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Just built a computer, doesnt turn on?

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February 13, 2013 4:01:48 AM

Hello, today my computer parts finally came in and i was super excited to build it. It is my first build, but i have replaced motherboards before.
So i made sure that the power supply was connected to everything, the mother board(20pin and 6 or 8 pin, cant remember, ontop of the cpu fan), the dvd drive, hdd, and the cpu fan is connected to the motherboard. I connected the little wires that are from the case onto the motherboard as well, pled, reset switch, etc. WHenver i press the power button on the case, nothing happens. The Light on the motherboard is on, and i even charged my phone via the usb port. So i know the motherboard is getting power, but everything else isnt. None of the fans move, on the case, and neither does the cpu fan. I am out of troubleshooting ideas. Any help? Oh, and i did make sure the cpu was compatible beforehand, i had severeal people and the tigerdirect guys give advice on the parts. Below are my parts:
-Ultra LSP750 750-Watt Power Supply
-AMD FD8120FRGUBOX FX-8120 Processor - Eight Core, 8MB L3 Cache, 8MB L2 Cache, 3.10GHz (4.00GHz Max Turbo), Socket AM3+, 125W, Fan, Unlocked, Retail
-WD Blue WD5000AAKX 500GB Desktop Hard Drive - 3.5", SATA, 7200RPM, 16MB Cache
-Samsung SH-224BB/BEBE Internal 24X DVD Burner -Tray, SATA, 1.5MB Buffer Memory, 16x DVD-R Read, 48x CD-R Write
-ASUS M5A97 LE R2.0 AM3+ Motherboard - ATX, Socket AM3+, AMD 970 Chipset, AMD FX, 2133MHz DDR3 (O.C.), SATA 6.0 Gb/s, RAID, 8-CH Audio, Gigabit LAN, USB 3.0, CrossFireX Ready
-Kingston HyperX KHX1600C9D3K2/8GX 8GB Desktop Memory Kit - DDR3, (2 x 4GB), PC3-12800, 1600MHz, CL9, Intel XMP Ready

Remeber, the motherboard light is on, and even charged my phone and everything from the usb on the back. No fans work,
Not sure if i did the screwdriver thing onto the pin clusters correctly, but that didnt work. (connecting the 2 pins where it says the powerswitch is supposed to be att)
When installing the mb i used a magnetic screwdriver.
a b V Motherboard
February 13, 2013 4:17:23 AM

I can't do much without physically looking at it. Sounds like ~something~ is not plugged in properly and the system won't initialize. This tends to happen when there is electronically something "not right".

Zero step, ground yourself and make sure your working on a flat non-carpet surface.

First step, unplug everything except the CPU on the motherboard.
Take out the DVD-ROM, HDD, and any additional cards or components so that only the case, PSU and mobo are inside.

Second stop, check the ATX power connected to the motherboard and ensure all 24 pins are plugged in, often the 24-pin connector is a 20+4, make sure those four are lined up. Also they may be a 4 or 8 pin 12V ATX power connected that goes into the motherboard. Find out if it's four or eight and ensure the right connector is plugged in, it should be black and yellow wires with a key on the plug.

Third step,
After your 100% sure the power wiring to the board is correct and that the HSF is pluged into a board header properly (three pin white connector). Connect the power button connector and speaker (if there is one) to the motherboard (ignore the rest for now). Stick one DIMM into a memory socket A1 (manual should tell you). After this plug the power in and push the button. See if the fan PSU fan starts and if the CPU fan starts spinning, you should hear some beeps this is normal. This will tell you if something is wrong with the PSU or wiring.

Now if the above works do the following.

Add in the GPU card and ensure your plugging in the additional 6 or 8 pin power connectors. Plug monitor into the GPU card. Turn on power again, should see BIOS post and complain about no HDD and what not.

Now add in each stick of memory, one at a time and turn on the system in between to ensure you see a BIOS POST and that it counts the memory.

After that add in the HDD and DVD-ROM the exact same way.

During this process if at any point the system doesn't turn on, undo the last step / component. You will identify the problem, either as a wiring issue or as a faulty component.

