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How is A10-6800k Richland going to be compatiable.

Ok so i bought my motherboard ahead of time for a new build of mine, it is the Asrock FM2A75 Pro4-M, I am planning to buy a A10-6800k apu in the richland series coming march 19th, to go with my mobo,but will I have to updated the bios for the Richland to work, and if so how am i going to flash the bios if i dont have a workable cpu to turn it on?
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More about 6800k richland compatiable
  1. Best thing to do is to return the mobo.

    The BIOS contains list of compatible APUs. If the Richland APU is not listed in the APU, then chances are the PC will not boot up. You will need to install a Trinity APU in order to flash the BIOS so that you can use the Richland APU.

    You can try and call Asrock to find out if a BIOS flash is necessary. I believe you will need to flash the BIOS though.
  2. jaguarskx said:
    Best thing to do is to return the mobo.

    The BIOS contains list of compatible APUs. If the Richland APU is not listed in the APU, then chances are the PC will not boot up. You will need to install a Trinity APU in order to flash the BIOS so that you can use the Richland APU.

    You can try and call Asrock to find out if a BIOS flash is necessary. I believe you will need to flash the BIOS though.


    So would it be easier to return the motherboard and re buy one that is richland compatiable or but like a A4 trinity and then update the bios then return the A4?
  3. It's easier to simply return the mobo especially if you did not open it. However, you generally have a short window of time where you are allowed to return an unopened item w/o having to pay a restocking fee. Check the retailer's website for that info. You might be able to use that time to contact Asrock regarding compatibility.

    Returning a used A4 APU will mean you need to pay a 15% restocking fee.
  4. Yes, return the motherboard. It could take weeks or months before the manufacturer releases a bios update to make the Richland APU compatible.

    However, I'm curious why you think you can't download a new bios update? Are you not using a computer to log onto Tom's to post this on the forums? If you can get online you can download the bios (if there was one available).
  5. ^^^

    It's likely he's using an existing PC that is not built around socket FM2 and he wants to build a replacement PC.
  6. ^^^
    Then he has the ability to download the bios update and put it on a USB drive to flash it onto the A75 motherboard. There's nothing stopping him from doing this.
  7. But he needs a CPU in the mobo in order to flash the BIOS.
  8. You need to have the CPU and memory installed; however, the motherboard will still POST even if the bios doesn't support the CPU. It just won't load the OS and proceed past this point. If after post you enter bios, you can set to boot from USB where you have the bios update loaded.

    There you can install the new bios update, save and exit and reboot. Make sure the USB stick is removed prior to rebooting.

    I always have boot order set to CD-ROM, USB, HDD, but you can set it to USB, CD-ROM, HDD, etc.

    In case you're wondering, here's a great link to updating a bios via USB.
    http://www.biosflash.de/e/bios-update-howto.htm
  9. The other dude was right I am building a FM2 computer using a existing, but I didn't know you could go to the bios without a working CPU, so you are saying I can go into the bios and flash it without having a trintity CPU?
  10. Btw some other dude was saying that AMD had a plug and play with there CPUs were there was not a need to update, you can still use it.
  11. MrAcd said:
    Btw some other dude was saying that AMD had a plug and play with there CPUs were there was not a need to update, you can still use it.

    The problem is you're playing with fire. You may get burned, or you may master the fire. Either way, you're in for more hassle than it's worth. I too have a new computer build in mind, but the components I'm willing to buy in advance are the case, PS, blu-ray drive. These are essential components, but can be universally used in any computer build.
  12. Asrock told me they would send me a new bios chip when it gets updated and I need to replace it with the actual bios chip on the mobo. Is that safe and all and is it easy, and I am still in 30 days of return, I can return it but I will lose my deal on the mobo I got. Somebody please help.
  13. MrAcd said:
    Asrock told me they would send me a new bios chip when it gets updated and I need to replace it with the actual bios chip on the mobo. Is that safe and all and is it easy, and I am still in 30 days of return, I can return it but I will lose my deal on the mobo I got. Somebody please help.

    I've never heard of swapping out a bios chip. They're almost always soldered on the mobo. But if you're handy with a solder and don't mind voiding the warranty on a brand new mobo, and making it impossible to return the mobo to the manufacturer, then by all means, go for it. Deals will come and go ALL THE TIME. But if you mess up that mobo, you lose out entirely and have to buy another one. Then you're out even more money than the 15% restocking fee. Something to think about.
  14. Best answer
    MrAcd said:
    Asrock told me they would send me a new bios chip when it gets updated and I need to replace it with the actual bios chip on the mobo. Is that safe and all and is it easy, and I am still in 30 days of return, I can return it but I will lose my deal on the mobo I got. Somebody please help.


    Yes, the bios chip in the ASRock mobos comes right out and can be replaced easily. If you already have the board you can take a look at the bios chip, it should be in the lower right hand part of the board, you can see it is easy to replace.
  15. So it is sottered to the board and I do see it , have you
    Done it before....so you are telling me I just get a tool and pop it off then replace it with the new chip, that easy?
  16. Ok, if it is soldered to the board I wouldn't mess with it. I was looking at the photo of your motherboard and it appeared to be same as my asrock mobo where it can be removed by hand.
  17. tonync_01 said:
    Ok, if it is soldered to the board I wouldn't mess with it. I was looking at the photo of your motherboard and it appeared to be same as my asrock mobo where it can be removed by hand.

    If the bios chip can be swapped out easily you might just be in luck.
  18. Thank you to the people that replied, I will just swap them out then.
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