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Is there any reason why I should NOT get an HDTV for my monitor?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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August 7, 2012 3:06:59 PM

I would like having the tv antenna inside my monitor and not taking up space inside my computer, it also costs less than a monitor of similiar size and then a tv antenna.
as far as i know if has the same refresh rate and dimensions... am i missing something?

More about : reason hdtv monitor

a b C Monitor
August 7, 2012 3:11:09 PM

Plenty go that route, just be sure your graphics card will connect and you sit far enough away to enjoy the screen.
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August 7, 2012 3:16:55 PM

An HDTV will cost more than a monitor
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August 7, 2012 3:20:05 PM

I'm looking at a Visio as I write. Be sure to get a 1080p, however as noted the bigger the screen the farther away you need to be to get any benefit.
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a b C Monitor
August 7, 2012 3:21:38 PM

HDTVs tend to be best viewed from a distance of at least 3 to 6 feet if not more
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August 7, 2012 3:37:36 PM

Smaller TV's may not be such a good idea (as in a TV the size of a monitor, sitting on your desk). TV's usually aren't as sharp for rendering static images and text because they don't need to be, and so if you are sitting close to it, it may not be as good as a monitor. However if you're looking at a >30" screen and will be sitting further back, it will be fine.
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August 7, 2012 3:39:14 PM

You can play at 1080p. I use a 46 inch for my monitor Primal i love it. The only downfall i have found is that text is fairly difficult to read but with time Ive grown used to it. People also say there is a delay in the games. If there is i don't notice it. I play a few first person shooters and play just as well if not better on my tv then on my 22" monitor.

Wireless keyboard, Wireless mouse and a nice Recliner ;)  all you need.
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a b C Monitor
August 7, 2012 3:48:33 PM

An advantage to using a monitor and a TV tuner is that you can use your PC like a DVR, I don't think there is a way to do this without an internal TV tuner or some sort of additional external device.
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August 7, 2012 3:48:44 PM

So narrowing it down a little bit more, there isn't too much of the text problems on a smaller tv (21.5-24 inches) correct?
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August 7, 2012 3:58:05 PM

Primal said:
So narrowing it down a little bit more, there isn't too much of the text problems on a smaller tv (21.5-24 inches) correct?


Nope it would be much more legible. The main issue with a "big" tv is your sitting farther away. 8-12 feet. And the text is much smaller at that distance. Sitting close to a smaller tv using like you would a normal computer monitor i don't see any issues at all. Borrow a tv and try it out :)  can't say Ive used anything smaller then 40" so nothing to compare to.
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August 7, 2012 4:08:59 PM

dot pitch sucks on any TV in comparison to monitors. That is why you need to be farther away to get good image otherwise you will see every pixel on a TV. If you want to watch TV go ahead and buy TV...if you more of a PC guy and wants better quality picture buy a monitor.
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August 7, 2012 4:19:29 PM

maxinexus said:
dot pitch sucks on any TV in comparison to monitors. That is why you need to be farther away to get good image otherwise you will see every pixel on a TV. If you want to watch TV go ahead and buy TV...if you more of a PC guy and wants better quality picture buy a monitor.



A lot of that has to do with the size of the screen as well. For instance... a 25" monitor your viewing distance should be roughly 5 feet. Which i don't think is unreasonable for that size of screen. You will only see imperfections if you get to close to the screen so it really just comes down to a matter of preference for the user. Heres a chart to understand what im talking about http://hd.engadget.com/2006/12/09/1080p-charted-viewing... Shows the viewing distance in comparison with resolution and screen size.
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August 7, 2012 4:29:35 PM

You'll definitely want to read reviews on a TV by people specifically using it for gaming, and see what the input lag is. That's something that often gets overlooked when buying a TV, since it's never on any store's spec sheet.
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August 7, 2012 4:51:10 PM

mace200200 said:
An HDTV will cost more than a monitor



I think you have this backwards.

A 32" TV can be had for about $200 where as the closest monitor, 30" can be had for about $1175.

Monitors have always been more expensive then TV's.

TV's are limited to the set resolution 720p or 1080p and specs. Monitors can go much higher and have much better specs in general which is why they are currently and always have been more expensive.

