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Is this build compatible.

Hi, So I am trying to make a pc for light gaming and school use and would like to know what you think of this configuration. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820144560 GeIL EVO CORSA Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model GOC316GB1600C10DC
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811322054 Sentey Extreme Division GS-6000 II Optimus Black SECC / Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130796 EVGA 02G-P4-2645-KR GeForce GT 640 2GB 128-bit DDR3 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready Video Card with free photoshop 10 elements with evga registration
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182200 Rosewill Green Series RG630-S12 630W Continuous @40°C,80 PLUS Certified, Single 12V Rail, Active PFC "Compatible with Core
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106369 LITE-ON Black 12X Blu-ray Burner with Blu Ray 3D Feature SATA IHBS112-04 - OEM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.1062820 Intel BOXDZ77BH55K LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI, DP, SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard + Intel 9-Panel custom, limited edition Intel Rubik’s cube Free with purchase!
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.1062824 Intel Core i5-3450 Ivy Bridge 3.1GHz (3.5GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 2500 BX80637I53450 + Intel 9-Panel custom, limited edition Intel Rubik’s cube Free with purchase!

I already Have a hard drive with OS installed and a monitor. the total is 780.61 and I want to make sure that all these parts are compatible and are not going to bottle neck each other. And also will the power supply be to much or to little wattage?
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More about build compatible
  1. As i said it is for light gaming and school work. and the budget is 800.
  2. Hi winterneo!
    Replace the mobo and RAM and VGA with these!

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820226221 Mushkin Enhanced Radioactive 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130828 EVGA SuperClocked 01G-P4-2652-KR GeForce GTX 650

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131821R ASUS SABERTOOTH Z77 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
  3. You don't need 16GB of RAM; 8GB is more than enough.
    The intel motherboard is overpriced; you can save $70 by going for a Gigabyte GA-H77-DS3H http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128550

    If you are gaming a more powerful graphics card is a definite must, see if you can fit a 7850 or 7870 into the budget.

    You may also want to have another look at cases; that one has a USB 3.0 passthrough cable to the rear panel which looks kind of ugly; get one with an internal header instead.
  4. No... he doesn't state he intends to overclock and his budget doesn't allow for such a motherboard the sabertooth is more for overclocking and it's looks and 5 year warranty not worth it's price anyways imo and it's overkill for OP needs for ram 8gb is more than enough for your intended uses i would suggest any of these brands as their known to be consistently reliable as is Mushkin,kingston,Corsair and one or two others .RAM:G.SKILL Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231416#top

    RAM:Crucial Ballistix sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model BLS2KIT4G3D1609DS1S00
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820148544#top

    RAM:G.SKILL Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-1600C9D-8GAB
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231546#top
  5. Quote:
    Very good but he said LIGHT GAMING i think a Sabertoosh is an Overkill i mean what is he gonna even do?
    a 650 is good

    BTW OP
    what games do you want to play

    Well I am not sure. I just want the ability to for when I do decide to play games. My goal is to have a pc that will last and not be needing a lot of upgrades. I don't think it would be anything like mass effect or the other games like that.
  6. why don't pay 1$ more dollar for better quallity? + more overclock friendly and durable!;)

    i only chose it because it's better mobo than what he choes @ same $ :)

    of curse there are many budget mobo's with the same functionality! but not the same capability... ;)
  7. The PSU is overkill and not needed it's also known not to be consistently reliable i would suggest Antec Neo Eco 520C
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371030
    Seasonic made. 40 amps 12V power. $55 and 3 yr warranty
  8. armand_h said:
    why don't pay 1$ more dollar for better quallity? + more overclock friendly and durable!;)

    i only chose it because it's better mobo than what he choes @ same $ :)

    of curse there are many budget mobo's with the same functionality! but not the same capability... ;)

    One thing I don't understand is why is the memory you suggested at 8gb total better than the 16Gb I selected for the same price? is the 8GB one better somehow?
  9. armand_h said:
    why don't pay 1$ more dollar for better quallity? + more overclock friendly and durable!;)

    i only chose it because it's better mobo than what he choes @ same $ :)

    of curse there are many budget mobo's with the same functionality! but not the same capability... ;)
    hmmm... sorry i didn't notice it was same price as the motherboard he picked still he picked a locked cpu so what's the point of getting the sabertooth
  10. because of more bandwidth (1333vs1600) and latency (CL10 vs CL7)
    less latency= faster response!
    Plus i recommend psu more than 620W! somthing around 700W!
  11. armand_h said:
    because of more bandwidth (1333vs1600) and latency (CL10 vs CL7)
    less latency= faster response!

