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New Build (i5 3570k GTX 680) Need Some Advice

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  • Intel i5
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October 7, 2012 2:30:47 AM

I'm making the switch from console gaming to PC. Here's the parts I've come up with:

CPU: i5 3570k - $190 (Microcenter)

MOBO: Asus P8Z77-V LK - $145 (Newegg)

GPU: EVGA GTX 680 2GB - $500 (Newegg)

MEMORY: Corsair Vengeance 8GB Low Profile - $42 (Newegg)

OPTICAL DRIVE: Asus 24x DVD Burner - $20 (Newegg)

HARD DRIVE: Western Digital WD Blue 500GB - $70 (Newegg)

SSD: Kingston HyperX 3K 120GB - $94 (Amazon)

PSU: Seasonic M12II 620 Bronze - $90 (Newegg)

OS: Windows 7 - $169 (Amazon) I do not want the OEM version because I don't like the install being tied to one motherboard.

CASE: Cooler Master Storm Enforcer - $85 (Newegg)

CPU COOLER Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo - $31 (Newegg)


TOTAL : $1436

A few questions.

1) Is $1436 a good deal for what I'm getting?

2) The main reason I'm switching to PC is to get better performance and better graphics over console. This rig is roughly four times the cost of an Xbox 360. Will I be getting 4x the performance over an Xbox?

3) How far could I overclock the CPU considering that I'm using Ivy Bridge and air cooling? Is this motherboard good enough for some overclocking.

4) I will be gaming at 1920x1080. Off the top of my head I will be playing Super Monday Night Combat, GTA IV, Assassins Creed 3, Roller Coaster Tycoon 3, Sleeping Dogs, GTA V, Bioshock Infinite, Crysis 2, Portal 2. My goal is to get ~60 fps constant with max settings. Should I have any problems?


Any advice is appreciated. Thanks for reading!

More about : build 3570k gtx 680 advice

October 7, 2012 2:46:50 AM

Get a GTX 670 instead to save $100
October 7, 2012 2:50:36 AM

guerrero said:
Get a GTX 670 instead to save $100


Agreed.
Related resources
October 7, 2012 5:25:04 AM

I was contemplating getting the GTX 670 FTW. Why do you guys recommend the 670 over the 680? Isn't it worth the extra hundred bucks?
October 7, 2012 5:26:38 AM

Howard Banister said:
I was contemplating getting the GTX 670 FTW. Why do you guys recommend the 670 over the 680? Isn't it worth the extra hundred bucks?


The 680 is hardly any faster than the 670 at all and the difference between them will probably shrink as time goes on. Right now, the 680 is, at best, maybe 8% faster despite being 25-45% more expensive and consuming like 15-20% more power.
October 7, 2012 5:42:38 AM

Not to mention, that EVGA 680 is using a reference-design cooler.

You can probably get up to 4.3-4.4 GHz with the 212 EVO.

Judging from the list of games you play, you are better off with a regular 7970 or a 7970 GHz Edition card.
Better performance than the 670 and 680, at a cheaper price and with custom coolers.



October 7, 2012 5:50:13 AM

Be sure that if you go for a 7970, it's not one that has a 7950 using the same cooler. 7950s and 7970s with the same cooler generally have roughly equal overclocking headroom, so if you get a 7970 or 7970 GHz Edition, you'd better get a good one or else you may have wasted your money.
October 7, 2012 6:21:57 AM

The EVGA 670 FTW is very good i wouldn't buy a 680 because you only gaining 5% to 7% and paying $100 more
October 7, 2012 6:38:12 AM

^Performance-wise, yes it's a great. It has bad cooling though(reference).
October 7, 2012 7:06:56 AM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($25.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($149.98 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Samsung 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($44.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Plextor M5S Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($399.98 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer MK III 600W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($69.33 @ NCIX US)
Total: $970.25
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

I would go for this setup instead. This GTX 670 is one of the best and matches a stock GTX 680. Runs cooler and quieter than the crappy reference blowers. You could also go for the Asus DirectCU model which is even quieter.

