided design instead?

Are the GTX's any good for picture editing software e.g. photoshop as well?
Also I bought ASRock Extreme 6, should I return it for the AsusP8Z77?

Finally, does this mean that I still need the Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case or should i go back for Antec Three Hundred Two ATX Mid Tower Case?


a c 113 B Homebuilt system
April 4, 2013 11:28:18 PM

Well, AMD gaming cards are not generally used in that type of role.

There is graphics display. Especially when 3D objects are rendered on the screen, this takes a lot of GPU power. AMD and Nvidia GPUs are both good at this.

Then there is GPU computing. This is where the power of the GPU processors are CONVERTED temporarily to do other types of work. Work that would normally be done by the CPU. Nvidia cards use a type of program called CUDA. This is the most popular and widely used method of GPU computing. There is a type of GPU computing that uses AMD cards, but generally speaking Nvidia CUDA has a broader range of usage.

Again, none of this matter AT ALL if the specific program you are using does not support it.

Here is an example of Photoshop being accelerated with CUDA
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/adobe-cs5-cuda-64-b...

Here is Sony Vegas Pro using BOTH kinds of GPU computing (older cards)
http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/vegaspro/gpuacceler...


If you were doing 3D work, or CAD, which is really 3D, then you might get a card like that... but only IF you were gaming also. Serious 3D modelers and such use workstation grade cards.

All gaming cards are designed for games. They just happen to have a secondary computing use and are much less expensive than workstation cards.

The ASRock Extreme6 is a fine MB for overclocking. It's probably a bit overkill for your needs, but I see no reason to return it.

You should choose a case that has adequate cooling and good acoustic qualities. Given your usage a quiet PC must be your biggest concern. The CPU cooler fpoon recommended is very quiet and a good choice. I would take some of the money you saved on the GPU and put it towards a case upgrade.

Quiet cases recommended by Silent PC Review
http://www.silentpcreview.com/article75-page5.html

My recommendation: and it happens to be a beautiful case made by a company with fantastic support

Silvertone Fortress
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Silverstone-Technology-SilvSton...

April 4, 2013 11:38:34 PM

Proximon said:
Well, AMD gaming cards are not generally used in that type of role.

There is graphics display. Especially when 3D objects are rendered on the screen, this takes a lot of GPU power. AMD and Nvidia GPUs are both good at this.

Then there is GPU computing. This is where the power of the GPU processors are CONVERTED temporarily to do other types of work. Work that would normally be done by the CPU. Nvidia cards use a type of program called CUDA. This is the most popular and widely used method of GPU computing. There is a type of GPU computing that uses AMD cards, but generally speaking Nvidia CUDA has a broader range of usage.

Again, none of this matter AT ALL if the specific program you are using does not support it.

Here is an example of Photoshop being accelerated with CUDA
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/adobe-cs5-cuda-64-b...

Here is Sony Vegas Pro using BOTH kinds of GPU computing (older cards)
http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/vegaspro/gpuacceler...


If you were doing 3D work, or CAD, which is really 3D, then you might get a card like that... but only IF you were gaming also. Serious 3D modelers and such use workstation grade cards.

All gaming cards are designed for games. They just happen to have a secondary computing use and are much less expensive than workstation cards.

The ASRock Extreme6 is a fine MB for overclocking. It's probably a bit overkill for your needs, but I see no reason to return it.

You should choose a case that has adequate cooling and good acoustic qualities. Given your usage a quiet PC must be your biggest concern. The CPU cooler fpoon recommended is very quiet and a good choice. I would take some of the money you saved on the GPU and put it towards a case upgrade.

Quiet cases recommended by Silent PC Review
http://www.silentpcreview.com/article75-page5.html

My recommendation: and it happens to be a beautiful case made by a company with fantastic support

Silvertone Fortress
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Silverstone-Technology-SilvSton...



Thanks Proximon for taking the time out to explain everything & save me some money (& anger lol).

a b B Homebuilt system
April 5, 2013 12:41:07 AM

For beginner to partly-serious video editing purposes (even 3D rendering or CAD) and as long as you do not plan to go real serious and want really to invest to the editing/rendering stuffs, you can simply get any mid-classed gaming GPUs or any workstation GPUs.

I usually go for gaming GPUs..I could never resist the seduction to play games on the new system after a few months ^o^ This is why I always pick the main-stream GPUs such as my 2 years old HD6850
I do only light to fun-based video editing once in a while for family and friends along with some light weight CAD + drawings for home office purposes...no need to do serious investment for me regarding editing/rendering issues:) 



April 5, 2013 6:36:57 AM

guanyu210379 said:
For beginner to partly-serious video editing purposes (even 3D rendering or CAD) and as long as you do not plan to go real serious and want really to invest to the editing/rendering stuffs, you can simply get any mid-classed gaming GPUs or any workstation GPUs.

I usually go for gaming GPUs..I could never resist the seduction to play games on the new system after a few months ^o^ This is why I always pick the main-stream GPUs such as my 2 years old HD6850
I do only light to fun-based video editing once in a while for family and friends along with some light weight CAD + drawings for home office purposes...no need to do serious investment for me regarding editing/rendering issues:) 





Yeah, that's basically what I was restricting it to, just small time video editing for family, friends, myself. Its more important for music production.
April 9, 2013 7:41:16 AM

Proximon said:

My understanding is that you still need a PSU. You seem to want a very good one, and that means one built by Seasonic or Superflower, with possibly an option or two made by Delta or CWT. You do not need 650 or 750W given your hardware needs.

Checking Scan:

Seasonic G series 450W
http://www.scan.co.uk/products/450w-seasonic-g-450-80-p...
This is what you would get with the 7750 that was suggested. 450W would work just fine there.

Amazon
Seasonic X560
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Seasonic-X-560-Watt-Power-Suppl...
That would be adequate with one of the GPUs I have suggested.

That's the two best options. Seems like the UK does not have a good selection or prices in PSUs currently.


Proximon, can you recommend any Cosair PSUs similar to the Seasonic you linked as I have found the X660 for £3 more than the X560 you suggested and the Platinum 750w for £15 more than the X660.

Thanks

April 9, 2013 12:11:45 PM

Proximon said:
The equivalent corsair PSUs seems to be more. There is the HX650
http://www.dabs.com/products/corsair-650w-gold-professi...
Made by Seasonic, very nice.

For a bit less there is this Seasonic 550W
http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00918MEZG/?tag=pcp0f-21
Another very nice PSU

There is the TX650M
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Corsair-CP-9020002-UK-Enthusias...
But that is a step down in quality. Still very nice.


Thanks mate. Hmmm, like you said, the prices over here really aren't that good lol. I know you said I don't really need it but since the difference is so minor i'll get the X660. Might come in handy 1 day.
a c 113 B Homebuilt system
April 9, 2013 1:51:04 PM

It may very well be the quietest of all the selections, and that is important to you. Just be aware that it is SUPPOSED to be dead quiet in your build. If the fan is spinning too much or you hear coil whine out of it, have it replaced. That's true for all the selections... PSUs are complicated with a lot of parts, and there is some variation as a result. You are paying for the best so insist on it.
!