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Matching CPU with GPU, does it matter?

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February 11, 2013 10:38:34 PM

I heard that performance is better if you match a AMD CPU with a AMD GPU and an Intel CPU with NVIDIA GPU. True or false?
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February 11, 2013 10:44:42 PM

true i guess, but i dont think its much of a difference if u pair a amd with intel or nvidia with amd.

I think it matters more on the game/application ur using and what its optimized for, as u see some games prefer nvidia and the other way around, but the performance isnt much
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February 11, 2013 10:49:29 PM

thats a false illusion. this is simply bogus info

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February 11, 2013 10:51:52 PM

iceclock said:
thats a false illusion. this is simply bogus info


There u go lol just took a guess
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February 11, 2013 10:58:15 PM

Intel with Nvidia is a complete illusion. What they may be talking about is your North Bridge. You may notice a slight difference in performance using an Nvidia North bridge over an ATI or Intel north bridge if you have an Nvidia card, same If you have an ATI north bridge running ATI graphics cards. I always match North Bridge chips to GPU's, the CPU won't matter since you won't be putting a AMD chip in an Intel Motherboard, it just won't work.

Of course I don't really know if it matters since generally speaking most PCIx16 slots are cross compatible with Nvidia or ATI GPU's.
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February 11, 2013 11:09:34 PM

that used to be the case a long time ago. today its really isnt the case.

zoom! magicka

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February 11, 2013 11:38:38 PM

adamv1 said:
Intel with Nvidia is a complete illusion. What they may be talking about is your North Bridge. You may notice a slight difference in performance using an Nvidia North bridge over an ATI or Intel north bridge if you have an Nvidia card, same If you have an ATI north bridge running ATI graphics cards. I always match North Bridge chips to GPU's, the CPU won't matter since you won't be putting a AMD chip in an Intel Motherboard, it just won't work.

Of course I don't really know if it matters since generally speaking most PCIx16 slots are cross compatible with Nvidia or ATI GPU's.


Nvidia or ATI never made North or South Bridges.

Are you sure you don't mean Nvidia PCIe lane controllers, for instance there are Nvidia chips that provide extra PCIe lane bandwidth(much like today's PLX chips) but they are linked to the southbridge(Chipset+CPU), they are not a "bridge" on their own.


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February 12, 2013 12:18:53 AM

northbridge 890fx or lower were crossfire only and nvidia nforce 750i/a, 680i/a sli boards where they were the chipset or north and south bridge
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February 12, 2013 12:28:07 AM

Hi :) 

Totally false these days...

All the best Brett :) 
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February 12, 2013 2:49:28 AM

Intel made the south and north bridge. lol

you guys need to get ur hardware game on

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February 12, 2013 3:53:42 AM

It's a myth. There is however one thing that possibly factored in people thinking this way and that is nVidia's PR, Marketing and obviously hard work behind CUDA which led to it's acceptance in GPU dependent Industry. CUDA being both an architecture and a programming standard saw heavy optimization for it in applications and this lead to most people experiencing better results in renderings and gaming with nVidia then ATI gpu's.

ATI/AMD GPU's were as good but their OpenCL was not as popular with developers early on. Throw in the fact that Intel regained top place with core architecture, and it started to seem that Intel-nVidia was a better combo (simply because they were better than their respective direct competitors) an often quoted example is the effect of PHYSX engine in Borderlands vs non physx gpu.

All this has changed over the years and applications are seeing better optimization for both OpenCL and CUDA and it's become a more even play ground. and Though it was always a myth, but now its even clearer that either cpu/gpu combo will work well.

only thing you need to ensure is that for the resolution that you plan to play at at the settings of your choice, you cpu/gpu combo must be balanced enough and neither should hold back the other. a G645 will badly bottleneck a GTX 690, at 1080p while a core i7 3770 will get bored gaming with an HD 4650 at that res.

good luck
-satyam
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February 12, 2013 9:56:26 AM

int1r3sting. indeed

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February 12, 2013 8:18:34 PM

darkspartenwarrior said:
Nvidia or ATI never made North or South Bridges.

Are you sure you don't mean Nvidia PCIe lane controllers, for instance there are Nvidia chips that provide extra PCIe lane bandwidth(much like today's PLX chips) but they are linked to the southbridge(Chipset+CPU), they are not a "bridge" on their own.


Wrong, where did you get that information? AMD, Nvidia and Intel make north and south bridge chips, duh.
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February 12, 2013 9:36:59 PM

dude nvidia have nothing to do with southbridge and northbridge, it came from intel originally and amd used the technology in a similar way.

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February 12, 2013 9:59:21 PM

"North Bridge: The Intel term for the main portion of the motherboard chipset that incorporates the interface between the processor and the rest of the motherboard


"South Bridge: The Intel term for the lower-speed component in the chipset that has always been a single individual chip.

existed since a while bud. nvidia dint do nothing.

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February 12, 2013 10:07:38 PM

Once again, the name has nothing to do with the products created around the theory.

Is every intel and AMD processor really just an IBM processor? Or have they made changes to the way they operate to increase performance? The term PCI comes from IBM as well, does that mean that PCI express or PCIx16 ( a product created by Tektronix but credited to Intel for the funding) where the sole property of said companies and could never be reproduced in a better quality or made to operate more effectively by another manufacturer?

What your saying is that because intel created the term north and south bridge there is no way Nvidia could have also created a north and south bridge. But as you can see the Nforce4 chip was a north and south bridge in one for the AMD processor. It also had allot of new features at the time it was introduced that intel had not created.

Darkspartan said NVidia and ATI or AMD now, never made north and south bridges, but clearly they did and still do.
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February 12, 2013 10:41:10 PM

they dint, they just used already created technology.

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February 12, 2013 10:41:34 PM

its not a term its part of the chipset.

actual physical things, not a term coined.

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