If you plan on getting your CPU from Microcenter, you might as well pick up a mobo from there too as you get $50 off! The Gigabyte mobo I linked is better than that Asus model. It has more power phases with better mosfets and capacitors which can give you a higher and more stable OC.

The PSU I linked is cheaper and more than enough for one GTX 600 series card. It is made by Seasonic despite the badging.

Get the Plextor M5S at Tigerdirect for only $80! It is better than the HyperX 3K with 5 year warranty. The better option would be to ditch the 128gb and get a 256gb instead.

With the case of your preference and all the other stuff, you should be below your original budget with better performance.
October 7, 2012 7:13:19 AM

ohhgourami said:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($25.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($149.98 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Samsung 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($44.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Plextor M5S Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($399.98 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer MK III 600W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($69.33 @ NCIX US)
Total: $970.25
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

I would go for this setup instead. This GTX 670 is one of the best and matches a stock GTX 680. Runs cooler and quieter than the crappy reference blowers. You could also go for the Asus DirectCU model which is even quieter.

If you plan on getting your CPU from Microcenter, you might as well pick up a mobo from there too as you get $50 off! The Gigabyte mobo I linked is better than that Asus model. It has more power phases with better mosfets and capacitors which can give you a higher and more stable OC.

The PSU I linked is cheaper and more than enough for one GTX 600 series card. It is made by Seasonic despite the badging.

Get the Plextor M5S at Tigerdirect for only $80! It is better than the HyperX 3K with 5 year warranty. The better option would be to ditch the 128gb and get a 256gb instead.

With the case of your preference and all the other stuff, you should be below your original budget with better performance.


How could you recommend a memory kit that has no heat spreaders in a $1000 build?

Also, more power phases doesn't necessarily mean better.
October 7, 2012 7:33:08 AM

He maybe prefers NV guys just let it go we are getting off topic enough is enough already he asked which 680 to get sorry OP to answer your question this is about what you'll get scroll down this link you can see test of games on video http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/hardware-canucks-r...
October 7, 2012 7:39:11 AM
October 7, 2012 7:53:28 AM

luciferano said:
How could you recommend a memory kit that has no heat spreaders in a $1000 build?

Also, more power phases doesn't necessarily mean better.


Would you prefer to recommend ram with a fan kit?? Ram does not need heat spreaders!

More power phases don't necessarily mean better, but it generally does. And since those two mobos are pretty much the same price, I'd go for the one with more power phases, capacitors, and MOSFETs. So what do you think will make a CPU OC better then?
October 7, 2012 8:00:40 AM

ohhgourami said:
Would you prefer to recommend ram with a fan kit?? Ram does not need heat spreaders!

More power phases don't necessarily mean better, but it generally does. And since those two mobos are pretty much the same price, I'd go for the one with more power phases, capacitors, and MOSFETs. So what do you think will make a CPU OC better then?


It doesn't matter if it doesn't need heat spreaders, they should be had because they are very beneficial to longevity. Heatsinks with fans for RAM modules are obviously overkill.

I probably wouldn't get the GB board. They've been slipping in quality control lately.
October 7, 2012 8:12:37 AM

You do know you can get the asus z77 v-lk for $94.99 with the 3570k for $189 if u bundled in microcenter. Just add the motherboard and cpu in the cart. Its a bundle discount. I think thats one of the best advice youll get today.
October 7, 2012 8:29:37 AM

luciferano said:
It doesn't matter if it doesn't need heat spreaders, they should be had because they are very beneficial to longevity. Heatsinks with fans for RAM modules are obviously overkill.

I probably wouldn't get the GB board. They've been slipping in quality control lately.


RAM heatspreaders are entirely cosmetic on DDR3 they serve no real purpose and seriously show some researched evidence that they increase longevity.

Also how about some proof that GByte are slipping as a maker? They are the only mobo brand I know that I have never had issue with.
October 7, 2012 8:36:29 AM

wr6133 said:
RAM heatspreaders are entirely cosmetic on DDR3 they serve no real purpose and seriously show some researched evidence that they increase longevity.

