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Unlocking - benefits?

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July 8, 2004 10:39:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.rogersatt (More info?)

Hi, gurus:

I'm a bit confused. Someone at the richmond night market offered to
'unlock' my phone - for $40. soemthing about "so you can use your phone
on other networks."

but unless I really want to move from Rogers to Fido and keep the same
phone, if not, what other benefits are there to unlocking phones?

Like, if I go and use the phone in, say, Florida - how does that
work? Does unlocking help?

Curious -
--
MooCow

More about : unlocking benefits

Anonymous
July 14, 2004 1:50:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.rogersatt (More info?)

I found that unlocking my phone was beneficial when I travel to Europe
and China. When I am there I can purchase a local SIM card very
cheaply and use the phone on the local networks. If you keep your
Rogers SIM card in place you would pay a fortune in long distance
charges. Before swapping the card I call forward my Canadian Rogers
SIM number to my new local foreign number. That way my local contacts
can contact me without paying long distance charges.



On Thu, 8 Jul 2004 18:39:15 +0000 (UTC), MooCow <xmoocowx@vceen.bc.ca>
wrote:

>Hi, gurus:
>
>I'm a bit confused. Someone at the richmond night market offered to
>'unlock' my phone - for $40. soemthing about "so you can use your phone
>on other networks."
>
>but unless I really want to move from Rogers to Fido and keep the same
>phone, if not, what other benefits are there to unlocking phones?
>
>Like, if I go and use the phone in, say, Florida - how does that
>work? Does unlocking help?
>
>Curious -
Anonymous
July 14, 2004 1:50:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.rogersatt (More info?)

On Tue, 13 Jul 2004 21:50:33 +0000, Philip Uglow wrote:

> I found that unlocking my phone was beneficial when I travel to Europe and
> China. When I am there I can purchase a local SIM card very cheaply and
> use the phone on the local networks. If you keep your Rogers SIM card in
> place you would pay a fortune in long distance charges. Before swapping
> the card I call forward my Canadian Rogers SIM number to my new local
> foreign number. That way my local contacts can contact me without paying
> long distance charges.

I have heard this mentioned a few times about Europe. Is there anything
equivalent in the states? Specifically Arizona? I'll be there for a short
while and getting a local SIM and a small amount of air time would be
nice. Thanks, TTYL
Related resources
Anonymous
July 14, 2004 10:10:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.rogersatt (More info?)

On Tue, 13 Jul 2004 20:07:00 -0400, repatch <repatch42@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>On Tue, 13 Jul 2004 21:50:33 +0000, Philip Uglow wrote:
>
>> I found that unlocking my phone was beneficial when I travel to Europe and
>> China. When I am there I can purchase a local SIM card very cheaply and
>> use the phone on the local networks. If you keep your Rogers SIM card in
>> place you would pay a fortune in long distance charges. Before swapping
>> the card I call forward my Canadian Rogers SIM number to my new local
>> foreign number. That way my local contacts can contact me without paying
>> long distance charges.
>
>I have heard this mentioned a few times about Europe. Is there anything
>equivalent in the states? Specifically Arizona? I'll be there for a short
>while and getting a local SIM and a small amount of air time would be
>nice. Thanks, TTYL

I have not traveled in that areas so can't help you out.
Anonymous
July 15, 2004 7:11:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.rogersatt (More info?)

How do you forward your Rogers SIM number to a European SIM number? I have
been a regular traveller to the UK over the past three years and use a UK
based pay as you go SIM in my unlocked phone when travelling. When I tried
to forward my phone I was unable to do so. The forwarding service appears to
have restrictions on the number of digits. When I called Rogers, they
indicated they could only forward to a 10 digit (North American) number.


"Philip Uglow" <philip@uglow.ca> wrote in message
news:h5m8f0dmnd6f0kvg4njv9cmh3q84hb4vrg@4ax.com...
> I found that unlocking my phone was beneficial when I travel to Europe
> and China. When I am there I can purchase a local SIM card very
> cheaply and use the phone on the local networks. If you keep your
> Rogers SIM card in place you would pay a fortune in long distance
> charges. Before swapping the card I call forward my Canadian Rogers
> SIM number to my new local foreign number. That way my local contacts
> can contact me without paying long distance charges.
>
>
>
> On Thu, 8 Jul 2004 18:39:15 +0000 (UTC), MooCow <xmoocowx@vceen.bc.ca>
> wrote:
>
> >Hi, gurus:
> >
> >I'm a bit confused. Someone at the richmond night market offered to
> >'unlock' my phone - for $40. soemthing about "so you can use your phone
> >on other networks."
> >
> >but unless I really want to move from Rogers to Fido and keep the same
> >phone, if not, what other benefits are there to unlocking phones?
> >
> >Like, if I go and use the phone in, say, Florida - how does that
> >work? Does unlocking help?
> >
> >Curious -
>
Anonymous
July 15, 2004 8:16:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.rogersatt (More info?)

Hmmm. Interesting.
Last time I did that in Europe was about two years ago.
I was able to do it in China, (Shanghai), last year.
I guess a work around would be to forward your Rogers SIM number to a
local land line, (I use Vonage, a VOIP service), which could then
forward the call anywhere. With a VOIP service you can use the
internet to call forward your phone number. I haven't tried it yet but
that may do the trick.
Of course, if you have high speed service at your destination, you can
just plug in your VOIP box there for toll free service to home.

Anyone else have any ideas?

On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 03:11:45 GMT, "Matthew Hill"
<matthillNOSPAMPLS@shaw.ca> wrote:

>How do you forward your Rogers SIM number to a European SIM number? I have
>been a regular traveller to the UK over the past three years and use a UK
>based pay as you go SIM in my unlocked phone when travelling. When I tried
>to forward my phone I was unable to do so. The forwarding service appears to
>have restrictions on the number of digits. When I called Rogers, they
>indicated they could only forward to a 10 digit (North American) number.
>
>
>"Philip Uglow" <philip@uglow.ca> wrote in message
>news:h5m8f0dmnd6f0kvg4njv9cmh3q84hb4vrg@4ax.com...
>> I found that unlocking my phone was beneficial when I travel to Europe
>> and China. When I am there I can purchase a local SIM card very
>> cheaply and use the phone on the local networks. If you keep your
>> Rogers SIM card in place you would pay a fortune in long distance
>> charges. Before swapping the card I call forward my Canadian Rogers
>> SIM number to my new local foreign number. That way my local contacts
>> can contact me without paying long distance charges.
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, 8 Jul 2004 18:39:15 +0000 (UTC), MooCow <xmoocowx@vceen.bc.ca>
>> wrote:
>>
>> >Hi, gurus:
>> >
>> >I'm a bit confused. Someone at the richmond night market offered to
>> >'unlock' my phone - for $40. soemthing about "so you can use your phone
>> >on other networks."
>> >
>> >but unless I really want to move from Rogers to Fido and keep the same
>> >phone, if not, what other benefits are there to unlocking phones?
>> >
>> >Like, if I go and use the phone in, say, Florida - how does that
>> >work? Does unlocking help?
>> >
>> >Curious -
>>
>
!