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Intel i7-3770S config BIG questionmark

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October 1, 2012 7:17:40 PM

I'm planning to build quite a gaming rig based on an Intel i7-3770S processor but I'm not sure which components to choose next to it. The main parts of the system would be the folowing:

CPU: Intel i7-3770S
Memory: 8 GBs of some 1866 MHz DDR3 RAM
Graphics: Gainward GTX 670 2GB Phantom

My questions are:
- I'm not sure which chipset to choose. I'm already sure that I'm gonna select an ASUS motherboard, the only thing I don't know is the concrete type. Which would fit best for a config like this?
- What brand would you suggest for the RAMs?
- And finally I'd also like to make a decent colling system (not a complete watercooling sys yet) for my CPU and for the RAMs. I was looking at a Corsair Hydro H70 liquid cooler for the processor and thinking about a RAM set like the Corsair Dominator GT which has a double-fan cooler.

There might be some "specialists" among you :)  so I'd ask for your opinion. But the most impoertant thing is the motherboard. I'm also curious if you have some better ideas.
Cheers!
October 1, 2012 7:23:59 PM

ps: I don't want to overclock the system!
October 1, 2012 9:01:10 PM

My slight question would be, why an i7-3770S? Unless you have other specific requirements, it gives you nothing over, say, i5-3770, apart from slightly lower TDP, which is pretty irrelevant, in a gaming rig. Also, why 1866 MHz RAM. That also gives you virtually nothing, over 1600 MHz, except more hassle.
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October 1, 2012 9:12:13 PM

malbluff said:
My slight question would be, why an i7-3770S? Unless you have other specific requirements, it gives you nothing over, say, i5-3770, apart from slightly lower TDP, which is pretty irrelevant, in a gaming rig. Also, why 1866 MHz RAM. That also gives you virtually nothing, over 1600 MHz, except more hassle.


Should be i5-3450 if you don't plan to overclock.
October 1, 2012 9:15:22 PM

georgeluz said:
I'm planning to build quite a gaming rig based on an Intel i7-3770S processor but I'm not sure which components to choose next to it. The main parts of the system would be the folowing:

CPU: Intel i7-3770S
Memory: 8 GBs of some 1866 MHz DDR3 RAM
Graphics: Gainward GTX 670 2GB Phantom

My questions are:
- I'm not sure which chipset to choose. I'm already sure that I'm gonna select an ASUS motherboard, the only thing I don't know is the concrete type. Which would fit best for a config like this?
- What brand would you suggest for the RAMs?
- And finally I'd also like to make a decent colling system (not a complete watercooling sys yet) for my CPU and for the RAMs. I was looking at a Corsair Hydro H70 liquid cooler for the processor and thinking about a RAM set like the Corsair Dominator GT which has a double-fan cooler.

There might be some "specialists" among you :)  so I'd ask for your opinion. But the most impoertant thing is the motherboard. I'm also curious if you have some better ideas.
Cheers!


I agree with malbluff, why the 3770S? The i5-3570 (which is what I think malbluff meant) is about $90 cheaper and is currently the best gaming CPU when you look at performance vs. price. (You could get the K version, but you said you weren't overclocking). http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Same with the RAM. Unless you are getting a wicked price for the kit, then 1600 should be fine. I've seen the prices for 8GB 1600 kits go as low as $45 in Canada.

I would strongly reconsider your graphics card manufacturer. It's notoriously difficult to get a hold of that specific card, and I've heard negative reviews about their version of that card. Why not go with a more reputable Gigabye, ASUS, MSI, Zotac, Galaxy, PNY, or EVGA brand?

With regards to the motherboard, if you're sure its an ASUS, then their P8Z77-V line is a very set of motherboards. Depending on how many features you want, you can spend upwards of $250 for a DELUXE model. If you'd like to be cost-effective, then the ASUS P8Z77-V LK is a pretty good choice at $149.99 (there's a $20 rebate, dropping the price to $129.99 as well). http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
October 1, 2012 9:25:11 PM

For the RAM, you could go with: G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL. Currently on sale, and you can get $5 off if you buy today.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Since you are not overclocking, the stock heatsink provided with the CPU should be more than enough for your needs. Same with the RAM - it won't really get hot enough under your normal (non-overclocked) use.
October 1, 2012 10:10:16 PM

Deemo13 said:
Should be i5-3450 if you don't plan to overclock.