Also how about some proof that GByte are slipping as a maker? They are the only mobo brand I know that I have never had issue with.


They keep the RAM cooler. Over the years, I've noticed a distinct trend even up to this day of RAM with heat sinks being both cooler and a little more reliable than the same RAM without the heat sinks. It's also a known fact that heat is one of a computer components' worst enemies and reducing temps is almost always good for reliability, up to a point.

I look at the market as a whole, not my own experience because one persons experience can vary greatly from another's with the same board. Gigabyte has been having more coil whine issues on their graphics cards and their boards have had their own minor issues. I've noticed a bad trend in Gigabyte boards having components such as NICs and more failing prematurely far more often than boards from a few other brands in the same price ranges, among other more minor issues.

They're not the only ones either. A lot of computer companies have been slipping lately in many different types of products. Only a few such as ASRock have been improving.
October 7, 2012 8:37:55 AM

luciferano said:
It doesn't matter if it doesn't need heat spreaders, they should be had because they are very beneficial to longevity. Heatsinks with fans for RAM modules are obviously overkill.

I probably wouldn't get the GB board. They've been slipping in quality control lately.


With that logic, you better recommend a high end CPU cooler or custom water loops as something like a 212 Evo isn't enough. You better not OC your CPU either...

Ram doesn't get that hot, nor do they need heat spreaders unless increase the voltage A LOT.

I recommended that ram specifically for air coolers to make sure there is a lot of clearance (barely taller than the memory locking mechanism on the mobo). Plus it OCs like crazy. @1.5V I get 9-10-10-27 1T 1866MHZ. Very good performance for the price and it doesn't get hot.

Got proof of QC issues for Gigabyte mobos? From a purely objective standpoint, the Gigabyte mobo looks better on paper.
October 7, 2012 8:47:02 AM

ohhgourami said:
With that logic, you better recommend a high end CPU cooler or custom water loops as something like a 212 Evo isn't enough. You better not OC your CPU either...

Ram doesn't get that hot, nor do they need heat spreaders unless increase the voltage A LOT.

I recommended that ram specifically for air coolers to make sure there is a lot of clearance (barely taller than the memory locking mechanism on the mobo). Plus it OCs like crazy. @1.5V I get 9-10-10-27 1T 1866MHZ. Very good performance for the price and it doesn't get hot.

Got proof of QC issues for Gigabyte mobos? From a purely objective standpoint, the Gigabyte mobo looks better on paper.


That doesn't go along my train of logic at all. It goes completely against it. I specifically went against going overkill on the cooling with those actively cooled heat sinks that were brought up earlier, so I'm obviously not for going overkill in cooling, just getting enough.

RAM doesn't need to get very hot. Just getting somewhat hot decreases longevity. It doesn't need to kill the memory outright, it just hurts it over time. I've known RAM with heat sinks to very consistently outlast RAM without them. That's not always just because of the heat spreaders because RAM with heat spreaders is often designed to be of higher quality than RAM without heat spreaders, but it's still an obvious trend.

There are many low-profile RAM kits with low-profile heat spreaders that don't interfere with CPU coolers.

Everywhere I look, Gigabyte boards currently tend to have far higher rates of failure of individual components on the board than comparable boards except those from really bad brands such as Foxconn. Full failure rate is still nice and low, but that doesn't make up for the poor rates of non-necessary component failure.

I see them failing far too often in reviews from them all over the place. Newegg, Tigerdirect, and more as well as personal experience with the many systems that I've built for other people. You might balk at the lack of professional reviews, but those are irrelevant because of their sample sizes.
October 7, 2012 8:48:29 AM

luciferano said:
They keep the RAM cooler. Over the years, I've noticed a distinct trend even up to this day of RAM with heat sinks being both cooler and a little more reliable than the same RAM without the heat sinks. It's also a known fact that heat is one of a computer components' worst enemies and reducing temps is almost always good for reliability, up to a point.

