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$4000 Max budget, build me some greatness!

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October 3, 2012 11:27:19 PM

I have recently come across some money and now have $4000 to build on a new P.C. I tried a couple build possibilities of my own which I still am keeping track of but I would like to ask you pros at Tom's to see if you could do better because, honestly, you probably know a lot more and CAN do a much better job.

I need to buy a monitor, mouse, speakers, and a keyboard as well as the pc itself so keep that in mind!
October 3, 2012 11:41:57 PM

First off; decide on a desktop or laptop; many folks make the wrong decision and end up taking a loss when they sell the leftover system. 2 grand will build you a nice desktop system, but I suggest an hp i7 with free or low cost windows 8 upgrade if you've never built a system before. I don't recommend expensive parts for a first time builder. Have you ever built a pc from scratch?
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October 3, 2012 11:43:53 PM

What do you actually want to do with the computer? The build will look very different if it's for something like a video editing workstation as opposed to an all out gaming machine.
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October 4, 2012 12:07:29 AM

Sorry, in my excitement I forgot to list those important pieces of information XD It will be a gaming desktop.
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October 4, 2012 12:21:02 AM

o1die said:
First off; decide on a desktop or laptop; many folks make the wrong decision and end up taking a loss when they sell the leftover system. 2 grand will build you a nice desktop system, but I suggest an hp i7 with free or low cost windows 8 upgrade if you've never built a system before. I don't recommend expensive parts for a first time builder. Have you ever built a pc from scratch?



Hi :) 

I own computer shops that build high end gaming machines , and I totally agree with the above quote...

Get it built for you...do NOT build it yourself....NOT IF YOU ARE A FIRST TIME BUILDER...

2 reasons...

1, You get a warranty with a built one...

2, You screw up a build on a $4000 machine and its going to cost you a LOT !!

All the best Brett :) 
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October 4, 2012 12:32:35 AM

First off, might as well go big for $4000, get 3 monitors, 3-4 graphic cards, Intel 3960X cpu, 1500W power supply.

Build up your base system then finish it off with whaterver you have left for graphics cards.

As stated, if you haven't built one before, this is pretty much the base.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

add another gtx 680 or 2, your good for anything.
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October 4, 2012 1:25:42 AM

How much would it cost to get one built for me? It is my first time but I have watched literally six hours worth of how to videos. I feel very comfortable considering I will not be doing custom liquid cooling.
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October 4, 2012 1:29:02 AM

Also, Noob222, having four 680 4gb in sli with a 3030x and three monitors would already put me over my budget lol. Even subtracting one 680 which would not impact performance very much I would still need to fit the rest of it not counting monitors or cpu in $570, which could not happen.
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October 4, 2012 2:15:40 AM

pre-built options http://www.ibuypower.com/Store/Intel_X79_Core_i7_Config...

AS for saying that puts you over budget, maybe you were thinking the $1000 gtx 690 4gb, its already sli, you can't run 4, 2 is the max since its already 2 gpus on one card.

4X gtx 680 4gb $569 = $2276.
I7 3930 = 569
MB = $250

monitors run anywhere from $150-$500 each depending on how much you want to spend.

As i said, start from the base components, then figure out what gpu budget is going to be. The gtx 680 4gb isn't the most budget friendly option, 4 gtx 670s/7970 will only run $1596, thats already $675 cheaper.

ground up, 3930X - 569
MB ~ 250
Memory ~ $100 for 16gb
PSU ~ 200-250 for 1000W+
monitors ~ 750
HDDs ~100-350
OS ~ 150
gaming KB+Mouse ~ 100
Case ~100-200

Money for GPUs ~ 1400 give or take.
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October 4, 2012 6:56:12 AM

If I was to give you an outlay of what you should get I would look at;

i7 3770K (I know the status quo is to go with a 3960 but for gaming its a waste of $600)

ASUS maximus Extreme Z77

Coolermaster Silent Pro M2 1500w

Coolermaster CosmosII

Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme

2x HD Radeon 7970 Ghz Edition (Sapphire Toxic 6GB)

3xMonitors for Eyefinity 3

2xPlextor M3 256GB SSD's

2xSeagate 64MB HDD running RAID0

ASUS Xonar Phoebus.