    OK so now I got:

    EVGA SuperClocked 01G-P4-2652-KR GeForce GTX 650 1GB 128-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready Video Card

    Antec NEO ECO 520C 520W Continuous Power ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC Power Supply

    Mushkin Enhanced Radioactive 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model 997006

    ASUS SABERTOOTH Z77 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

    LITE-ON Black 12X Blu-ray Burner with Blu Ray 3D Feature SATA IHBS112-04 - OEM

    Intel Core i5-3450 Ivy Bridge 3.1GHz (3.5GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 2500 BX80637I53450

    Did I miss anything or is this good?
  12. armand_h said:
    because of more bandwidth (1333vs1600) and latency (CL10 vs CL7)
    less latency= faster response!
    Plus i recommend psu more than 620W! somthing around 700W!

    and also both memory options the one you provided and min are 1600 the only thing different is the latency.
  13. as i said PSU blow 650W is a little bit risky!
    because it will not run at the same wattage once it was! so if you don't want any trouble buy more powerfull PSU!
    trust me,you won't regret it! ;)
    because i had this problem!
  14. lol , i don't know why but i thought it's 1333mhz!)))
  15. armand_h said:
    as i said PSU blow 650W is a little bit risky!
    because it will not run at the same wattage once it was! so if you don't want any trouble buy more powerfull PSU!
    trust me,you won't regret it! ;)
    because i had this problem!

    sorry I read the other post for the lower wattage. is there one in particular you would recommend?
  16. armand_h said:
    lol , i don't know why but i thought it's 1333mhz!)))

    So would you still recommend the one you said?
  17. yep! same price, better latency!:)
    same thing but lower voltage = lower wattage but it cost 69$
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231536
  18. armand_h said:
    yep! same price, better latency!:)
    same thing but lower voltage = lower wattage but it cost 69$
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231536

    RAIDMAX HYBRID 2 RX-730SS 730W ATX12V V2.2/ EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready Modular Power Supply, New Version with Build-in LED Fan On/Off Switch
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817152036&Tpk=RAIDMAX%20HYBRID%202%20RX-730SS%20730W%20ATX12V%20V2.2%2f%20EPS12V

    Is this one good?
  19. replace the mobo with this! it was second hand i think!))))

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128551
  20. armand_h said:
    replace the mobo with this! it was second hand i think!))))

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128551

    and the power supply? the one i picked doesn't have to good of reviews.
  21. winterneo said:
    RAIDMAX HYBRID 2 RX-730SS 730W ATX12V V2.2/ EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready Modular Power Supply, New Version with Build-in LED Fan On/Off Switch
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817152036&Tpk=RAIDMAX%20HYBRID%202%20RX-730SS%20730W%20ATX12V%20V2.2%2f%20EPS12V

    Is this one good?
    No!And i can see your getting confused i am going to get you proof with links to things so you don't need to listen to what some are claiming let's start with the PSU check it out. http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/permalink/323050/323050/ShowThread.aspx#323050 and recommended PSU thread http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/322966-28-list-recommended-psus#
  22. armand_h said:
    this is a better option

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817171054

    but it's not modular


    ok so

    Sentey Extreme Division GS-6000 II Optimus Black SECC / Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case

    EVGA SuperClocked 01G-P4-2652-KR GeForce GTX 650 1GB 128-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready Video Card

    COOLER MASTER eXtreme Power Plus RS700-PCAAE3-US 700W ATX 12V v2.3 Active PFC Power Supply

    G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model

    GIGABYTE G1.Sniper M3 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard

    LITE-ON Black 12X Blu-ray Burner with Blu Ray 3D Feature SATA IHBS112-04 - OEM

    Intel Core i5-3450 Ivy Bridge 3.1GHz (3.5GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 2500 BX80637I53450

    which goes about $30 over my budget but if this is a good config then that's what I'll do.
  23. armand_h said:
    this is a better option

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817171054

    but it's not modular
    Really please... stop it your not being helpful no offense Tier 4 - Not Recommend for stressful situations. May not be able to put out full rated power above room temperature, and may slightly fail to meet ATX specs. http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/permalink/323050/323050/ShowThread.aspx#323050
  24. bigcyco1 said:
    Really please... stop it your not being helpful no offense Tier 4 - Not Recommend for stressful situations. May not be able to put out full rated power above room temperature, and may slightly fail to meet ATX specs. http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/permalink/323050/323050/ShowThread.aspx#323050

    OK so what would you recommend on newegg.com Is the only thing that needs to be different is the PSU or is it the other stuff also?
  25. everything looks good to me!

    good gaming rig!;)

    play hard, study harder!;)
  26. armand_h said:
    everything looks good to me!

    good gaming rig!;)

    play hard, study harder!;)


    What about what the other person said about the PSU. omg this is getting stressful.
  27. bigcyco1 said:
    Really please... stop it your not being helpful no offense Tier 4 - Not Recommend for stressful situations. May not be able to put out full rated power above room temperature, and may slightly fail to meet ATX specs. http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/permalink/323050/323050/ShowThread.aspx#323050


    so what do you offer to buy @ ~75$??

    raidmax or rosewill or some chinese psu?))