I look at the market as a whole, not my own experience because one persons experience can vary greatly from another's with the same board. Gigabyte has been having more coil whine issues on their graphics cards and their boards have had their own minor issues. I've noticed a bad trend in Gigabyte boards having components such as NICs and more failing prematurely far more often than boards from a few other brands in the same price ranges, among other more minor issues.

They're not the only ones either. A lot of computer companies have been slipping lately in many different types of products. Only a few such as ASRock have been improving.


1- It has been proven time over time heatspreaders have no real effect on DDR3, early on some were even shown to be bad. Show us proof of this trend you have "seen" and tell us your testing method as if your not blowing smoke like I suspect then you clearly have found something new and exciting.

2 - Prove your trend of failure in Gbyte mobos? How large is your sample size and how did you collect this data? I suspect your blowing more smoke but just incase my habit of always building for people with Gbyte boards (and never having had an issue) is utterly incorrect please enlighten me as to how this upper tier manufacturer is actually a low tier mobo maker.
October 7, 2012 8:54:36 AM

wr6133 said:
1- It has been proven time over time heatspreaders have no real effect on DDR3, early on some were even shown to be bad. Show us proof of this trend you have "seen" and tell us your testing method as if your not blowing smoke like I suspect then you clearly have found something new and exciting.

2 - Prove your trend of failure in Gbyte mobos? How large is your sample size and how did you collect this data? I suspect your blowing more smoke but just incase my habit of always building for people with Gbyte boards (and never having had an issue) is utterly incorrect please enlighten me as to how this upper tier manufacturer is actually a low tier mobo maker.


Read my edit if you care to.

I can't show proof of my experience over the years. It's not like I keep a paper trail of all of this. My testing methods are simple. If the memory fails, then it has failed. When I see this happening for computers that are just running 24/7 doing the same thing such as network servers, not just home computers where usage can vary greatly, it's kinda difficult to deny it. I find that it can strongly depend also on the CPU cooler and case cooling, but it's still a consistent rend, just to less of an extent with good case temps and such.

Using Gigabyte doesn't guarantee problems as I'm sure you already know. It's simply more likely to cause issues with hardware on the boards that is not necessary, such as NIC and such. It's also a very recent trend, I only noticed it with some Z68 and newer chipset boards from Gigabyte.

Failure rates are still lower than success rates, so problems are unlikely, but they're much more likely than with some other boards right now.
October 7, 2012 9:18:07 AM

luciferano said:
Read my edit if you care to.

I can't show proof of my experience over the years. It's not like I keep a paper trail of all of this. My testing methods are simple. If the memory fails, then it has failed. When I see this happening for computers that are just running 24/7 doing the same thing such as network servers, not just home computers where usage can vary greatly, it's kinda difficult to deny it. I find that it can strongly depend also on the CPU cooler and case cooling, but it's still a consistent rend, just to less of an extent with good case temps and such.

Using Gigabyte doesn't guarantee problems as I'm sure you already know. It's simply more likely to cause issues with hardware on the boards that is not necessary, such as NIC and such. It's also a very recent trend, I only noticed it with some Z68 and newer chipset boards from Gigabyte.

Failure rates are still lower than success rates, so problems are unlikely, but they're much more likely than with some other boards right now.


The TLDR of that is your a spamming troll consistently giving out bad/factless/made up/ridiculous advice across threads on this site.

Quote:
It's also a very recent trend, I only noticed it with some Z68 and newer chipset boards from Gigabyte.


If this is true then why are you the only one to notice this? Is the entire review industry and those of us that recommend them bribed by Gbyte or something? Are you the one shining light in the hardware industry with this knowledge?

or

Is it a factless assertion?

Quote:
I can't show proof of my experience over the years. It's not like I keep a paper trail of all of this. My testing methods are simple. If the memory fails, then it has failed.


Earlier you claimed it was shown across identical RAM with and without spreaders that would have meant you would have needed to test that specifically.