4X8G G.Skill Tridents DDR3 2400

Probably not spend $4000 either.
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October 4, 2012 7:15:27 AM

sarinaide said:
If I was to give you an outlay of what you should get I would look at;

i7 3770K (I know the status quo is to go with a 3960 but for gaming its a waste of $600)

ASUS maximus Extreme Z77

Coolermaster Silent Pro M2 1500w

Coolermaster CosmosII

Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme

2x HD Radeon 7970 Ghz Edition (Sapphire Toxic 6GB)

3xMonitors for Eyefinity 3

2xPlextor M3 256GB SSD's

2xSeagate 64MB HDD running RAID0

ASUS Xonar Phoebus.

4X8G G.Skill Tridents DDR3 2400

Probably not spend $4000 either.



For the most part, I agree with this, with a couple exceptions:

There's no point in getting a 1500W PSU for a system that might draw 750-850W or so at the absolute most. I'd look into a good quality 1kW unit or so for that system, and you could probably get away with less. There's also no point in getting 2400MHz RAM - 1600-1866 works just fine, and is significantly cheaper.

I definitely agree about LGA1155 vs 2011 though - there's no point in paying the extra for LGA2011 unless you need the extra computational power, and games really don't take advantage of it. A nice moderately overclocked 3770k will be more than adequate for any game out there for some time to come.
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October 4, 2012 7:41:40 AM

do not for the love of god spend 4k on a pc 1 its over kill 2 its nice to have extra cash on had encase something blows for 2500 you can build a nice gaming rig with a few monitors dont forget that youll have to buy the os, also even tho intel are very nice if want to build something that isnt costing you more for the name go with amd you can get a nice 4-8core[even tho most games dont even use 2cores atm] and for the gfx card get 2 660ti [the oc vers] 16gigs of ddr3 ram[to the max of what the motherboard can handle] spend a little bit of extra money on cooling and a good psu get a 120gig ssd and a 2tb data drive you really dont need a sound card cause most of the time your going to use headphones dont go over board on the case and another thing get the case after you have found all the parts you want to put in also for the monitors 2 1080 monitors around 120-150 is all you really need cause if your not making any money gaming then there isnt really a good idea to go over board and max everything out to 11 and lastly even tho nobody has said this yet before powering up your pc for the first time check your cables atleast 3 or 4times and make sure its on a surge suppressor[this will cost you anywhere from 20 to 100+ dont skip this no point in losing all that money if something in your wall is bad]
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October 4, 2012 8:26:23 AM

cjl said:
For the most part, I agree with this, with a couple exceptions:

There's no point in getting a 1500W PSU for a system that might draw 750-850W or so at the absolute most. I'd look into a good quality 1kW unit or so for that system, and you could probably get away with less. There's also no point in getting 2400MHz RAM - 1600-1866 works just fine, and is significantly cheaper.

I definitely agree about LGA1155 vs 2011 though - there's no point in paying the extra for LGA2011 unless you need the extra computational power, and games really don't take advantage of it. A nice moderately overclocked 3770k will be more than adequate for any game out there for some time to come.



I only threw in the PSU and RAM suggestion as a sugar me up kind suggestion adding some truely over the top flavor to give a feeling of higher end; I mean I can argue that;

Corsair 600T
Corsair HX 1050
G.Skill Ripjaws Z 1866 are more than enough.

------------------------------------------------------
From my recent product testings;

ASRock OC Formula is a nice motherboard as well with an interesting Yellow/Black theme that works well with Geil Corsa Evo's and MSI Lightnings but that is more for the overclocker enthusiast.