    please share your opinion!:)
  28. winterneo said:
    OK so what would you recommend on newegg.com Is the only thing that needs to be different is the PSU or is it the other stuff also?
    The PSU and why are you buying a overclocking hardcore gaming motherboard and a cpu that can't be overclocked it doesn't make any sense the build is not balanced give me a few minutes i will do a build for you then post another thread asking if it's good if you don't believe me fair enough ?
  29. bigcyco1 said:
    The PSU and why are you buying a overclocking hardcore gaming motherboard and a cpu that can't be overclocked it doesn't make since the build is not balanced give me a few minutes i will do a build for you then post another thread asking if it's good if you don't believe me fair enough ?

    fair enough. keep in mind my $800 budget though.
  30. winterneo said:
    fair enough. keep in mind my $800 budget though.
    o.k. here this video card might be overkill for your uses so you could go cheaper if you want and you can change the case if you don't like it PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3450 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor ($194.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Asus P8H77-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($115.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($41.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($247.86 @ Newegg)
    Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Antec Neo Eco 520W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($46.98 @ Newegg)
    Total: $737.79
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-09-25 07:30 EDT-0400)
  31. Best answer
  32. Best answer selected by winterneo.
  33. Make sure you get a PSU on this list http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/322966-28-list-recommended-psus# or tell me what your going to get and the video card it's not to be taken lightly VERY IMPORTANT!
  34. total is less than 700$ ;)
  35. Im considering the 700 watt one that was recommended by armand_h and same with the graphic card. I still have another 2 weeks to decide though.
  36. Big mistake don't buy that psu i can only help you if you let me Please...before you decide post a thread asking about that PSU
  37. I want to make sure that I have enough power to run everything. Also im confused between the two gpu cards because the one the other person recommeneded is superclocked and cheaper than the one you recommended.
  38. winterneo said:
    I want to make sure that I have enough power to run everything. Also im confused between the two gpu cards because the one the other person recommeneded is superclocked and cheaper than the one you recommended.
    The one i posted is a much better card is why please read this it's Toms Hardware monthly best bang for buck video card recommendations http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CCIQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tomshardware.com%2Freviews%2Fgaming-graphics-card-review%2C3107.html&ei=c6FhUJzUNqmniAL2zICgBw&usg=AFQjCNE6fmDXW494QWfbbJ2CkdLj9IsXDw&sig2=o124W9t5aKagZOlbX8r4XA
  39. bigcyco1 said:

    So your sure the power supply and graphic card will be sufficient? Also will they be able to support the bluray player I have listed. can the GPU support 3d playback?
  40. 7870 is more powerfull than GTX 650! but price is more than twice!
    what is your monitor max res? if it's not 1080p then you dont need that VGA!
    if you want to upgrade it in future then 7870 is good choice!;)
    and this is another option:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121651
  41. Look i just copy and pasted it you need to do research before buying things or you'll regret it Best PCI Express (PCIe) Card For $65:
    Radeon HD 6670 DDR3 (Check Prices)

    Good 1680x1050 performance in most games
    Radeon HD 6670 DDR3
    Codename: Turks
    Process: 40 nm
    Universal Shaders: 480
    Texture Units: 24
    ROPs: 8
    Memory Bus: 128-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 800
    Memory Speed MHz: 800 (1600 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11/SM 5.0
    Max TDP: 66 W

    We're still sad that the Radeon HD 5670 was discontinued. Although it's true that the Radeon HD 6670 DDR3 has a more capable GPU featuring a 25 MHz-faster core clock, four more texture units, and 80 additional shader cores, the 5670 wields more than two times the memory bandwidth thanks to its 1 GHz GDDR5 subsystem.

    Nevertheless, without any significant competition, the Radeon HD 6670 DDR3 assumes our $65 recommendation.
    Best PCIe Card For ~$110:
    Radeon HD 7750 (Check Prices)

    Good 1920x1200 performance in most games, some with lowered detail
    Radeon HD 7750
    Codename: Cape Verde
    Process: 28 nm
    Universal Shaders: 512
    Texture Units: 32
    ROPs: 16
    Memory Bus: 128-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 800
    Memory Speed MHz: 1125 (4500 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11.1/SM 5.0
    Max TDP: 55 W

    The Radeon HD 7750 is the fastest graphics card you can get right now that doesn't require an auxiliary power input; it draws all that it needs from a 16-lane PCIe slot. If you're upgrading an older machine with limited power supply capacity, that's an attractive point to consider.

    And it's a decent performer, too, particularly in light of AMD's most recent Catalyst driver packages, which are out of beta and now final builds available on its Web site.

    Read our full review of AMD's Radeon HD 7750 for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.

    Best PCIe Card For ~$130: Tie
    Radeon HD 7770 (Check Prices)

    Good 1920x1200 performance in most games, some with lowered detail
    Radeon HD 7770
    Codename: Cape Verde
    Process: 28 nm
    Universal Shaders: 640
    Texture Units: 40
    ROPs: 16
    Memory Bus: 128-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 1000
    Memory Speed MHz: 1125 (4500 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11.1/SM 5.0
    Max TDP: 80 W

    The Radeon HD 7770 can now be found for $125, which is significantly lower than the over-ambitious $160 AMD wanted for the card when it launched (it's even more affordable than Nvidia's GeForce GTX 560 SE).