Again

Factless assertion

Why am I being a seeming ass with this? We help people here on this site your advice is consistently harmful, harmful advice that influences peoples very expensive decisions. Stop thinking of inflating your post count at what could be the expense of somebodies wallet.
October 7, 2012 9:26:10 AM

wr6133 said:
The TLDR of that is your a spamming troll consistently giving out bad/factless/made up/ridiculous advice across threads on this site.

Quote:
It's also a very recent trend, I only noticed it with some Z68 and newer chipset boards from Gigabyte.


If this is true then why are you the only one to notice this? Is the entire review industry and those of us that recommend them bribed by Gbyte or something? Are you the one shining light in the hardware industry with this knowledge?

or

Is it a factless assertion?

Quote:
I can't show proof of my experience over the years. It's not like I keep a paper trail of all of this. My testing methods are simple. If the memory fails, then it has failed.


Earlier you claimed it was shown across identical RAM with and without spreaders that would have meant you would have needed to test that specifically.

Again

Factless assertion

Why am I being a seeming ass with this? We help people here on this site your advice is consistently harmful, harmful advice that influences peoples very expensive decisions. Stop thinking of inflating your post count at what could be the expense of somebodies wallet.


I'm not the only one who came to this conclusion:
http://forums.afterdawn.com/t.cfm/f-216/the_official_pc...

I'm not making anything up. You have absolutely no more proof than I presented, so I can say that you're making it up and be no less justified than you are. Of course, instead of being rational about it, you go into a blind rage and make exceptionally accusatory claims over a mere disagreement.

I've used memory kits with and without heat spreaders, some of which were the same memory, just with or without heat spreaders. I've also used multiple kits of the same type both with and without heat spreaders for models that I particularly liked. You're the one making assumptions without any facts.
October 7, 2012 11:10:49 AM

If I may give my insight- I've never really found a use for the heat spreaders, and have never encountered any problems with low profile modules, nor any of my friends.

I actually just give low profile RAM on the build suggestions I give around this part of the forums by default to avoid any conflict whatsoever it may cause(i.e CPU coolers).

This was apparently discussed on Techspot as well.

http://www.techspot.com/community/topics/ram-heatspread...

In any case, it's not that big of a deal and we're getting off-topic.
October 7, 2012 11:30:50 AM

luciferano said:

I can't show proof of my experience over the years. It's not like I keep a paper trail of all of this. My testing methods are simple. If the memory fails, then it has failed. When I see this happening for computers that are just running 24/7 doing the same thing such as network servers, not just home computers where usage can vary greatly, it's kinda difficult to deny it.


Also you may want to know that practically all server memory does not have heatspreaders so you seeing network servers doing better with heatspreaders on the RAM is most likely a figment of your imagination.

Quote:

I'm not the only one who came to this conclusion:
http://forums.afterdawn.com/t.cfm/ [...] 867265/215


What does that link to a forum have to do with heatspreaders on DDR3 RAM?

Quote:
I've used memory kits with and without heat spreaders, some of which were the same memory, just with or without heat spreaders. I've also used multiple kits of the same type both with and without heat spreaders for models that I particularly liked. You're the one making assumptions without any facts.


And you know these modules were 100% identical because...... you dont you just decided they were... you have any idea how many variables can effect 2 seemingly identical sticks?

Quote:
I'm not making anything up. You have absolutely no more proof than I presented, so I can say that you're making it up and be no less justified than you are. Of course, instead of being rational about it, you go into a blind rage and make exceptionally accusatory claims over a mere disagreement.


You present no basis for your claims and it largely goes directly against whats been long proven or accepted across the industry, therefore you are making it up your an unreliable source, your 1 attempt to cite a source is an unrelated forum. I'm being rational you on the other hand have to minutely edit your posts or steer the subject in another direction when you can't back up your ridiculous idiotic incorrect made up claims.

Like i said your crap advice is impacting peoples expensive consumer choices this is why I'm jumping down your throat.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

OP I would say the build ohhgourmai listed for you is worthwhile
October 7, 2012 11:38:20 AM

wr6133 said:
Also you may want to know that practically all server memory does not have heatspreaders so you seeing network servers doing better with heatspreaders on the RAM is most likely a figment of your imagination.