That was a typo. I actually meant to put the "non-K" i5-3570, only as a closest reference to that i7-3770S. The only slight drawback with i5-3450, is it's, I understand, being discontinued.
October 3, 2012 11:08:42 PM

First of all thank you guys for your kind answers!

Well my first point of view was to build a really strong machine that I won't have to strengthen in the future. That's why I first thought of an i7 and neglected the idea of an i5. I knew that there's no difference in the number of cores but the number of threads in them, I only assumed that some day it'll bring out its benefits.

Concerning my choice on the video card, I chose the brand because I've already consumed two Gainward cards. They are pretty well made considering their cooling design and very reliable, also overclockable by their software a little. It isn't difficult for me to get one because I'm living in Hungary, middle Europe, only two countries away from Germany, the home of Gainward cards. I don't know what you evilqueens read about this card, but I'd be happy if you said a few words about it! What I read and saw about it until now was pretty positive. I.e. I'd choose it for its classy, very quiet and also very effective cooling structure. At least they claim that.

Why do you suggest G.Skill? Are they more durable than other brands? I checked after it and I think it is as difficult to get one in Europe as to get a Gainward in the States or Canada :p  What about some other brand? I'm maybe thinking about future overclocking..

I was browsing the motherboards recently and saw about the Z77 chipset you suggested. I found the Sabertooth Z77, read a little about it and just started to think about it. I like its pretty unique cooling system and that tough thermal armor design but honestly I don't know if it's worth the price. I liked it the best for its native support for 1866 MHz RAMs. I could get one here in Hungary for around $267. The reason why I'm so anxious about cooling every stuff is because of my current system. It just seems that something always gets overheated a little, especially in the summer when temps are higher. I'd be thrilled if you guys could convict me of a good choice of a motherboard.

Thank you very much in anticipation :) 
October 4, 2012 12:40:53 PM

So in reply to your messages.
October 5, 2012 6:15:31 AM

georgeluz said:
First of all thank you guys for your kind answers!

Well my first point of view was to build a really strong machine that I won't have to strengthen in the future. That's why I first thought of an i7 and neglected the idea of an i5. I knew that there's no difference in the number of cores but the number of threads in them, I only assumed that some day it'll bring out its benefits.


This will only be true if you are doing heavy rendering, or using applications that are heavily threaded. For the average user, especially for gaming, there will be no discernible difference between the i7-3770K and the i5-3570K processors. It's up to you, but I'd always try to save money in my build as that will allow you to make more meaningful upgrades elsewhere or in the future.

georgeluz said:
Concerning my choice on the video card, I chose the brand because I've already consumed two Gainward cards. They are pretty well made considering their cooling design and very reliable, also overclockable by their software a little. It isn't difficult for me to get one because I'm living in Hungary, middle Europe, only two countries away from Germany, the home of Gainward cards. I don't know what you evilqueens read about this card, but I'd be happy if you said a few words about it! What I read and saw about it until now was pretty positive. I.e. I'd choose it for its classy, very quiet and also very effective cooling structure. At least they claim that.


Ah, I didn't realize you were in Europe - I guess you won't have much of an issue getting the card then :p  Well - I recently saw a review (either here or somewhere else - I can't remember at the moment) doing a comparison of 5-6 GTX670 cards where the Gainward card was considerably noisier and didn't have as good cooling performance compared to the brands I mentioned. If you have had good experience with them, then by all means continue, but I'm just giving my thoughts.

georgeluz said:
Why do you suggest G.Skill? Are they more durable than other brands? I checked after it and I think it is as difficult to get one in Europe as to get a Gainward in the States or Canada :p  What about some other brand? I'm maybe thinking about future overclocking..


G.Skill is a very reputable memory manufacturer. Corsair is also good too. The real point of my post was to just provide an example and to encourage you to get a 1600 MHz kit as opposed to a 1866Mhz one. In the end, its up to you, of course. You can overclock the G.Skill RAM as well as the Corsair RAM.

georgeluz said:
I was browsing the motherboards recently and saw about the Z77 chipset you suggested. I found the Sabertooth Z77, read a little about it and just started to think about it. I like its pretty unique cooling system and that tough thermal armor design but honestly I don't know if it's worth the price. I liked it the best for its native support for 1866 MHz RAMs. I could get one here in Hungary for around $267. The reason why I'm so anxious about cooling every stuff is because of my current system. It just seems that something always gets overheated a little, especially in the summer when temps are higher. I'd be thrilled if you guys could convict me of a good choice of a motherboard.