__________________________________
I am very shallow when it comes to computer parts looking good and I build to a theme where most complement each other, I have found cable sleeving to be aesthetically appealing if you want your high end rig looking like a million dollars, also lighting and custom water cooling helps in that regard.

I did a full on AMD FX, Asus Crosshair V Formula Z, 7970 DUII's, custom water cooling with Red and Black tubing, Red and Black lighting and fans in a limited edition 600T red and black case, had purchased Black and Red sleeving from Million Dollar PC, the entire rig sold for more than I build it for.
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October 4, 2012 8:37:51 AM

Spend around 1600-1800 Bux and be happy knowing you didn't spend 2200 Bux on *** you didn't need
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October 4, 2012 9:00:48 AM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($25.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($139.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($193.77 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($413.78 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($413.78 @ NCIX US)
Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($101.60 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: XFX 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($84.98 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($91.81 @ Amazon)
Total: $1776.66
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

Add some great monitors, speakers and other stuff that will move over to the next system.
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October 4, 2012 10:31:58 AM

FinneousPJ said:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($25.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($139.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($193.77 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($413.78 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($413.78 @ NCIX US)
Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($101.60 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: XFX 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($84.98 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($91.81 @ Amazon)
Total: $1776.66
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

Add some great monitors, speakers and other stuff that will move over to the next system.


This is a nice build, the only change would be a Gigabyte Z77X UD5H, the 3H is fujita with the overclocking.
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October 4, 2012 10:48:49 AM

I7 3930k @4.6 2x680 (however im personally waiting for the next gens 780s) a ssd any ram will do however 1866 prefered should bring you in round 3300.00..
NUFF SAID..
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October 4, 2012 11:25:57 AM

You get $4000 and you are ready to throw them out of the window, right away. And not only this, you find some nerds supporting you doing it. Nice one.

Really, 4k bucks on a PC is a totally stupid overkill, especially for gaming. You can built an awesome rig for 1000$ - 1500$ and it will last for years. You have spare cash for any kind of emergency, some games to play on that PC and you won't start crying for a week if something on that machine blows up. Since A) you didn't spent all your money on it and B) you can replace it, since you didn't spent all your money it.
On top of that you can buy your girlfriend something nice and, after a few years, buy a new PC that will last you again for a few more years.

Just scrap the excitement and think about it.
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October 4, 2012 11:53:50 AM

Mike, spending 4 grand on a gaming system will get you no noticeable performance gains over a good 1500$ machine, aside from bragging rights and 2-3 more months until it becomes obsolete/underpowered. Noone can reliably tell the difference between 160 and 140 fps.

Are you truly willing to spend 2500$ extra just for a couple months and a temporary e-peen?

I agree with whatsthatnoise, please put that money to better use.
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October 4, 2012 12:00:12 PM

I am just going to be really left field here with an alternative.

FX 8150
Asus Crosshair V Formula Z
AMD Radeon BE RAM DDR3 1600
ASUS ROG Xonar Phoebus
Corsair AX 750
Corsair 600T
Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme.
OCZ Vertex 4 256GB SSD
HDD
Optical drive
HD 7970 Ghz edition or 2 x HD 7870 ghz edition GPU's
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October 4, 2012 12:10:00 PM

I built my first computer in 2008 and it lasted up to this point, cost me $2500 for the desktop.

I paid $3200 this time, because I use it for more thn gaming.

Any suggestion on a 3960 when you use it for gaming is a waste. Don't bother.

You can save that money on a decently clocked quad core 3770k. That would be more than enough.

Save that money, and buy 2, no more than 2, graphics cards. And make sure you get a nice solid state drive for your operating system, and hell, you could even afford another one just to hold some of your games with the money you wouldn't be using for a 3930.

Then the decision after that is, do I want to buy multiple monitors? 3? Your cost goes up by doing that so you have to figure that out.

So the overall point here is that even with some of the best hardware, like graphics cards and processors, you could be missing out on some better performance like solid state drives and faster RAM.