What does that link to a forum have to do with heatspreaders on DDR3 RAM?

And you know these modules were 100% identical because...... you dont you just decided they were... you have any idea how many variables can effect 2 seemingly identical sticks?

You present no basis for your claims and it largely goes directly against whats been long proven or accepted across the industry, therefore you are making it up your an unreliable source, your 1 attempt to cite a source is an unrelated forum. I'm being rational you on the other hand have to minutely edit your posts or steer the subject in another direction when you can't back up your ridiculous idiotic incorrect made up claims.

Like i said your crap advice is impacting peoples expensive consumer choices this is why I'm jumping down your throat.


The link was to show other people who came to the same conclusion about Gigabyte boards.

When you take two modules from the same kit and throw a decent low profile heat spreader on one of them and it lasts about year longer in the same usage, then you go on to have similarly consistent results in your other builds, the pattern gets difficult to ignore. Youcan't get much more identical than two modules in the same kit.

I have a very solid basis. You simply disagree with it. That's not the same as not having a basis.

Me saying that someone should get a kit that has heat spreaders because I've seen that consistently be considerably more reliable is not crap advice. Even if you don't agree with it, it's hardly changing any pricing on the memory at all, so it's more than worth it to be safe.

You are not being rational at all. You're mocking me just because you disagree with me. That's not being rational.

I edit typos and mistakes. There's nothing wrong with that. That's why we have an edit function in forums such as this.
October 7, 2012 11:46:20 AM

You make things up you claim earlier servers use RAM heatspreaders.... go look up some server RAM its nearly always naked. Your as credible as the syrian ministry of propoganda.


luciferano said:
The link was to show other people who came to the same conclusion about Gigabyte boards.

When you take two modules from the same kit and throw a decent low profile heat spreader on one of them and it lasts about year longer in the same usage, then you go on to have similarly consistent results in your other builds, the pattern gets difficult to ignore. Youcan't get much more identical than two modules in the same kit.

I have a very solid basis. You simply disagree with it. That's not the same as not having a basis.


You seriously telling me you have built a number of machines across the past years then added a LP heatspreader to 1 of the 2 modules, you have then monitored these builds over the years to come to this conclusion? You haven't have you....... your claims are now simply getting more and more ridiculous.

October 7, 2012 11:51:39 AM

wr6133 said:
You make things up you claim earlier servers use RAM heatspreaders.... go look up some server RAM its nearly always naked. Your as credible as the syrian ministry of propoganda.




You seriously telling me you have built a number of machines across the past years then added a LP heatspreader to 1 of the 2 modules, you have then monitored these builds over the years to come to this conclusion? You haven't have you....... your claims are now simply getting more and more ridiculous.


I never claimed that servers usually use RAM with heat sinks, so please stop with that BS right there.

I don't have to do much monitoring beyond keeping the systems running. It's not like you need to watch the memory. When it fails, it's kinda obvious because the whole computer crashes too.

Yes, I've literally bought kits that had no head spreaders and for separate machines, I've thrown some of my own heat spreaders on some of the modules even from the same kit. I'd often buy kits of many modules in case of a failure so that I can simply grab some from other computers and throw it in as necessary with as close to a guarantee that I could get of it working. It's called being prepared.
October 7, 2012 11:59:31 AM

luciferano said:
I never claimed that servers usually use RAM with heat sinks, so please stop with that BS right there.


Really? So what was the point in this?

luciferano said:
If the memory fails, then it has failed. When I see this happening for computers that are just running 24/7 doing the same thing such as network servers, not just home computers where usage can vary greatly, it's kinda difficult to deny it.


The more you invent facts/lie the dumber you sound

Your beyond words so I'll leave you with this

October 7, 2012 12:10:24 PM

wr6133 said:
Really? So what was the point in this?



