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Dedicated Graphics Memory Issue

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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August 13, 2012 10:44:20 PM

Hello,

Before I state my question, I'll post my system specs, if any additional information is needed, please let me know.

Laptop Model: Acer Aspire 7750G-6662
Intel i5-2430M 2.4GHz
4GB DDR3 Memory
640 GB HDD
Intel HD 3000 + AMD Radeon HD 6650M 2 GB VRAM

I finally figured out how to set the Radeon graphics as my only graphics in use. However, I don't think my laptop is running it at it's full potential.

I've tested it out on Arma 2, Crysis 2 and ran the 3D Mark test.

I often get lag in the games so after some research I found the program GPU-Z to monitor the memory usage.

In the "Memory Usage (Dedicated)" section, the highest number achieved on any of the three applications was 560MBs.

So my question is, does this mean it was only using 560MBs of the available 2 GBs that my Radeon card has? And if so, what can I do to increase this number to run the games more smoothly?

Thank you!
August 13, 2012 10:48:50 PM

I forgot to add that my operating system is: Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit.
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a c 191 U Graphics card
August 13, 2012 10:53:08 PM

Those are pretty high end games for that laptop.

Now graphics memory isnt everthing in the laptop. Think of it like this:

You've got a new Toyota Corolla. You decide that you want to put some Pirelli PZero tires (really good tires) on the car. Almost racing tires. Sure they are going to work great, but you arent going to be able to use the full potential of the tires because the rest of the car will be holding you back.

The 6650M is like that. The 6650 is like the Corolla and the tires is the available memory. The 6650 doesnt have that much power to begin with, so adding really nice tires on it is not going to make that much of a difference.
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August 13, 2012 11:14:47 PM

Deemo13 said:
Those are pretty high end games for that laptop.

Now graphics memory isnt everthing in the laptop. Think of it like this:

You've got a new Toyota Corolla. You decide that you want to put some Pirelli PZero tires (really good tires) on the car. Almost racing tires. Sure they are going to work great, but you arent going to be able to use the full potential of the tires because the rest of the car will be holding you back.

The 6650M is like that. The 6650 is like the Corolla and the tires is the available memory. The 6650 doesnt have that much power to begin with, so adding really nice tires on it is not going to make that much of a difference.



Thank you for your response.

So you're saying that even though it says it has 2GBs of dedicated VRAM, that it will never actually achieve using the full 2GBs?

If that is the case, why would it say it has 2GBs? Is it's failure to achieve the full 2GBs attributed to the graphics card itself, or is this attributed to the laptop specs overall, such as the processor speed?

I understand your analogy by saying that the 2GBs of available memory is good, but the 6650 itself doesn't have the power. However, my main point I don't understand, is why it is described as 2GBs if it's not able to achieve that.

Because I haven't done any modifications of hardware to this laptop, it would be like buying a ten speed bike, and then finding out it can only go up to the 5th speed.
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a c 191 U Graphics card
August 13, 2012 11:20:35 PM

Well, my Radeon HD6950 has 2GB of GDDR5 RAM, and I've read that the card itself will run out of steam before it will be able to use the full potential of the 2GB. More memory is usually needed to drive higher resolutions, but seeing as you're using a laptop, you are stuck with one resolution.

Another car analogy: Your Corolla, that you just bought and put really expensive tires on has a speedometer that goes to 140. Will the Corolla go 140? No. Its more of a headroom thing or a just-in-case type of thing really.

If you are like driving the display to like an HDTV and trying to game, it would be helpful to have the extra RAM.

I'm thinking you have one of two types of laptops. One type is a laptop with a 2GB dedicated video card.

But seeing as its a 6650M, its probably a shared memory system.

Basically, its a good thing that your computer doesnt use all 2GB of dedicated/shared RAM.
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a b U Graphics card
August 13, 2012 11:25:00 PM

Many low end desktop cards that use DDR3 memory have 2Gb just because the RAM is cheap and it makes people who don't know think its better. There are very few games that would need more that 1Gb RAM on a 1920 x 1080 screen on ultra settings so at your laptops resolution there is no need for it at all.
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August 13, 2012 11:47:14 PM

Deemo13 said:
Well, my Radeon HD6950 has 2GB of GDDR5 RAM, and I've read that the card itself will run out of steam before it will be able to use the full potential of the 2GB. More memory is usually needed to drive higher resolutions, but seeing as you're using a laptop, you are stuck with one resolution.

Another car analogy: Your Corolla, that you just bought and put really expensive tires on has a speedometer that goes to 140. Will the Corolla go 140? No. Its more of a headroom thing or a just-in-case type of thing really.

If you are like driving the display to like an HDTV and trying to game, it would be helpful to have the extra RAM.

I'm thinking you have one of two types of laptops. One type is a laptop with a 2GB dedicated video card.

But seeing as its a 6650M, its probably a shared memory system.

Basically, its a good thing that your computer doesnt use all 2GB of dedicated/shared RAM.



I did some more adjusting of settings and ran some more tests. The memory now peaked at just below 1GB, so I'm assuming the card is working properly as it should then and this is the most I'll get out of it. I wasn't expecting it to play high end games with blazing fast results on the highest settings, but I just wanted to make sure it wasn't under performing it's capabilities.

I have one last question that will resolve this issue:

Would upgrading my laptops 4GB DDR3 Memory have any effect on the Graphics Card or what kind of FPS I get on games? I was thinking of upgrading to 6 or 8 GBs for that reason only. But, if it won't have any effect, I'll skip out on that.

Thank you.
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a b U Graphics card
August 14, 2012 12:47:41 AM

If you had less than 4GB going to 4 would make a big differencs but if you have going going over won't help FPS more then 1 or 2 if that.
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a c 191 U Graphics card
August 14, 2012 1:12:24 AM

Like simon said, if you had less than 4 then it would be a different story. 4 is plenty for your laptop.
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August 14, 2012 2:10:22 AM

Thank you for all the assistance.
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August 14, 2012 2:10:40 AM

Best answer selected by Stagnant Sloth.
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a c 191 U Graphics card
August 14, 2012 2:40:09 AM

No problem! Just run some games on low settings.
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October 12, 2012 6:27:49 PM

Stagnant Sloth said:
Hello,

Before I state my question, I'll post my system specs, if any additional information is needed, please let me know.

Laptop Model: Acer Aspire 7750G-6662
Intel i5-2430M 2.4GHz
4GB DDR3 Memory
640 GB HDD
Intel HD 3000 + AMD Radeon HD 6650M 2 GB VRAM

I finally figured out how to set the Radeon graphics as my only graphics in use. However, I don't think my laptop is running it at it's full potential.

I've tested it out on Arma 2, Crysis 2 and ran the 3D Mark test.

I often get lag in the games so after some research I found the program GPU-Z to monitor the memory usage.

In the "Memory Usage (Dedicated)" section, the highest number achieved on any of the three applications was 560MBs.

So my question is, does this mean it was only using 560MBs of the available 2 GBs that my Radeon card has? And if so, what can I do to increase this number to run the games more smoothly?

Thank you!


How did you get the Radeon GPU to run as the only graphics card?
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