Go with the 3770k, it will give you many more options than just throwing down a thousand dollars for something that won't really matter much to you in the long run.
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October 4, 2012 12:42:05 PM

I just built you a PC that is simply AMAZING.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3820 3.6GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme 81.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-X79-UP4 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($258.70 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1.5TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($115.20 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos Deluxe 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($169.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 680 2GB Video Card (4-Way SLI) ($279.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 680 2GB Video Card (4-Way SLI) ($279.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 680 2GB Video Card (4-Way SLI) ($279.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 680 2GB Video Card (4-Way SLI) ($279.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Rosewill THOR V2 ATX Full Tower Case ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 1250W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($249.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($62.39 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Samsung S27A850D 27.0" Monitor ($749.99 @ Mac Connection)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($92.21 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Cooler Master CM Storm QuickFire Rapid Wired Gaming Keyboard ($66.64 @ Amazon)
Mouse: SteelSeries Sensei RAW Wired Laser Mouse ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $3515.02
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

It's just amazingly powerfull and just too good.
All of it's parts are top of the line.
The only thing it needs is a good sound system but since im pretty incompetent there i really can't help you with it.
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October 4, 2012 1:02:03 PM

lol 4 680's. :p 
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October 4, 2012 3:01:39 PM

I really like that build, but getting more than two 680's is so wasteful. A higher capcity Solid State Drive like 512 GB for about $400 could imrove your games if you buy it to hold them. (depending on how many games you have)
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October 4, 2012 4:01:46 PM

Spelli said:
Mike, spending 4 grand on a gaming system will get you no noticeable performance gains over a good 1500$ machine, aside from bragging rights and 2-3 more months until it becomes obsolete/underpowered. Noone can reliably tell the difference between 160 and 140 fps.

Are you truly willing to spend 2500$ extra just for a couple months and a temporary e-peen?

I agree with whatsthatnoise, please put that money to better use.

what about when running 3 video cards, your fps is only in the 60s for average? not all multi-gpu setups run 1024x640 resolution.

http://www.hardocp.com/article/2012/04/25/geforce_gtx_6...

If your spending $4000, there is no reason to build a single monitor system.

Vice versa as well, if your building a single monitor system, there is no reason to consider a $4000 budget.
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October 4, 2012 5:22:37 PM

You can build a 3 monitor gaming rig for around 2500$.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($309.99 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Prolimatech Megahalems Rev.B CPU Cooler ($59.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Patriot Viper Xtreme Series, Division 2 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2400 Memory ($76.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($99.00 @ B&H)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($432.86 @ Newegg)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($432.86 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 500R White ATX Mid Tower Case ($101.93 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: Silverstone Strider Plus 1000W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($159.98 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On IHBS112-04 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($60.39 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus VE248H 24.0" Monitor ($184.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus VE248H 24.0" Monitor ($184.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus VE248H 24.0" Monitor ($184.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($92.21 @ Amazon)
Total: $2606.15
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)


You could save some money with an i5 3570k instead of an i7, if you don't need/want a blu ray drive, choosing a cheaper case and going 22" screens instead of 24". This would chop of at least another 200 bucks.

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October 4, 2012 8:17:11 PM

Well here is my input.

If you are building this yourself for the first time... Be very careful and TEST every part you have! Got to make sure those expensive equipments work right.

Other wise you can try going to IbuyPower or CyberPower and spend your money there.. The parts they have aren't necessarily, the best priced or rated though.

If you are in an apartment make sure your renters insurance covers it..

Some more stuff:

If your fps is going to be above 120fps at all times, then you might as well get a 120 hz monitor/TV(s) that will display all those frames~ Most monitors are 60 hertz and don't even show the frames if they go above 60. You just won't have to worry about frame skip usually..

You could get wireless controller/keyboard and play on a comfy couch/chair from a large plasma screen 120hz tv! Little tv food stand would work as a mouse keyboard stand ha! (.. or buy a rolling little desk?)

Also consider a good quality surround sound system. And maybe a sound card to go with it.. Might as well, right?