The Sabertooth is a very, very reliable motherboard. It comes with the longest warranty of the Z77 line from ASUS and it does look very durable as well! $267 is probably a little expensive as it can be attained for around $210-220 here in North America. That is why I recommended the P8Z77-V Pro or LK models which are cheaper.

I wouldn't worry too much about cooling the motherboard - they are pretty robust with good VRM heatsinks. If you plan on overclocking your CPU - then definitely invest in a good coooler. Noctua (based out of Austria) has a great product: NH-D14. There are other good coolers from Cooler Master (Hyper 212 Evo) and Phanteks as well.

In terms of keeping things cool - you should look into a good case that has good airflow as well. There are some nice cases from Antec and Cooler Master. Corsair has some good cases too (500R, or 600T) - but typically isn't as strong in terms of airflow (although this can be easily alleviated by a couple of case fans in the right place).

Hope this helps!
October 11, 2012 7:29:44 PM

Dear evilqueens,

First in first thank you very much for your abundant answer and my apologizes for my late reply. Meanwhile I was hardly seeking for the best solution I could have, read reviews watched tests etc. although I didn't find answers for every question.
evilqueens said:
G.Skill is a very reputable memory manufacturer. Corsair is also good too. The real point of my post was to just provide an example and to encourage you to get a 1600 MHz kit as opposed to a 1866Mhz one. In the end, its up to you, of course. You can overclock the G.Skill RAM as well as the Corsair RAM.

I've been using Kingston ever since but those were only DDR1. What would you say about a HyperX? Would they fit for the purpose of gaming?

Maybe I wasn't precise enough, but this is the 1st one. I couldn't really figure it out what the Sabertooth's 1866-memory support does mean, but I found some guys who even put 2133MHz dimms in it. Ie. for the P8Z77 series ASUS claims that there is a certain support for accepting higher speed RAMs than the chipset's native maximum support. But this is not the case at the Sabertooth, cause they only highlighted the 1866 as the highest type. I know that the mtb is also capable for 2133 RAMs and I know that from another forum, but what is the situation when you put in an 1866 one? It is just the first stair above the chipset-supported 1600. Do you happen to know what happens here? Will the bios turn up the multipliers as the processor's clock would be affected too? I've also read a few articles 'bout this but it's still not clear to me. Could someone pls help?

And as 2nd, should I buy a higher clocked memory if I want to have higher clocks for the memories in the future or would a basic 1600 be enough?
evilqueens said:
I wouldn't worry too much about cooling the motherboard - they are pretty robust with good VRM heatsinks. If you plan on overclocking your CPU - then definitely invest in a good coooler. Noctua (based out of Austria) has a great product: NH-D14. There are other good coolers from Cooler Master (Hyper 212 Evo) and Phanteks as well.

In terms of keeping things cool - you should look into a good case that has good airflow as well. There are some nice cases from Antec and Cooler Master. Corsair has some good cases too (500R, or 600T) - but typically isn't as strong in terms of airflow (although this can be easily alleviated by a couple of case fans in the right place).

Thanks for these advices! Yes I know the Noctua products, their fans are pretty quiet and also have great airflows. I'm planning to buy two 120mms to perform as case fans for the time being, thereafter I'd possibly put them together to help a liquid cooler. I've also already seen a Corsair 600T case in a build log, it's a nice one.

Thank you kindly for replying.
October 11, 2012 8:27:01 PM

Firstly, unless your interest is in the technology of computing, rather than what they do, forget high frequency RAM. There is so little real benefit, above 1600MHz, that it's just not worth the hassle. If you really want it, then go for water cooling, and a Republic of Gamers mobo, and then you can do it properly. Other than that, go with i5-3570K (there is NO advantage to i7, for gaming, and probably won't be for at least 5 years), an air cooler, 2x4GB of low profile RAM (Crucial Ballistix Sport, GSKill Ares, Corsair CML, or Mushkin Silverline), and Asus P8Z77-V Pro, or P8Z77-V LK.
Prefer Corsair Carbide, to Graphite. It's great build quality, and cable management, decent airflow (and options to add). The 500R one of my favourite cases.
!