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August 7, 2012 5:00:36 PM

The chart is for TV not monitors. The recommended viewing distance for any monitor is 20-40 inches. Monitor and TV viewing distance is different because of the dot pitch. Average monitors have 0.26mm dp and avarage TV has 0.36mm dp. That is why TVs are so grainy from upclose. I'm running 30" monitor and it is 34 inches away from my eyes...and you can not see any pixels. The image is crystal clear and font is sharp. Try that with a 30" TV...Good luck.

unoriginal1 said:
A lot of that has to do with the size of the screen as well. For instance... a 25" monitor your viewing distance should be roughly 5 feet. Which i don't think is unreasonable for that size of screen. You will only see imperfections if you get to close to the screen so it really just comes down to a matter of preference for the user. Heres a chart to understand what im talking about http://hd.engadget.com/2006/12/09/1080p-charted-viewing... Shows the viewing distance in comparison with resolution and screen size.

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Best solution

a b C Monitor
August 7, 2012 5:09:29 PM

Current config:
.. 32 In Samsung LED HDTV w/the following inputs:
.... Two computers. One connected to HDMI input and the 2nd connected to Computer input.
.... Samsung DVD-DL recorder. My Cable input is connected (so Not using TV input on TV. Do this so that I can set the DVD recorder to record TV shows for watiing later.
For Blueray playback I use the Computer internal Blu-ray Recorder (on in each computer).

As other have stated some text Is NOT the best. Not a gamer, But I understand that pixel on/off time can be a factor and will cause blurr on FAST action scenes, Normally not a problem on Blue-ray blayback (excpt on a FAST motion scene).

Other Monitor/HDTVs I've used.
.. The Best was a Samsung Monitor HD240. At the time it was rather expensive. 24 Inch with 1920 x 1200 resolution. NOTE this is a 16::10 NOT the cheaper 16:9 Monitor.
.. The Samsung P2770 HD a 27 inch Monitor/HDTV (16::9) 1920x1080. NOT near as crisp/clear as the 24" one.
.. A viso TV - Didn't care for, Just using it as a spare TV.

If less than 27" recommend the Combo Monitor/HDTV - BUT verify it has suffenint inputs of the Type needed. Above the 24 In monitor/HDTVs get expensive, so yes go for the HDTV. HOWEVER, I would first select a model, go to a Brick and Morter store such as bestbuy and have them connect to a Computer and Visuall look at the display.
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August 7, 2012 5:22:43 PM

Mr____ has a good recommendation. Try to look at the reviews for people using the TV as a monitor and see what they say.

TV's don't have the same intended use, and so they aren't designed with as tight of specifications as monitors. Some may have monitor level quality panels, and some may not; people using them as TVs wouldn't notice, but someone using it as a monitor will.
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August 7, 2012 5:23:58 PM

maxinexus said:
The chart is for TV not monitors. The recommended viewing distance for any monitor is 20-40 inches. Monitor and TV viewing distance is different because of the dot pitch. Average monitors have 0.26mm dp and avarage TV has 0.36mm dp. That is why TVs are so grainy from upclose. I'm running 30" monitor and it is 34 inches away from my eyes...and you can not see any pixels. The image is crystal clear and font is sharp. Try that with a 30" TV...Good luck.



I know... Hence why i said it has to do with how far away you sit. Hence why i put an example showing how far away it is recommended to sit for the size of tv you get. Hence why i also said it was user preference. Personally i don't like sitting as close as you are to a screen.

*edit* Guessing the confusion came from me saying Monitor instead of TV screen. lol. N e who. I still prefer a big tv over a computer monitor. User pref OP thats really all it comes down to.
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a b C Monitor
August 7, 2012 5:28:16 PM

Inaddition to what maxinexus stated.
.. almost all TVs use a TN LCD panel with the only diff being the type og backlighting used (this is also true for many of the smaller Monitors). A higher end Large screen monitor will use a IPS LCD screen. and as maxinexus indicated cost an arm and a leg.
The Samsung 27 In uses a PLS LCD which is nearly as good as the ISP - But still cost $840.

Your best bet might be to get the largest Monitor that you can afford and connect a stand-a-lone Blueray/DVD player with a tunner and connect ant/cable input to it.