    At least as powerful as the end-of-lifed Radeon HD 6790, this newer card uses only half the power to get its job done. Now that we see a price we like, the 7770 deserves a full recommendation.

    Read our full review of AMD's Radeon HD 7770 for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.
    GeForce GTX 560 SE

    Good 1920x1200 performance in most games, some with lowered detail
    GeForce GTX 560 SE
    Codename: GF114
    Process: 40 nm
    Universal Shaders: 288
    Texture Units: 48
    ROPs: 24
    Memory Bus: 192-bit
    Core/Shader Speed MHz: 776 / 1552
    Memory Speed MHz: 957 (3828 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11/SM 5
    Max TDP: 150 W

    Armed with a crippled version of the GF114 GPU used in Nvidia's GeForce GTX 560 and GTX 560 Ti, the 560 SE delivers performance similar to the company's now-defunct GeForce GTX 460 192-bit card at a lower price point. It also stands up against AMD's similarly-priced Radeon HD 7770, though the AMD board's power consumption is much more conservative. This card is getting harder to find, and we expect it to be displaced by new Kepler-based options in the near future.
    Best PCIe Card For $150:
    Radeon HD 6850 (Check Prices)

    Good 1920x1200 performance in most games
    Radeon HD 6850
    Codename: RV970 "Barts"
    Process: 40 nm
    Universal Shaders: 960
    Texture Units: 48
    ROPs: 32
    Memory Bus: 256-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 775
    Memory Speed MHz: 1000 (4000 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11/SM 5.0
    Max TDP: 127 W

    AMD's Radeon HD 6850 proved to be a worthy adversary against the 256-bit GeForce GTX 460. Unfortunately, those competing boards from Nvidia were phased out not too long ago, leaving AMD's offering as our sole recommendation at this price point. It seems that the Radeon HD 6850 is also being end-of-lifed, based on the low stock we've seen recently.

    Read our full review of AMD's Radeon HD 6850 for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.

    Best PCIe Card For ~$170: Tie
    Radeon HD 6870 (Check Prices)

    Great 1920x1200 performance in most games
    Radeon HD 6870
    Codename: RV970 "Barts"
    Process: 40 nm
    Universal Shaders: 1120
    Texture Units: 56
    ROPs: 32
    Memory Bus: 256-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 900
    Memory Speed MHz: 1050 (4200 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11/SM 5.0
    Max TDP: 151 W

    At a price comparable to Nvidia's GeForce GTX 560, the Radeon HD 6870 also manages to offer compelling performance. Although this card is based on AMD's older VLIW5 architecture and uses more power at idle than the GeForce GTX 560, it's the more energy-friendly option in a taxing first-person shooter.

    Read our full review of AMD's Radeon HD 6870 for more information on this card and its accompanying architecture.
    GeForce GTX 560 (Check Prices)

    Great 1920x1200 performance in most games
    GeForce GTX 560
    Codename: GF114
    Process: 40 nm
    Universal Shaders: 336
    Texture Units: 56
    ROPs: 32
    Memory Bus: 256-bit
    Core/Shader Speed MHz: 810 / 1620
    Memory Speed MHz: 1002 (4008 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11/SM 5
    Max TDP: 160 W

    The GeForce GTX 560 is essentially a highly overclocked GeForce GTX 460, and it competes with the Radeon HD 6870. Both options introduce impressive game performance that we simply haven't seen before under the $200 price point.

    Read our full review of Nvidia's GeForce GTX 560 for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.
    Best PCIe Card For ~$210:
    Radeon HD 7850 (Check Prices)

    Excellent 1920x1200 performance, Good 2560x1600 performance in most games with lowered detail
    Radeon HD 7850
    Codename: Pitcairn
    Process: 28 nm
    Universal Shaders: 1024
    Texture Units: 64
    ROPs: 32
    Memory Bus: 256-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 860
    Memory Speed MHz: 1200 (4800 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11.1/SM 5
    Max TDP: 130 W

    AMD's Radeon HD 7850 offers performance similar to the GeForce GTX 560 Ti 448-core and GeForce GTX 570, but at a lower $210 price point.

    Moreover, the Radeon HD 7850 does its job using about half of the power as both older boards based on 40 nm Fermi GPUs.

    Read our full review of AMD's Radeon HD 7800 series for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.

    Best PCIe Card For ~$260:
    Radeon HD 7870 (Check Prices)

    Excellent 1920x1200 performance, Good 2560x1600 performance in most games with lowered detail
    Radeon HD 7870
    Codename: Pitcairn
    Process: 28 nm
    Universal Shaders: 1280
    Texture Units: 80
    ROPs: 32
    Memory Bus: 256-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 1000
    Memory Speed MHz: 1200 (4800 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11.1/SM 5
    Max TDP: 175 W

    The Radeon HD 7870 sets a new standard for what we expect from a sub-$300 GPU. With performance comparable to the GeForce GTX 580 and kissing the heels of AMD's own Radeon HD 7950, this card represents one of the best enthusiast-oriented values we've seen in recent memory.

