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Computer won't start

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February 10, 2013 9:57:51 AM

Hi, I just got my power supply and memory back from an RMA due to a bad ticking noise and BSOD caused by bad memory. During that time the computer was actually working and wouldn't have problems booting or anything. When i got my PSU and RAM back recently however, the computer wouldn't start at ALL. When i hook up the motherboard to the PSU, the power button on the motherboard goes green, but when i press it, the fans do a half spin then stops and nothing starts at all. When i press the power button on the motherboard again, absolutely nothing happens at all. So here is what i tried to do.
1) tested psu and it works just fine (paperclip test)
2) took out the entire motherboard and left only the psu, cpu, and ram connected to it.
3) checked the pins on the motherboard and reseated cpu multiple times.
none of the above worked. I'm just trying to find out what exactly failed and why. I will RMA the motherboard and cpu, but i just want to see if I could figure out what exactly happened. Everything was working just fine before i sent in the ram and psu for an rma so this is very surprising and confusing. Please give me some advise on what i should do next.

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February 10, 2013 10:11:58 AM

I had the same problem and I noticed the 24-pin ATX connector wasn't 100% plugged lthough it looked like it wa fine... It was sticking out on the bottom side like 1 mm.. So check it very well AND dn't forget to check the 2-pin Power connector from case to mobo.

You can find that connector usually on the bottomside of the Mobo

If hoes ar not the case, then RMA it again...
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February 10, 2013 10:34:43 AM

Already made sure of that multiple times. I don't even have to check the 2 pin power connector since i took it out of the case to make sure its not that. Plus i'm using the power button on the motherboard itself like i've mentioned.
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February 10, 2013 11:03:22 AM

sherifsaid123 said:
Already made sure of that multiple times. I don't even have to check the 2 pin power connector since i took it out of the case to make sure its not that. Plus i'm using the power button on the motherboard itself like i've mentioned.


You have to make sure the power button is connected to the mobo 0.o

Edit: Oops nevermind I read that wrong..
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February 10, 2013 11:32:11 AM

Yeah, i eliminated that possibility all together by taking the motherboard out the case and using the power button on the motherboard itself.
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February 10, 2013 11:38:28 AM

Do you have a multimeter you could check the Rail volts from the PSU? Also if you have more than one stick of RAM try them one at a time and in different slots...
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February 10, 2013 11:50:01 AM

Do not own a multimeter, but i have tried the paperclip test and the fan was spinning. I do have 2 sticks and I tried them both in different slots.
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February 10, 2013 12:16:22 PM

sherifsaid123 said:
Do not own a multimeter, but i have tried the paperclip test and the fan was spinning. I do have 2 sticks and I tried them both in different slots.

Pity, could have isolated the PSU from the equation. However, it sounds like there's a short on the mobo somewhere which appears when you power on, defective capacitor perhaps. (Check to see if any look bad, bulges etc.) Unlikely it's the CPU as they are pretty bomb-proof as long as they're adequately cooled. Meanwhile it's just possible you received a bad PSU, but a meter is the only way to check if it's performing without a load. Meter still cheapest next move...and as you say, the rig was running before you got the new PSU...
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February 10, 2013 1:16:51 PM

I'm getting new computer parts tomorrow including a motherboard and a cpu. Do you guys think its a good idea to try this PSU on it at all? because idk if it could harm the new parts or not. Afterall, i did the paperclip test and the fan worked fine on the psu. What do you guys think?
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February 10, 2013 1:21:45 PM

Ps i checked all the capacitors on the mobo and they all look fine. I even looked at the whole motherboard through each part of it with a magnifying glass and couldnt find even a scratch
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February 10, 2013 1:50:40 PM

sherifsaid123 said:
I'm getting new computer parts tomorrow including a motherboard and a cpu. Do you guys think its a good idea to try this PSU on it at all? because idk if it could harm the new parts or not. Afterall, i did the paperclip test and the fan worked fine on the psu. What do you guys think?

Can't imagine a new PSU would harm anything. What manufacture is it? A cheap meter would verify correct output...
http://hardwarelogic.com/articles.php?id=5075
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February 10, 2013 2:18:22 PM

sherifsaid123 said:
Corsair tx850 v2

Good choice, fitted one recently, very reliable, highly unlikely to be the cause of your probs, but you never quite know!
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February 10, 2013 2:38:04 PM

Never quite knowing is the problem. I just keep running into the lamest and hardest problems to solve when it comes to this computer. PSU ticking noises, ram failing memtest, bsod, cpu stuck sensors, weird performance issues, and now the damn thing wouldn't even start. I really hope the new computer coming in tomorrow doesn't give me problems too or i'm done with building computers for good. I spent an excessive amount of money just to keep a working computer and i'm tired of getting explainable problems. Now that i'm done with my raging, i just wanted to thank you guys for trying to help. I appreciate it.
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February 10, 2013 2:48:44 PM

Hope next one works out well. What mobo are you replacing? (So's I can avoid it...)
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February 13, 2013 5:24:44 PM

Just FYI my new parts are showing the same exact symptoms as the older one using the same ram and psu.
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February 13, 2013 8:42:33 PM

Hmmm. PSU? Multimeter would prove one way or another..
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February 17, 2013 6:15:13 AM

Hope you've resolved your issue by now, post the result, always useful for future reference. Pity your 1st build proved so problematic , hope it doesn't put you off, its usually a highly satisfying experience. Guess you must have purchased a bum component? Does happen. I'll be really surprised if it was the PSU tho.
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February 17, 2013 7:04:03 AM

The hardwarelogic page is incomplete. It lists only the three main PSU outputs.

From my own "how to ..." article

Quote:

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.




Work systematically through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.
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February 17, 2013 9:32:19 AM

i sent my computers to corsair after i filled out a damage claim form with them because of their psu?. why would you not think that it was the psu all along? the first computer was functional until i got that psu and the new one is well...new yet both of them showed the same symptoms with the same ram and psu.
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February 17, 2013 9:34:23 AM

i sent my computers to corsair after i filled out a damage claim form with them because of their psu. why would you not think that it was the psu all along? the first computer was functional until i got that psu and the new one... is well...new yet both of them showed the same symptoms with the same ram and psu. So I had a perfectly functional computer, and a brand new computer, but not neither of them work after i used that psu that i got back from the rma. Coincidence? i think not.
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February 17, 2013 10:11:53 AM

sherifsaid123 said:
i sent my computers to corsair after i filled out a damage claim form with them because of their psu. why would you not think that it was the psu all along? the first computer was functional until i got that psu and the new one is well...new yet both of them showed the same symptoms with the same ram and psu.

I did think it was the PSU initially, hence the request to check with a meter, but must confess I'm surprised that a Corsair would be defective, they have a good reputation.

"Pity, could have isolated the PSU from the equation. However, it sounds like there's a short on the mobo somewhere which appears when you power on, defective capacitor perhaps. (Check to see if any look bad, bulges etc.) Unlikely it's the CPU as they are pretty bomb-proof as long as they're adequately cooled. MEANWHLE JUST POSSIBLE YOU RECIEVED A BAD PSU, but a meter is the only way to check if it's performing without a load. Meter still cheapest next move...and as you say, the rig was running before you got the new PSU..."
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February 17, 2013 10:40:58 AM

Trust me, i'm not the only one having trouble with corsair products. My previous PSU from corsair that I RMAed was defective for sure since they actually told me that it was after i sent it in. Doesn't surprise me one bit if the replacement is defective too.
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