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SonicWALL/10--cable modem--dynamic IP configuration help n..

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Anonymous
December 23, 2004 7:33:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.networking.connectivity,alt.comp.networking.firewalls,alt.comp.networking.routers,comp.os.ms-windows.networking (More info?)

Hi...

I have a small home/office network with 4 PCs running XP Home. Until today,
I used DSL and my ISP used static IP addresses. I have a SonicWALL/10
firewall/router connected to the DSL modem, and a switch connected to the
SonicWALL. The PCs are connected to the switch via Cat5 cable. Using the
static IP addresses, it all works fine.

Today, I had Comcast high speed Internet service installed. The tech
attached one of my PCs to the new cable modem and it works fine. I have
been struggling all day trying to configure the SonicWALL to connect all the
PCs to the Internet using dynamic IP addresses. I set the SonicWALL to use
NAT with DHCP Client. I can see that the SonicWALL is getting IP and DNS
addresses from Comcast -- these numbers show up on the SonicWALL setup
screen. I have enabled DHCP in the SonicWALL, and I've set the PCs TCP/IP
setting to automatically obtain IP addresses. After making all the changes,
I restart the SonicWALL and the cable modem. I am not able to connect to
the Internet.

I have talked to Comcast several times and they aren't familiar enough with
the SonicWALL to help. My SonicWALL is old and SonicWALL won't talk to me
because my service agreement expired a long time ago. They want $75 for a
one-time tech support call.

I have the feeling that I have one small incorrect setting in the SonicWALL
interface that's keeping this from working. It seems the SonicWALL setup is
a bit more complicated than other routers because the Comcast tech on the
phone said a Linksys, Netgear or D-Link router is pretty much plug and play.
I hate to have buy one of those since I have the SonicWALL.

Can anyone help? I am pulling my hair out.... what's left of it.

Many thanks.

John
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 9:13:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.networking.connectivity,alt.comp.networking.firewalls,alt.comp.networking.routers,comp.os.ms-windows.networking (More info?)

PROBLEM SOLVED>>>>> no need to reply. Thank you.


It turns out my SonicWALL/10 is an old router and it needs to have the range
of IP address specified. In digging through the setup interface, I
discovered an Installation Wizard (buried several tabs in) and it walked me
through the DHCP setup, including creating the need IP address range. It's
working fine now.

John
December 27, 2004 1:36:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.networking.connectivity,alt.comp.networking.firewalls,alt.comp.networking.routers,comp.os.ms-windows.networking (More info?)

It is also the case with most if not all new routers you have to specify the
range for a very good reason.
in the case that in your network you want to also have static IP's for a
printer server for example,
if you used a "real" router that supported dhcp you would be able to define
more than 1 range.

"John Blaustein" <no@spam.com> wrote in message
news:bZKdnbLteYHI5lbcRVn-uQ@comcast.com...
> PROBLEM SOLVED>>>>> no need to reply. Thank you.
>
>
> It turns out my SonicWALL/10 is an old router and it needs to have the
> range of IP address specified. In digging through the setup interface, I
> discovered an Installation Wizard (buried several tabs in) and it walked
> me through the DHCP setup, including creating the need IP address range.
> It's working fine now.
>
> John
>
!