    Read our full review of AMD's Radeon HD 7800 series for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.
    Honorable Mention:
    2 x Radeon HD 6850 in CrossFire (Check Prices)

    Exceptional 1920x1200 performance, Good 2560x1600 performance
    2 x Radeon HD 6850 in CrossFire
    Codename: RV970 "Barts"
    Process: 40 nm
    Universal Shaders: 1920 (2 x 960)
    Texture Units: 96 (2 x 48)
    ROPs: 64 (2 x 32)
    Memory Bus: 256-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 775
    Memory Speed MHz: 1000 (4000 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11/SM 5.0
    Max TDP: 254 W (2 x 127 W)

    We already know that two Radeon HD 6850s in CrossFire are fast. However, based on our exploration of micro-stuttering, there's a fair chance that enthusiasts sensitive to this phenomenon might not be satisfied with the way a pair of these cards behave. If you already know this doesn't affect you, then you're in the clear.

    Read our full review of AMD's Radeon HD 6850 for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.
    Best PCIe Card For ~$330:
    Radeon HD 7950 (Check Prices)

    Exceptional 1920x1200 performance, Good 2560x1600 performance
    Radeon HD 7950
    Codename: Tahiti
    Process: 28 nm
    Universal Shaders: 1792
    Texture Units: 112
    ROPs: 32
    Memory Bus: 384-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 800
    Memory Speed MHz: 1250 (5000 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11.1/SM 5
    Max TDP: 200 W

    Upon its release, AMD's Radeon HD 7950 was overpriced compared to the Radeon HD 7970, and it performed too much like the less-expensive Radeon HD 7870. After a sequence of much-needed price cuts, though, this card is a much more interesting option at $330.

    Keep an eye out for the Boost Edition cards, which include a different BIOS with a higher base clock, a boosted operating state, and higher power consumption. Or, if you grab a reference-class 7950, you should have the opportunity to flash a Boost Edition firmware to it yourself.

    Read our full review of AMD's Radeon HD 7950 for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.
    Honorable Mention:
    2 x Radeon HD 6870 in CrossFire (Check Prices)

    Exceptional 1920x1200 performance, Great 2560x1600 performance
    2 x Radeon HD 6870 in CrossFire
    Codename: RV970 "Barts"
    Process: 40 nm
    Universal Shaders: 2240 (2 x 1120)
    Texture Units: 112 (2 x 56)
    ROPs: 64 (2 x 32)
    Memory Bus: 256-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 900
    Memory Speed MHz: 1100 (4200 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11/SM 5.0
    Max TDP: 302 W (2 x 151 W)

    Two Radeon HD 6870 cards in CrossFire and two GeForce GTX 560 cards in SLI are very powerful, capable combinations. Just keep in mind that, if you plan to employ resolutions above 1920x1080 with anti-aliasing enabled, you should consider boards with more than 1 GB of RAM.

    Bear in mind, though, that this isn't a full recommendation, either. The Radeon HD 6870s remain honorable mentions in light of the findings in Micro-Stuttering And GPU Scaling In CrossFire And SLI.

    Read our full review of AMD's Radeon HD 6870 for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.
    Honorable Mention:
    2x GeForce GTX 560 in SLI (Check Prices)

    Exceptional 1920x1200 performance, Great 2560x1600 performance
    2x GeForce GTX 560 in SLI
    Codename: GF114
    Process: 40 nm
    Universal Shaders: 672 (2 x 336)
    Texture Units: 112 (2 x 56)
    ROPs: 64 (2 x 32)
    Memory Bus: 256-bit
    Core/Shader Speed MHz: 810 / 1620
    Memory Speed MHz: 1002 (4008 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11/SM 5
    Max TDP: 320 W (2 x 160 W)

    The GeForce GTX 560 is essentially a highly overclocked GeForce GTX 460, and two in SLI provide good competition for a dual Radeon HD 6870 CrossFire setup.

    Read our full review of Nvidia's GeForce GTX 560 for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.

    Best PCIe Card For ~$380:
    GeForce GTX 670 (Check Prices)

    Great 2560x1600 performance
    GeForce GTX 670
    Codename: GK104
    Process: 28 nm
    Universal Shaders: 1344
    Texture Units: 112
    ROPs: 32
    Memory Bus: 256-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 915
    Memory Speed MHz: 1502 (6006 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11/SM 5
    Max TDP:
    170 W

    The GeForce GTX 670 serves up performance somewhere between the Radeon HD 7950 and 7970 for around $380. That's an impressive feat considering that AMD's flagship was selling for $550 a couple of months ago. Moreover, we've seen Nvidia's second-fastest single-GPU board in stock and available for purchase ever since it was introduced. That's something AMD cannot claim.

    Read our full review of Nvidia's GeForce GTX 670 for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.
    Best PCIe Card For ~$430:

    Radeon HD 7970 (Check Prices)

    Great 2560x1600 performance
    Radeon HD 7970
    Codename: Tahiti
    Process: 28 nm
    Universal Shaders: 2048
    Texture Units: 128
    ROPs: 32
    Memory Bus: 384-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 925
    Memory Speed MHz: 1375 (5500 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11.1/SM 5
    Max TDP:
    250 W

    AMD's recent driver improvements had a big impact on performance, helping make a case for a price premium over Nvidia's GeForce GTX 670. As it settles in around $430, we think the vanilla Radeon HD 7970 deserves some love.