-=Note=-

STOP USING A BARE METAL SCREW DRIVER ON WIRE HEADERS

That's very very dangerous and could result in you damaging your board or even shocking yourself. I know the "trick" your talking about, using a long thin screwdriver to short out the power connectors instead of plugging in a push button switch. Don't do it, your likely to short out other things while your in there and it may damage your system.
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February 13, 2013 4:27:37 AM

The first thing that came to my mind was to do what you told me to do, but still a no-go. I am however kind of skeptical of 2 things, which is the installation of the motherboard, with the screws, and the little wires that connect to the front of the case.
The mother board required only 6 screws but it seems that the ends of the motherboard push down easily, if you put some pressure the motherboard flexes, but there are no other holes for screws there. Also, the case came with a set of screws that go underneath the motherboard 8 flat, ones, and 2 with a raised top. I used both of these with the raised top, and 4 of the flat ones. Not sure if this was right or not.
The little wires that connect to the front of the case are PLED+, PLED-, POWERSWITCH, POWERESETSW, HDDLED. I put the Powerswitch first followed by the powerresetsweitch after it. Not sure of the PLED+, and PLED- are put in wrong or not, they are only 1 wire each and a a gap in the middle between them.
And by the way, I only did it because i found that trick on this very site. :D 
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a b V Motherboard
February 13, 2013 4:38:59 AM

How far did you get though?

From your reply I'm going to assume step 1, just the board + cpu + 1 stick of memory with the PSU and no initialization is happening.

Now things get interesting, take the motherboard out of the case and place it on a flat non-conductive surface, like a sheet of newspaper. Ensure memory + HSF is connected. Take out PSU and do the same thing. Plug the 24 (should be 24 not 20) pin ATX connector into the board along with the 12v 4 pin ATX power connector. Now your going to need to get something to turn the power on that's not a screw driver. What I did was pull the power button off and old case and use that. Shorting out pins is very dangerous, some of those have +5V on them and can cause damage if their shorted to the wrong thing.

The back of the motherboard shorting to the case back plane could easily cause the power problem your describe.
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February 13, 2013 4:46:06 AM

I will physically try this tomorrow, as i have to sleep because as of now i have to get up in a couple hours (:
one question though, when you said
"Now your going to need to get something to turn the power on that's not a screw driver. What I did was pull the power button off and old case and use that. Shorting out pins is very dangerous, some of those have +5V on them and can cause damage if their shorted to the wrong thing.
"
I dont have an old case, is there a way to check for shorts by using a multi-meter?
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a b V Motherboard
February 13, 2013 5:15:16 AM

arroma said:
I will physically try this tomorrow, as i have to sleep because as of now i have to get up in a couple hours (:
one question though, when you said
"Now your going to need to get something to turn the power on that's not a screw driver. What I did was pull the power button off and old case and use that. Shorting out pins is very dangerous, some of those have +5V on them and can cause damage if their shorted to the wrong thing.
"
I dont have an old case, is there a way to check for shorts by using a multi-meter?



Visit your local radio shack or hobbyist store, they should have one there. One end will have the two pin female connector you see inside your case, the other will be a button or some wires. Multi-meter is for checking shorts that already exist, by sticking that screw driver inside you creating a short to turn on the power. If that screw driver touch's the wrong thing it'll create another short that your not supposed to have and could break something.
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a c 469 V Motherboard
February 13, 2013 5:36:40 AM

anther short point is the mb shield that on the back of the mb. if the fingers are too long they can short the mb out.
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February 13, 2013 5:49:09 AM

Could be your CPU/RAM were DoA. Not extremely likely, but it's worth checking out also.
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a c 156 V Motherboard
February 13, 2013 6:10:05 AM

palladin is right. If you have done about all the troubleshooting you can with the assembled computer, it is time to strip all the parts out of the case and rebuild on a flat nonconducting surface.

The motherboard power LED and the USB charging work because they are tied to the always on, standby power supply which is completely separate from the main power supply.

The switches are non-polarized. The white wires to the LED's are generally the negative leads. But, for example, if the drive LED does not illuminate when it should, simply reverse the LED connections. You will not damage an LED by connecting it backwards. It simply will not work.

The older cases use a 3 pin spacing for the power LED. New motherboards use a 2 pin spacing. You can either (very carefully) move the positive contact from the outside to the center unused position, or you can very carefully split the connector.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I have more detailed troubleshooting instructions.