Make sure to test EVERYTHING if you are making expensive parts fit into your computer. This means testing each pci slot you use and each gpu separately as well.

4 gpus' is overkill and unnecessary unless it's a cheaper card in my opinion. 3 will do fine/great with less stuttering than 2 as well. I've read a tom's hardware reviews to that effect.. But if two is over 120fps at all times then it doesn't matter either.


But..You know, if you are a gaming enthusiast with lots of time, you could also buy all the gaming consoles. All 3.
Then save $1000 dollars for games!
PLAY ALL THE GAMES (even ones you normally wouldn't har_)
pc or console with that money who cares. Or save some money and wait till next gen comes out.

Pc or console, there are a lot of good games out there to play. You should save some of that money for the games you are going to buy~ Unless you only play one game :/ . If that is the case then build for that one game, no need to go overboard.

$4000 would be enough for me to build multiple computers depending on price..

You could just build a good $1600ish computer now. And save the rest of the money to buy a upgraded computer 3-6 years from now. Or just upgrade parts consecutively?

Cooling is the biggest issue with a lot of gpus and OC'd cpu, a good case that can handle all that is necessary xO

Since you have that much money you could put two 500gb+ samsung 840 pro's in a raid array for huge SSD fast storage as well. But that would be very expensive.


__

Or you could by a used car. That would work. Might have to have 3k more to use for repairs though. After it's all fixed up it'll still be cheaper than a new one as long as the bill doesn't get over 12k. har.
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October 4, 2012 9:37:12 PM

Kamen_BG said:
I just built you a PC that is simply AMAZING.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3820 3.6GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme 81.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-X79-UP4 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($258.70 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1.5TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($115.20 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos Deluxe 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($169.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 680 2GB Video Card (4-Way SLI) ($279.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 680 2GB Video Card (4-Way SLI) ($279.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 680 2GB Video Card (4-Way SLI) ($279.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 680 2GB Video Card (4-Way SLI) ($279.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Rosewill THOR V2 ATX Full Tower Case ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 1250W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($249.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($62.39 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Samsung S27A850D 27.0" Monitor ($749.99 @ Mac Connection)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($92.21 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Cooler Master CM Storm QuickFire Rapid Wired Gaming Keyboard ($66.64 @ Amazon)
Mouse: SteelSeries Sensei RAW Wired Laser Mouse ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $3515.02
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

It's just amazingly powerfull and just too good.
All of it's parts are top of the line.
The only thing it needs is a good sound system but since im pretty incompetent there i really can't help you with it.


Quad SLI is pretty much for bragging rights only - there's pretty much zero point in going over 3 GPUs, as the gains are just not worth it. Even 3 is questionable, to be honest. Also, there's no point at all in going with X79 - you would get 95% of the performance of that build with 60% of the cost if you went with GTX 680 SLI (just a pair of them), and an LGA 1155 board with a 3770k.

Also, no way are you getting a 680 for $279. Not a chance.
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October 4, 2012 10:21:58 PM

Do you think it would be better to pay $4000 for a system now that will last and be able to run all games at max settings with the most demanding mods at 1080p 120hz for the next five years or do you think it would be better to spend about $2500 now and have $500 to spend on upgrades each year. Which do you think would better achieve the desired outcome of being able to play all games at max settings uber eye candy all the way with the most demanding textures enbs and other mods installed while maintaining a minimum of 60 fps on a 1080p screen, for the next four to five years (it still has to end up costing a total of $4000 by the end of those four to five years keep in mind). Like I said previously that would leave about $400 to $500 a year to upgrade, which could be used in two years to buy the next gen 700 series nvidia cards and maybe even put two in sli.
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October 4, 2012 11:43:19 PM

You still didn't tell us if you want multiple screens or just one.

A (dual) SLI/CrossFire setup with just one screen will last you definitely longer without an upgrade.