    Now, you might be able to find a Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition card on sale for something similar. If so, we'd recommend grabbing it. But where most of the GHz Edition cards are sitting (up closer to $470), we'd recommend skipping those boards. The reference model is already pretty overclockable, meaning you can coax much of that performance out of the cheaper card anyway.

    We also don't think paying $500 or more for a GeForce GTX 680 makes much sense. As a result, the Radeon HD 7970 finally earns a place on our list.

    Read our full preview of AMD's Radeon HD 7970 for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.
    Honorable Mentions over $400:
    Assorted Multi-Card Configurations

    The GTX 670 delivers such impressive performance under $400 that we find it hard to recommend higher-performing (but sometimes-inconsistent) multi-card configurations for more money. We'll call out some of the most promising options, though, especially for folks with one of these cards already installed: two Radeon HD 7850s in CrossFire for $410, two Radeon HD 7870s in CrossFire for $520, and finally, two GeForce GTX 670s in SLI for $760.
    Best PCIe Card For ~$1050:
    GeForce GTX 690

    Excellent 2560x1600 performance
    GeForce GTX 690
    Codename: 2 x GK104
    Process: 28 nm
    Universal Shaders: 3072 (2 x 1536)
    Texture Units: 256 (2 x 128)
    ROPs: 64 (2 x 32)
    Memory Bus: 256-bit
    Core Speed MHz: 915
    Memory Speed MHz: 1502 (6008 effective)
    DirectX/Shader Model: DX 11/SM 5
    Max TDP:
    300 W

    Nvidia's GeForce GTX 690 is the fastest graphics card in the world. It's essentially two GeForce GTX 680 cards on a single PCB, with a slightly lower core clock and a 300 W TDP. The company sets this card's MSRP right around $1000, which is two times higher than a single GeForce GTX 680. That's not a bad deal if you were planning to go with a pair of GTX 680s in SLI anyway.

    The 690's availability has improved since last month, and the card can now be found for $1050 without too much trouble.

    Read our full review of Nvidia's GeForce GTX 690 for more information on the card and its accompanying architecture.
    What about this other card that’s not on the list? How do I know if it’s a good deal or not?

    This will happen. In fact, it’s guaranteed to happen, because inventory levels and prices change quickly. So how do you know if that card you’ve got your eye on is a good buy in its price range?

    Here is a resource to help you judge if a card is a good buy or not. The graphics card hierarchy chart groups graphics cards with similar overall performance levels into tiers. The top tier contains the highest-performing cards available and performance decreases as you go down the tiers from there.

    You can use this hierarchy to compare the pricing between two cards, to see which one is a better deal, and also to determine if an upgrade is worthwhile. I don’t recommend upgrading your graphics card unless the replacement card is at least three tiers higher. Otherwise, the upgrade is somewhat parallel and you may not notice a worthwhile difference in performance.

    At the request of readers, I have added mobile graphics and integrated chipsets to the hierarchy chart. I want to make it clear that there is very little performance data available for these graphics solutions. While the discrete video cards in the chart are placed in tiers based on a lot of information, many of the mobile and integrated devices in the chart are guesstimates based on their specifications. At worst, I don’t think they’re more than one tier away from their actual performance, but this is something to keep in mind when considering mobile graphics chipsets.
    Graphics Card Hierarchy Chart
    GeForce Radeon Intel
    Discrete: GTX 690


    Discrete: GTX 590, GTX 680 Discrete: HD 6990, HD 7970 GHz Ed.

    Discrete: GTX 670
    Discrete: HD 7970
    Discrete: GTX 580, 660 Ti
    Discrete: HD 5970, HD 7870, HD 7950

    Discrete: GTX 295, GTX 480, GTX 570
    Go (mobile): 680M
    Discrete: HD 4870 X2, HD 6970, HD 7850
    Mobility: 7970M

    Discrete: GTX 470, GTX 560 Ti, GTX 560 Ti 448 Core Discrete: HD 4850 X2, HD 5870, HD 6950
    Mobility: 7950M

    Discrete: GTX 560
    Go (mobile): 580M
    Discrete: HD 5850, HD 6870
    Mobility: 6990M

    Discrete: 9800 GX2, GTX 285, GTX 460 256-bit, GTX 465
    Go (mobile): 675M
    Discrete: HD 6850
    Mobility: 6900M

    Discrete: GTX 260, GTX 275, GTX 280, GTX 460 192-bit, GTX 460 SE, GTX 550 Ti, GTX 560 SE
    Go (mobile): 570M, 670M
    Discrete: HD 4870, HD 5770, HD 4890, HD 5830, HD 6770, HD 6790, HD 7770
    Mobility: HD 5870, 6800M