The more you invent facts/lie the dumber you sound

Your beyond words so I'll leave you with this

http://i1249.photobucket.com/albums/hh504/wr6133/comical.jpg


I said that I've used them that way, not that it's the norm. A little reading comprehension would go a long way for you. I never said that DDR3 memory needs heat spreaders, I said that they're beneficial. You disagree. That's your opinion. We're all entitled to opinions. You are not entitled to forcing yours on others and mocking them for theirs.
October 7, 2012 12:14:29 PM

So we've concluded that:

1. luciferano = heat spreader lover
2. luciferano = Gigabyte hater
October 7, 2012 12:18:03 PM

boyabunda said:
So we've concluded that:

1. luciferano = heat spreader lover
2. luciferano = Gigabyte hater


I've seen that heat spreaders help. If you have a problem with that, deal with it.
I said that Gigabyte has been slipping lately, not that I hate them. Again, if you don't like that, then deal with it.
October 7, 2012 12:22:03 PM

boyabunda said:
So we've concluded that:

1. luciferano = heat spreader lover
2. luciferano = Gigabyte hater
:lol:  wtf has happen to this thread
October 7, 2012 12:25:03 PM

bigcyco1 said:
:lol:  wtf has happen to this thread


Some people seem to think that their opinions must be absolutely true and anyone who disagrees is an idiot even if they present evidence and reasoning whereas the others do not. Got way off track because of that.
October 7, 2012 12:38:10 PM

luciferano said:
Some people seem to think that their opinions must be absolutely true and anyone who disagrees is an idiot even if they present evidence and reasoning whereas the others do not. Got way off track because of that.


Sorry where is your evidence? You are not a credible source so your "observations" that are hard to believe anyway, in the way you claim to have made them, are not valid in the slightest.

Your the guy that argued in another thread newegg reviews to be more accurate than johnny guru for gauging the quality of a PSU I think thats enough said.

Quote:
So we've concluded that:

1. luciferano = heat spreader lover
2. luciferano = Gigabyte hater


3. Luciferano = Makes up tests he has done in place of providing reliable accepted data.

Quote:
wtf has happen to this thread


I dont like derailing this massivley but this nugget keeps providing advice thats just bad or not based on any fact. That needs to be highlighted when its addressed at people about to spend ALOT of money on new machines based on advice taken here.
October 7, 2012 12:39:41 PM

wr6133 said:
Sorry where is your evidence? You are not a credible source so your "observations" that are hard to believe anyway, in the way you claim to have made them, are not valid in the slightest.

Your the guy that argued in another thread newegg reviews to be more accurate than johnny guru for gauging the quality of a PSU I think thats enough said.

Quote:
So we've concluded that:

1. luciferano = heat spreader lover
2. luciferano = Gigabyte hater


3. Luciferano = Makes up tests he has done in place of providing reliable accepted data.

Quote:
wtf has happen to this thread


I dont like derailing this massivley but this nugget keeps providing advice thats just bad or not based on any fact. That needs to be highlighted when its addressed at people about to spend ALOT of money on new machines based on advice taken here.


You're taking what I've said completely out of context. I said that you can't really use Johnnyguru to gauge failure rates because they only test one unit and for a short duration of time. That's completely accurate.

My observations are hard for you to believe because they go against what you want to believe and for no other reason.

I provided facts for you like it or not, I showed that OCZ has higher failure rates and it's just common sense that keeping electronics cooled helps them keep temps down which improves longevity. I explained what I thought of Gigabyte and simply pulling up reviews would show it. You have your opinions, but mine aren't less valid just because they don't work with yours.
October 7, 2012 12:43:03 PM

Yeah, I'd like it if he/she would just drop it since he/she is no more intent on proving me wrong than I am on providing more information and evidence.
October 7, 2012 12:43:12 PM

fellows life is to short to sweat the small stuff just ignore one another why waste your time with each other it's not worth it.
October 7, 2012 12:49:20 PM

Here we go again the OP was asking best components for a new build not the merits of good manufacturer or the value of heat spreaders , but i will throw my oar in heat spreaders really don't have much value but do help one protect the ics from static discharge look nicer than green pcbs genric budget ram but take corsair there higher end ram has always had heatsinks that are custom designed that do help on overclocking & cooling and have other features not like most other ram makers just clip on a simple bit of metal and market it as a game changer i have noticed the trend over the last 10 years as the hardware market has shrunk that quality control has become less of an concern to them they certainly don't care if some bad components shift as we dont have much choice these days and most of them are just the same companies all using brand names :S