Who knows how games will evolve. As with anything; don't fix it if it isn't broken. Same goes for hardware upgrades. Don't upgrade for the sake of an upgrade, if your hardware does just fine.
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October 4, 2012 11:45:51 PM

Since that technology will get better is a given, and games might eventually become more demanding. I'd say go with the latter route:

Quote:
or do you think it would be better to spend about $2500 now and have $500 to spend on upgrades each year....Like I said previously that would leave about $400 to $500 a year to upgrade, which could be used in two years to buy the next gen 700 series nvidia cards and maybe even put two in sli.


This sort of progression seems better to me if you can make it work with quality parts. If you must use your money to buy the newest.


Otherwise, since you plan on buying very good components (better by half than what was available 4 years ago):

Quote:
Who knows how games will evolve. As with anything; don't fix it if it isn't broken. Same goes for hardware upgrades. Don't upgrade for the sake of an upgrade, if your hardware does just fine.


He has a good point P: Money comes and goes, hardware doesn't, unless it breaks..
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October 5, 2012 3:53:57 AM

mike88931 said:
Do you think it would be better to pay $4000 for a system now that will last and be able to run all games at max settings with the most demanding mods at 1080p 120hz for the next five years or do you think it would be better to spend about $2500 now and have $500 to spend on upgrades each year. Which do you think would better achieve the desired outcome of being able to play all games at max settings uber eye candy all the way with the most demanding textures enbs and other mods installed while maintaining a minimum of 60 fps on a 1080p screen, for the next four to five years (it still has to end up costing a total of $4000 by the end of those four to five years keep in mind). Like I said previously that would leave about $400 to $500 a year to upgrade, which could be used in two years to buy the next gen 700 series nvidia cards and maybe even put two in sli.

ummm you should spend 2500 now and you wont have to upgrade for atleast 2 or 3yrs also even if you spent 4k on a pc doesnt mean you wouldnt need to upgrade next yr a 4k pc may last 6 months it may go 7yrs the same can be said for a 2500 system most people only upgrade each yr cause they think they have to but the parts they have will last for a few yrs hell there are pc from the 90s still runnin and you dont know if youll still be into gaming in a few yrs most gamers on youtube have the same pc for a few yrs before upgrading like i said before only if your computer is how you make money then you should go ahead a get the best but if its not and its something you play on then be wise and dont blow your wad on a computer cause once you do youll most likely need money for something and all youll have is a 4k computer that if you had to sell in a hurry no one is going to touch it
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October 5, 2012 10:55:23 AM

Yes it's better to spend less now and save money for upgrades.
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October 5, 2012 4:12:40 PM

This topic has been moved from the section CPU & Components to section Systems by Mousemonkey
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October 5, 2012 4:53:05 PM

cjl said:
Quad SLI is pretty much for bragging rights only - there's pretty much zero point in going over 3 GPUs, as the gains are just not worth it. Even 3 is questionable, to be honest. Also, there's no point at all in going with X79 - you would get 95% of the performance of that build with 60% of the cost if you went with GTX 680 SLI (just a pair of them), and an LGA 1155 board with a 3770k.

Also, no way are you getting a 680 for $279. Not a chance.


Trust me i know he doen't need Quad SLI and it's mainly used for bragging rights but if he's willing to spend 4K on a PC, than he wants the best of the best.And right now, in my opinion that means Quad SLI.
And yeah the GTX 680's i included were a one day only offer so i'm going to update the build now.
This time it's going to be a bit more practical and cost efficient.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3820 3.6GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($25.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-X79-UP4 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($229.50 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1.5TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($115.20 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($387.86 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($387.86 @ Newegg)
Case: Rosewill THOR V2 ATX Full Tower Case ($124.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 1050W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($170.00 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($62.39 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Samsung S27A850D 27.0" Monitor ($749.99 @ Mac Connection)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($92.04 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Cooler Master CM Storm QuickFire Rapid Wired Gaming Keyboard ($70.65 @ Amazon)
Mouse: SteelSeries Sensei RAW Wired Laser Mouse ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $2976.43
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

And the reason i used a LGA 2011 platform is because the processor can later be upgraded to Ivy Bridge-E.
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October 5, 2012 5:29:17 PM

FinneousPJ said:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($25.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($139.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($193.77 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($413.78 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($413.78 @ NCIX US)
Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($101.60 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: XFX 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($84.98 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($91.81 @ Amazon)
Total: $1776.66
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

Add some great monitors, speakers and other stuff that will move over to the next system.