    Discrete: 8800 Ultra, 9800 GTX, 9800 GTX+, GTS 250, GTS 450
    Go (mobile): 560M, 660M
    Discrete: HD 3870 X2, HD 4850, HD 5750, HD 6750, HD 7750
    Mobility: HD 4850, HD 5850, 7870M

    Discrete: 8800 GTX, 8800 GTS 512 MB, GT 545 (GDDR5)
    Go (mobile): GTX 280M, GTX 285M, 555M (GDDR5)
    Discrete: HD 4770
    Mobility: HD 4860, 7770M, 7850M

    Discrete: 8800 GT 512 MB, 9800 GT, GT 545 (DDR3), GT 640 (DDR3)
    Go (mobile): 9800M GTX, GTX 260M (112), GTS 360M (GDDR5), 555M (DDR3)
    Discrete: HD 4830, HD 5670, HD 6670 (GDDR5)
    Mobility: HD 5770, HD 5750, 6600M/6700M (GDDR5), 7750M

    Discrete: 8800 GTS 640 MB, 9600 GT, GT 240 (GDDR5)
    Go (mobile): 9800M GTS, GTX 160M
    Discrete: HD 2900 XT, HD 3870, HD 5570 (GDDR5), HD 6570 (GDDR5)
    Mobility: 6500M (GDDR5), 6600M/6700M (DDR3), 7730M

    Discrete: 8800 GS, 9600 GSO, GT 240 (DDR3)
    Go (mobile): GTX 260M (96), GTS 150M, GTS 360M (DDR3)
    Discrete: HD 3850 512 MB, HD 4670, HD 5570 (DDR3), HD 6570 (DDR3), HD 6670 (DDR3)
    Mobility: HD 3870, HD 5730, HD 5650, 6500M (DDR3)

    Discrete: 8800 GT 256 MB, 8800 GTS 320 MB, GT 440 GDDR5
    Go (mobile): 8800M Discrete: HD 2900 PRO, HD 3850 256 MB, 5550 (GDDR5)
    Mobility: HD 3850
    Discrete: 7950 GX2, GT 440 DDR3
    Discrete: X1950 XTX, HD 4650 (DDR3), 5550 (DDR3)
    Discrete: 7800 GTX 512, 7900 GTO, 7900 GTX, GT 430, GT 530
    Go (mobile): 550M
    Discrete: X1900 XT, X1950 XT, X1900 XTX
    Discrete: 7800 GTX, 7900 GT, 7950 G, GT 220 (DDR3)
    Go (mobile): 525M, 540M
    Discrete: X1800 XT, X1900 AIW, X1900 GT, X1950 PRO, HD 2900 GT, HD 5550 (DDR2)

    Discrete: 7800 GT, 7900 GS, 8600 GTS, 9500 GT (GDDR3), GT 220 (DDR2)
    Go (mobile): 7950 GTX
    Discrete: X1800 XL, X1950 GT, HD 4650 (DDR2), HD 6450
    Mobility: X1800 XT, HD 4650, HD 5165, 6400M
    Integrated: 6620G, 6550D

    Discrete: 6800 Ultra, 7600 GT, 7800 GS, 8600 GS, 8600 GT (GDDR3), 9500 GT (DDR2)
    Go (mobile): 7800 GTX, 7900 GTX Discrete: X800 XT (& PE), X850 XT (& PE), X1650 XT, X1800 GTO, HD 2600 XT, HD 3650 (DDR3), HD 3670
    Mobility: X1900, 3670
    Integrated: 6520G, 6530D
    Integrated: Intel HD Graphics 4000
    Discrete: 6800 GT, 6800 GS (PCIe), 8600 GT (DDR2), GT 520
    Go (mobile): 7800, Go 7900 GS, 520M, 520MX
    Discrete: X800 XL, X800 GTO2/GTO16, HD 2600 PRO, HD 3650 (DDR2),
    Mobility: X800 XT, HD 2600 XT, 3650
    Integrated: 6410D, 6480G

    Discrete: 6800 GS (AGP)
    Go (mobile): 6800 Ultra, 7600 GT, 8600M GT, 8700M GT, 410M Discrete: X800 GTO 256 MB, X800 PRO, X850 PRO, X1650 GT
    Mobility: HD 2600
    Integrated: 6370D, 6380G

