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High CPU Temperature

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February 14, 2013 12:11:03 PM

Hello,

I am using an old PC with a Core 2 Duo 1.86 GHz CPU. It has a stock Intel HSF.

Recently, I realized that the CPU is idling at an abnormally high 62 C. I even replaced the thermal compound on the CPU (as it had completely dried up) and reseated the HSF. I broke a single push-pin while doing so, but the heatsink still fits firmly. Even after applying the thermal paste, there is no difference in temperature.

So, what might be the problem? Does a single failed push-pin cause so much difference in temperature? If the push-pin is not the problem why would the temperature be so high in the first place? IIRC, it used to idle at around 45-50 C.

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a b à CPUs
February 14, 2013 12:14:26 PM

Those temps are really high. What are your PCs specs. Is your case dirty? Loss of airflow could have caused it. I would replace the heatsink with a new one. I always put my heatsinks on outside the case. Its just easier, especially with those awful pushpin heatsinks.
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February 14, 2013 12:19:52 PM

A broken push-pin is goign to cause the heat-sink to transfer less heat from the CPU, so that is likely why you are having heat high CPU temps. I would invest in a new after-market CPU cooler to replace the current one.
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February 14, 2013 12:28:27 PM

Thank you for the replies guys.

maestro0428 said:
Those temps are really high. What are your PCs specs. Is your case dirty? Loss of airflow could have caused it. I would replace the heatsink with a new one. I always put my heatsinks on outside the case. Its just easier, especially with those awful pushpin heatsinks.

My case doesn't have a very good airflow but I ruled out this factor as it has been a constant all along. The CPU idled at a much lower temperature in the same case. I have cleaned the HSF too.


Quote:
A broken push-pin is goign to cause the heat-sink to transfer less heat from the CPU, so that is likely why you are having heat high CPU temps. I would invest in a new after-market CPU cooler to replace the current one.

I don't want to deal with these push-pins anymore and I just ordered a new HSF with screws, although I have no idea how to seat a HSF with screws. Do the screws go in the mobo holes and do you have to use nuts?
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a c 82 à CPUs
February 14, 2013 12:55:18 PM

you screw it onto a back plate that clamps onto the back of the mobo
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February 14, 2013 1:12:58 PM

13thmonkey said:
you screw it onto a back plate that clamps onto the back of the mobo

Thank you for the help.

Quick final question - I have ordered a new HSF as it seems that my current HSF is not working well (not sure). If my CPU temps don't drop even after installing the new HSF, what should I consider doing?
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a c 82 à CPUs
February 14, 2013 1:59:54 PM

we'll cross that when we come to it. airflow is useful.
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February 14, 2013 2:11:36 PM

Best answer selected by Healy.
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February 16, 2013 4:34:39 PM

Update/Conclusion for posterity:

1. A single broken push-pin can affect the cooling by a huge margin.
2. For installing a HSF with screws, you have to remove the motherboard first and then place the mounting plate of the HSF behind the motherboard so it stays there firmly when the motherboard is screwed back. Just screw the HSF in the threaded holes of the mounting plate. In my opinion, the HSF with screws are a lot better than the ones with Intel push-pins.

Thank you.
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