I will go with this build. i5 is a great gaming cpu right now with overclocking feature.
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October 5, 2012 5:35:12 PM

Case - $400 - Thermaltake Level 10 GT Snow Combo pack w/ matching KB, Mouse and Headset incl http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Case Fan - $8 - Thermaltake Blue120 mm http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
PSU - $187 - SeaSonic Platinum-1000 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
15% off w/ promo code PSU106, ends 10/6
MoBo - $457 - ASUS P8Z77 Sabertooth w/ 3570k http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...
CPU - incl - Intel Core i7-3570k Included w/ MoBo
Cooler - $86 - Phanteks PH-TC14PE http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
TIM - $5 - Shin Etsu http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
RAM - $90 - (2 x 8GB) Muskin Blackline DDR3 1600 CAS 7 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
GFX - $420 - Asus GTX 670 DCII 2GB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
GFX - $420 - Asus GTX 670 DCII 2GB same
GFX - $420 - Asus GTX 670 DCII 2GB same
HD - $160 - Seagate Barracuda XT 2TB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
SSD - $170 - Mushkin Chronos Deluxe 240 GB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
DVD Writer - $70 - Asus Model BW-12B1ST/BLK/G/AS http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Monitor $330 ASUS VG236H Black 23" http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Monitor $330 ASUS VG236H Black 23" Same
Monitor $330 ASUS VG236H Black 23" Same
Keyboard - incl Tt eSPORTS Mega G1 Included w/ Case
Mouse - incl Gaming Mouse Included w/ Case
Headphones - incl Shock Gaming Headset Included w/ Case
3D Kit incl nVidia Vision 2 3D Glasses http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
OS - $140 - Win 7-64 Home Professional http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Total $4,027

Could opt for twin 7970's but I went with the 670's as I'd never do 3 cards in CF
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October 5, 2012 6:06:29 PM

Well i support cjl, sarnide and others.

You could actually get an excellent gaming rig+a high-end/premium notebook for that money, if not other stuff and well.

I don't think you should go with an OEM or something like that, it's most satisfying when you do it yourself. heck, hardest part must be the CPU cooler and paste...

So i say:

1) Stick to a core i7-3770k, no need to go to the extreme edition chips, they'll only inflate your budget. 1 fps more with a 3960X wont really show, you know.

2) you mentioned 1080p at 120 Hz. 2x GTX 680 or 2xGTX 7970 would both be excellent cards at this resolution. You should be looking for 120 fps min at max settings.
If you think you'd like to try 3D gaming, then arguably go the nvidia route and grab 2 680s.

3) I agree with the "buy what you need now, and upgrade when you need to" philosophy, most cost effective.

4) If you want to keep your rig as ready-for-upgrades as possible, invest in three key areas: the motherboard, case, power supply and cooling, but primarily the first three.

a)Look for an ATX motherboard that supports thunderbolt and is at least $180. Look for the all standards that'll be relevant in the future: USB 3.0, SATA 3, PCIe 3.0 and Thunderbolt. Also, quality is paramount and above all else.

b)System components will keep getting more efficient over time and consume lower power. Right now this setup could consume up to 600W or so. Get a gold/platinum rated power supply with enough connectors. usually you wont find PSUs less than 750W with 4 PCIe connectors. Also, get a modular one.

c)"The case is your base" is what i read somewhere. Get one with known superior cooling, excellent reviews and enough space and connectivity options to fit your components and expose them to you. And also, you should love the design. If you're feeling adventurous, you could try something like this:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/making-a-custom-pc-...

d) Get the best cooling you can afford. Silent and high cooling performance. Doesn't HAVE to be liquid-cooled. High end ones like the Noctua DH-14 are excellent.