    Discrete: 6800, 7300 GT GDDR3, 7600 GS, 8600M GS
    Go (mobile): 6800, 7700
    Discrete: X800, X800 GTO 128 MB, X1600 XT, X1650 PRO
    Mobility: X1800, HD 5145, HD 5470 (GDDR5), HD 5450,
    Discrete: 6600 GT, 6800LE, 6800 XT, 7300 GT (DDR2), 8500 GT, 9400 GT
    Go (mobile): 7600 (128-bit)
    Discrete: 9800 XT, X700 PRO, X800 GT, X800 SE, X1300 XT, X1600 PRO, HD 2400 XT, HD 4350, HD 4550, HD 5450
    Mobility: X800, 3470, HD 5470 (DDR3), HD 5430, 6300M
    Integrated: HD 6310, HD 6320
    Integrated: Intel HD Graphics 3000
    Discrete: FX 5900, FX 5900 Ultra, FX 5950 Ultra, 6600 (128-bit)
    Go (mobile): 6800 (128-bit)
    Integrated: 9300, 9400 Discrete: 9700, 9700 PRO, 9800, 9800 PRO, X700, X1300 PRO, X1550, HD 2400 PRO
    Mobility: X1450, X1600, X1700, 2400 XT, X2500, 3450
    Integrated: HD 3200, HD 3300, HD 4200, HD 4250, HD 4290, HD 6250, HD 6290
    Discrete: FX 5800 Ultra, FX 5900 XT
    Go (mobile): 6600, Go 7600 (64-bit)
    Discrete: 9500 PRO, 9600 XT, 9800 PRO (128-bit), X600 XT, X1050 (128-bit)
    Mobility: 9800, X700, X1350, X1400, X2300, HD 2400 Integrated: Intel HD Graphics (Core i5-6x1), 2000
    Discrete: 4 Ti 4600, 4 Ti 4800, FX 5700 Ultra, 6200, 8300, 8400 G, G 210, G 310
    Go (mobile): 315M
    Discrete: 9600 PRO, 9800 LE, X600 PRO, HD 2300
    Mobility: 9700 (128-bit), X600, X1300
    Integrated: Xpress 1250 Integrated: Intel HD Graphics (Core i3 5x0, Core i5-6x0)
    Discrete: 4 Ti4200, 4 Ti4400, 4 Ti4800 SE, FX 5600 Ultra, FX 5700, 6600 (64-bit), 7300 GS, 8400M GS, 9300M G, 9300M GS Discrete: 9500, 9550, 9600, X300, X1050 (64-bit)
    Mobility: 9600
    Integrated: Intel HD Graphics (Pentium G)
    Discrete: 3 Ti500, FX 5200 Ultra, FX 5600, FX 5700 LE, 6200 TC, 6600 LE, 7200 GS, 7300 LE
    Go (mobile): 5700, 8200M, 9200M GS, 9100
    Integrated: 8200, 8300
    Discrete: 8500, 9100, 9000 PRO, 9600 LE, X300 SE, X1150
    Mobility 9700 (64-bit) Integrated: GMA X4500
    Discrete: 3, 3 Ti200, FX 5200 (128-bit), FX 5500,
    Go (mobile): 5600, 6200, 6400, 7200, 7300, 7400 (64-bit) Discrete: 9000, 9200, 9250
    Mobility: 9600 (64-bit), X300
    Discrete: FX 5200 (64 bit)
    Go (mobile): 7200, 7400 (32-bit)
    Integrated: 6100, 6150, 7025, 7050
    Discrete: 9200 SE
    Integrated: Xpress 200M, Xpress 1000, Xpress 1150 Integrated: GMA X3000, X3100, X3500
    Discrete: 2 GTS, 4 MX 440, 2 Ultra, 2 Ti, 2 Ti 200 Discrete: 7500 Integrated: GMA 3000, 3100
    Discrete: 256, 2 MX 200, 4 MX 420, 2 MX 400 Discrete: SDR, LE, DDR, 7000, 7200 Integrated: GMA 500, 900, 950
    Discrete: Nvidia TNT Discrete: Rage 128 Discrete: Intel 740
    Summary

    There you have it folks; the best cards for the money this month. Now all that’s left to do is to find and purchase them.

    Don’t worry too much about which brand you choose, because all of the cards out there are close to Nvidia’s and ATI’s reference designs. Just pay attention to price, warranty, and the manufacturer’s reputation for honoring the warranty if something goes wrong.

    Also remember that the stores don’t follow this list. Things will change over the course of the month and you’ll probably have to adapt your buying strategy to deal with fluctuating prices. Good luck!
  42. 720p but I want to upgrade soon.
  43. Ok I only read like the first 3 lines of that. :sleep: I just need someone to tell me what to buy, and I don't care about every little detail. I need something with 3d playback capabilities.
  44. i can verify bigcyco1's post. you definitly dont need 600+ watts for a single GPU system. armand_h is giving you bad advice.

    of course GPUs support 3d playback or blu-rays
  45. TheBigTroll said:
    i can verify bigcyco1's post. you definitly dont need 600+ watts for a single GPU system. armand_h is giving you bad advice.

    of course GPUs support 3d playback or blu-rays

    Well is the
    ASUS HD7850-DC2-2GD5-V2 Radeon HD 7850 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card
    good for my system because I like the price tag and it seems to be the same as the other one recommended.
  46. winterneo said:
    So your sure the power supply and graphic card will be sufficient? Also will they be able to support the bluray player I have listed. can the GPU support 3d playback?
    What video card are you getting i half to know in order to tell you the right Power supply
  47. winterneo said:
    Well is the
    ASUS HD7850-DC2-2GD5-V2 Radeon HD 7850 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card
    good for my system because I like the price tag and it seems to be the same as the other one recommended.
    It's not as good but yes it's a good card ;)
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