So here my list basically a clone of the pc i now have nou

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/jAHO
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/jAHO/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/jAHO/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Arctic Cooling ACFZI30 74.0 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair XMS3 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($72.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($88.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 64GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($78.48 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 660 Ti 2GB Video Card ($284.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Antec EarthWatts Green 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($82.80 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1083.20
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

very fast very quiet and very stylish pc that wen you overclock will give you plenty bang for your buck hope the advice helps
October 7, 2012 12:49:49 PM

Quote:
RAM heatspreaders are entirely cosmetic on DDR3 they serve no real purpose and seriously show some researched evidence that they increase longevity.

Also how about some proof that GByte are slipping as a maker? They are the only mobo brand I know that I have never had issue with.


I tried keeping it short and sweet there's my 1st post I simply want luciferno to answer those with actual evidence to back his claims (that means researched reliable data)

If he can't then he simply shouldn't be trying to dispense what i believe is BAD advice and its BAD advice until he can do the above.

And Newegg reviews do not ever constitute researched reliable data if that needs explaining he should really really not be here.
October 7, 2012 6:56:59 PM

wr6133 said:
Quote:
RAM heatspreaders are entirely cosmetic on DDR3 they serve no real purpose and seriously show some researched evidence that they increase longevity.

Also how about some proof that GByte are slipping as a maker? They are the only mobo brand I know that I have never had issue with.


I tried keeping it short and sweet there's my 1st post I simply want luciferno to answer those with actual evidence to back his claims (that means researched reliable data)

If he can't then he simply shouldn't be trying to dispense what i believe is BAD advice and its BAD advice until he can do the above.

And Newegg reviews do not ever constitute researched reliable data if that needs explaining he should really really not be here.


I want you to show me such data proving me wrong. I don't need to show data to show that keeping electronics cool improves its longevity. This is a proven fact of pretty much all electronics (within limits that vary between different electronics, of course). Show me where heat sinks make things worse.

It's not bad advice, you simply disagree with it. That's like saying that recommending a Radeon 7870 over a GTX 660 or the other way around is bad advice if its not the way that you agree with.

Newegg reviews can show a rough approximation of failure rates. It doesn't take professional reviewers to say that your PSU or your memory or anything else died.
October 7, 2012 7:00:31 PM

gumbi said:
Here we go again the OP was asking best components for a new build not the merits of good manufacturer or the value of heat spreaders , but i will throw my oar in heat spreaders really don't have much value but do help one protect the ics from static discharge look nicer than green pcbs genric budget ram but take corsair there higher end ram has always had heatsinks that are custom designed that do help on overclocking & cooling and have other features not like most other ram makers just clip on a simple bit of metal and market it as a game changer i have noticed the trend over the last 10 years as the hardware market has shrunk that quality control has become less of an concern to them they certainly don't care if some bad components shift as we dont have much choice these days and most of them are just the same companies all using brand names :S

So here my list basically a clone of the pc i now have nou

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/jAHO
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/jAHO/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/jAHO/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Arctic Cooling ACFZI30 74.0 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair XMS3 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($72.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($88.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 64GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($78.48 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 660 Ti 2GB Video Card ($284.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Antec EarthWatts Green 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($82.80 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1083.20
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

very fast very quiet and very stylish pc that wen you overclock will give you plenty bang for your buck hope the advice helps


The 660 Ti is kinda wasteful. The much cheaper and lower power consumption 660 performs very similarly and there are 670s that are only somewhat more expensive for a great performance boost, especially in minimum frame rates. Even if we leave out that the 7950 is a far better card, the 660 Ti is less than ideal. Otherwise, it's a good build, although I'd shy away from Samsung hard drives nowadays. They sold out to Seagate and their failure rates have gone up since then on many of their consumer models.
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