Here is an excellent 24 " for just $320 (with the PLS panel and 1920 x 1200 resolution)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Only draw back is it has a dataport Plus DVI input and No HDMI input. In which case if you go with the Stand-a-lone tuner/Blueray drive (For TV input) just make sure it has a dataport output.
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August 7, 2012 6:59:44 PM

Best answer selected by Primal.
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August 7, 2012 7:01:23 PM

RetiredChief said:
Inaddition to what maxinexus stated.
.. almost all TVs use a TN LCD panel with the only diff being the type og backlighting used (this is also true for many of the smaller Monitors). A higher end Large screen monitor will use a IPS LCD screen. and as maxinexus indicated cost an arm and a leg.
The Samsung 27 In uses a PLS LCD which is nearly as good as the ISP - But still cost $840.

Your best bet might be to get the largest Monitor that you can afford and connect a stand-a-lone Blueray/DVD player with a tunner and connect ant/cable input to it.

Here is an excellent 24 " for just $320 (with the PLS panel and 1920 x 1200 resolution)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Only draw back is it has a dataport Plus DVI input and No HDMI input. In which case if you go with the Stand-a-lone tuner/Blueray drive (For TV input) just make sure it has a dataport output.

Thanks you have answered my question and more. So im kinda derping (i was out in the sun for 2 hours) i would be able to run a blu ray through my 5.25 bay to the monitor out of the back of my graphics card using a DVI/HMDI cable. ?
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August 7, 2012 7:32:52 PM

Well, the HD standard is 1920x1080, so when watching movies or shows you would have 60 pixels of black bars at the top and bottom. Some people really prefer 1200, though. It's not so much an upgrade; just personal preference. If you find a screen you like, don't sweat the difference.
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August 7, 2012 9:01:42 PM

You'll need to use an HDMI cable to play BluRay, and you'll have to have software for playing the discs (to my knowledge, there is no free software to play a bluray movie, other than by ripping it to another format that can be played); all of this is due to the ridiculous copy protection they feel is going to prevent people from copying. (Ironically, it's quite a bit easier to rip the video than it is to simply watch it from what I understand).
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a b C Monitor
August 7, 2012 9:12:47 PM

On the Monitor (1 each HDMI and DVI and D-sub inputs) Seems to have good User feedback
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

On DVD drive;
http://www.newegg.com/Store/SubCategory.aspx?SubCategor...
Caution Blue-ray playback software is REQUIRED and with the Cheapear OEM drives it is a real Hit/mis deal and The Software generall runs 50 Bucks and up. Normally the "retail" boxed version come with software.

This is higher priced but allows wrinting to BD-R and -RE media, what I have ( 2 LG and one pioneer - all three came with software)
http://www.newegg.com/Store/SubCategory.aspx?SubCategor...
But if OEM, it's still a hit & Miss

And Yes the Blu-ray outputed thru your Graphic card HDMI or DVI outputs ( difference being primarily that HDMI includes audio so that you can use your monitor (or TV) speakers) DVI does not carry audio. NOTE: mute point if you purchase the Monitor you listed as it has NO internal speakers (NO Biggy as Most monitor speakers are NOT the best). So can use DVI for Computer, and use the HDMI for a stand-a-lone DVD w/tuner.
Stand-a-long DVD recorder (two that I have - Had a couple of OLDER liteon versions.
DVD-DL: http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B0014F7Z94/ref=d...
DVD-RW (Cheaper, but not much): http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
@ http://www.overstock.com/Electronics/Toshiba-D-R560-DVD...


@ Mr_____ - On 1920 x 1200 & black bars at top bottom, This is not always the case as my Samsung HD240 did not, the monitor had a Mode for vertical stretching to fill screen - Change in proportion was harly noticable.

@ DjScribbles, Don't think it's somuch the DVD copy protection as it is the Codec Licensing and royalties.
And the copyprotection often prevents ripping unless you have a program simulart to AnyDVD.
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September 6, 2013 10:16:07 AM

mace200200 said:
An HDTV will cost more than a monitor


Where does this guy shop?! Lol
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September 6, 2013 10:40:26 AM

klepp0906 said:
mace200200 said:
An HDTV will cost more than a monitor


Where does this guy shop?! Lol


after one year and a month, the store may have closed down
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a b C Monitor
September 6, 2013 4:05:14 PM

Primal said:
I would like having the tv antenna inside my monitor and not taking up space inside my computer, it also costs less than a monitor of similiar size and then a tv antenna.
as far as i know if has the same refresh rate and dimensions... am i missing something?


Imo HDTV looks horrible for a pc screen compared to a monitor

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