5) Get an SSD! Maybe 2, a 128GB for your OS and programs, and a 256GB+ for your games. IF you like, you could also get an additional 512GB one for your files, and back it up to a 1TB+ green drive (that'll sleep when it's inactive). Or whatever you like, just an idea. Separate SSDs in view of write endurance.

Point is, the only thing you'll probably be upgrading in the next 5 years (before a platform change) will be the GPUs, and that too maybe *once*.

Chase perfection of build man. In that sense if you spend more than $2k then that's ok. You should be like "wow, is that mine?" No matter how much you spend. Should show some character, that it's yours, a bit of you. That's probably why i said "build it yourself".

Just try not to overspend on the CPU and GPUs. Read reviews, other tech sites. And you're already cross referencing your on-paper builds with the ones here, which is a great thing to do.

Tell me if you want me to list parts. Feeling too lazy right now :D 

Cheers!
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October 5, 2012 10:00:41 PM

Brett928S2 said:
Hi :) 

I own computer shops that build high end gaming machines , and I totally agree with the above quote...

Get it built for you...do NOT build it yourself....NOT IF YOU ARE A FIRST TIME BUILDER...

2 reasons...

1, You get a warranty with a built one...

2, You screw up a build on a $4000 machine and its going to cost you a LOT !!

All the best Brett :) 



While that may be true for many people, I built a high end gaming rig last month with absolutely no problems. I just followed that newegg instructional video to a T and made surej to do my research instead of winging it. I just treated all parts with utmost care and didn't half ass my research. It was my first build but I was confident I could do it after some research.

I will say--DO NOT TRY TO PUT IT TOGETHER WITHOUTSOME KIND OF GUIDE. That would be suicidal!
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October 5, 2012 11:37:00 PM

o1die said:
First off; decide on a desktop or laptop; many folks make the wrong decision and end up taking a loss when they sell the leftover system. 2 grand will build you a nice desktop system, but I suggest an hp i7 with free or low cost windows 8 upgrade if you've never built a system before. I don't recommend expensive parts for a first time builder. Have you ever built a pc from scratch?


As long as he's SUPER careful and keeps himself grounded so he doesn't ruin the parts with static he should be find (I'd think at least).
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October 6, 2012 12:03:44 AM

i7 3770k
Gigabyte UD5H
16 GB Trident X 2400 G.Skill
Plextor M5P 256 GB SSD
2TB WD Black HDD
Cosmos 2 Case
Mionix 3200 mouse
Logitech G510 Keyboard
Audioengine 5+ Speakers
Asus Xonar STX Essence


Samsung S27A950D monitor
EVGA GTX 690 4GB
KingWin LZP 1000w PSU
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May 20, 2013 1:57:14 AM

4000 GET A CAR! OR BUY A HOUSE!!!
u really don't need a 4000 PC tust me just to play games! wtf
shit if u got money like that give me 4000
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May 20, 2013 2:09:47 AM

Dont go full retard

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Swiftech H220 55.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($149.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Tactical Tracer 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($124.99 @ Microcenter)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($67.19 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($309.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($309.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: NZXT Switch 810 (Black) ATX Full Tower Case ($145.46 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Rosewill Fortress 750W 80 PLUS Platinum Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor ($159.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Monitor: Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor ($159.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Monitor: Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor ($159.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $2187.51
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-20 05:08 EDT-0400)
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May 20, 2013 6:09:06 AM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($314.03 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($174.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($114.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($132.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case ($103.28 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($154.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.94 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VG248QE 144Hz 24.0" Monitor ($266.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $2452.14
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-20 09:08 EDT-0400)

Game at 120Hz on an awesome monitor.
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May 20, 2013 10:00:47 PM

I'm locking this - it's a year old thread.
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!