Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

CPU and Memory

Last response: in CPUs
Share
February 18, 2013 8:01:19 PM

I was looking at computer parts and I found a motherboard that supports DDR3 2400 Memory. When I started looking at CPUs I saw that some said something like "Integrated Memory Controller Speed - Support 4 channels DDR3 1600" Does that mean it won't work well with DDR3 2400 Memory?

More about : cpu memory

February 18, 2013 8:23:24 PM

i'm not too sure but you'll be fine with 1600mhz of ram to be honest and i don't think it means it won't work well i THINK it means it supports quad channel up to 1600mhz not too sure someone else might be more help. Also i think it won't be a problem as long as your motherboard supports 2400 you should be able to OC to 2400 from 1600 i think it just goes to 1600 by default could i see what processor you're looking at?
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
February 19, 2013 12:04:33 AM

Yeah 95% of the time DDR3 1600 is the way to go because you aren't going to notice a vast difference in performance but it will probably start to cost quite a lot more as you go to progressively fancy memory.

"4 channels DDR3 1600" means you are looking at something quite unusual I think, because very little supports Quad channel ram.

Most motherboards support dual channel ram but have 4 DIMM slots which are usually marked in alternate colours to indicate how you install pairs of sticks.

In a direct answer to your question, its most likely in that situation that 2400 ram will just run at 1600 speeds.
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 135 à CPUs
a b } Memory
February 19, 2013 12:32:09 AM

1600mhz is quite fine.


m
0
l
a c 195 à CPUs
a c 89 } Memory
February 19, 2013 12:44:45 AM

intel ivy bridge cpu memory controller is rated for 1600 ram. intel rates that as stock speed for the cpu.. intel knows that most 1.5v ram will run on there mb at that stock speed. when you go over that or over clock the cpu memory controller it depends on the quality of the cpu. not all cpu wafers are the same. the other issue as you push the cpu higher the sooner the memory controller can fail. some people who over clock there cpu buy the intel extra insurance because they do burn out cpus. if this is going to be your main build then stick with 1600 ram.
m
0
l
a c 135 à CPUs
a b } Memory
February 19, 2013 12:45:31 AM

1600mhz and 1.5 volts is the max if u want to keep ur intel warranty. anything over ur gonna crisp it

m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b } Memory
February 19, 2013 1:00:57 AM

quad channel, an i7 LGA 2011 socket. x79's if im not mistaken.
expensive stuff (board and cpu)
m
0
l
a c 135 à CPUs
a b } Memory
February 19, 2013 1:12:38 AM

your right . 2011 only.

m
0
l
a b à CPUs
February 19, 2013 1:26:32 AM

cartnickz said:
I was looking at computer parts and I found a motherboard that supports DDR3 2400 Memory. When I started looking at CPUs I saw that some said something like "Integrated Memory Controller Speed - Support 4 channels DDR3 1600" Does that mean it won't work well with DDR3 2400 Memory?


Like the X58 motherboards that were rated @ 1066-1333MHz (depending on the CPU) all that means is: If you go higher you are technically over clocking.

It doesn't mean that going higher will cause your system to crash, your CPU's memory controller will burn out or "anything over ur gonna crisp it "

What it does mean is Intel only guarantees that it will work up to that spec. So if you go over and end up with problems Intel can say "not our fault".

However Intel's specs are overly conservative and many (if not most) personal system builders go past this spec without issues and Intel knows this or they wouldn't sell overclocking insurance.

And even if you don't buy Intel overclocking insurance and you do have problems, Intel has no way of knowing whether the ram you used was faster than 1600MHz unless you tell them. :sol: 
m
0
l
!