Work systematically through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If not, continue.
The following is an expansion of my troubleshooting tips in the breadboarding link in the "Cannot boot" thread.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
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a b V Motherboard
February 13, 2013 7:22:07 AM

did you use standoffs below the motherboard, i've seen 3 of those this year, same symptoms.
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February 13, 2013 2:22:01 PM

arroma said:
Hello, today my computer parts finally came in and i was super excited to build it. It is my first build, but i have replaced motherboards before.
So i made sure that the power supply was connected to everything, the mother board(20pin and 6 or 8 pin, cant remember, ontop of the cpu fan), the dvd drive, hdd, and the cpu fan is connected to the motherboard. I connected the little wires that are from the case onto the motherboard as well, pled, reset switch, etc. WHenver i press the power button on the case, nothing happens. The Light on the motherboard is on, and i even charged my phone via the usb port. So i know the motherboard is getting power, but everything else isnt. None of the fans move, on the case, and neither does the cpu fan. I am out of troubleshooting ideas. Any help? Oh, and i did make sure the cpu was compatible beforehand, i had severeal people and the tigerdirect guys give advice on the parts. Below are my parts:
-Ultra LSP750 750-Watt Power Supply
-AMD FD8120FRGUBOX FX-8120 Processor - Eight Core, 8MB L3 Cache, 8MB L2 Cache, 3.10GHz (4.00GHz Max Turbo), Socket AM3+, 125W, Fan, Unlocked, Retail
-WD Blue WD5000AAKX 500GB Desktop Hard Drive - 3.5", SATA, 7200RPM, 16MB Cache
-Samsung SH-224BB/BEBE Internal 24X DVD Burner -Tray, SATA, 1.5MB Buffer Memory, 16x DVD-R Read, 48x CD-R Write
-ASUS M5A97 LE R2.0 AM3+ Motherboard - ATX, Socket AM3+, AMD 970 Chipset, AMD FX, 2133MHz DDR3 (O.C.), SATA 6.0 Gb/s, RAID, 8-CH Audio, Gigabit LAN, USB 3.0, CrossFireX Ready
-Kingston HyperX KHX1600C9D3K2/8GX 8GB Desktop Memory Kit - DDR3, (2 x 4GB), PC3-12800, 1600MHz, CL9, Intel XMP Ready

Remeber, the motherboard light is on, and even charged my phone and everything from the usb on the back. No fans work,
Not sure if i did the screwdriver thing onto the pin clusters correctly, but that didnt work. (connecting the 2 pins where it says the powerswitch is supposed to be att)
When installing the mb i used a magnetic screwdriver.



I had the same problem before it turn out to be my Power Supply & lose connections on my vga 6 pin going to my video card good luck
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Best solution

February 14, 2013 1:52:25 AM

Okay so i switched my old power supply with the new one and the pc fans seem to work, I'm guessing the new power supply is DOA. Sigh, now i have to return it. Could it be that it is too high of amperage/volts? The volts on the back of the psu is 115, so thats right. The new power supply doesnt start up my old pc.
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February 14, 2013 2:51:50 AM

good luck hope you get it up & running i had a same problem before it was a faulty power supply it was brand new the store had 10 whit the same problem a bad Bach they gave me a diffident brand an it fire right up
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a b V Motherboard
February 14, 2013 3:27:14 AM

Probably a wiring problem inside the PSU. I tend to refer people to the Corsair brand though there are others of the same quality. The HX750 is rock solid and modular. I've always said the two area's you never go cheap are the Motherboard and the PSU.
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February 14, 2013 3:41:42 AM

what do you think about
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Thermaltake+-+SMART+Series+...
i know we can a cheaper one for the money online but i am really anxious about getting this pc up and running. ordo you think i can go lower with watts with the cpu being 125 watt and my gpu is an old 5670 i got for christmas like 2 years ago requiring 400 watt ,
until i have enough for a 7000 series card lae\ter this month
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a c 469 V Motherboard
February 14, 2013 4:42:32 AM

you get a better deal and power supply from micro center or new egg. most time with new egg you get your ps in two or three days. they have the cosair 750 units on sale for 69.00 after rebate and the 650 for the same price.
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