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Help with a new build for photo editing, internet (no gaming)

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  • New Build
  • Photo
  • Computer
  • Internet
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
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October 9, 2012 1:11:09 PM

I would like some help on what parts to buy for a home computer just to do some home movie and photo editing. Other than that, I use the internet and office programs. Not much else.

I built a few computers many years ago, and I think I can do it again. I'm just not up to date on all the new parts available. I want a nice one that will last me. The computer I'm on is my old Dell that is 8 years old. I don't like change, so I'll probably be satisfied with whatever I build for a long time. Here is a list of some things I'm thinking about. Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/jOuV

Thanks!

More about : build photo editing internet gaming

October 9, 2012 4:03:25 PM

mshomo said:
I would like some help on what parts to buy for a home computer just to do some home movie and photo editing. Other than that, I use the internet and office programs. Not much else.

I built a few computers many years ago, and I think I can do it again. I'm just not up to date on all the new parts available. I want a nice one that will last me. The computer I'm on is my old Dell that is 8 years old. I don't like change, so I'll probably be satisfied with whatever I build for a long time. Here is a list of some things I'm thinking about. Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/jOuV

Thanks!

I suggest getting a 1-1.5 TB hard drive, because if you plan on dong VIDEO editing, videos take up A LOT. of memory. You probably won't need a 3570k if you don't plan on gaming. You can get away spending a little less on the case. I suggest the HAF 912 (Just search HAF 912 on newegg, it'll pop right up).
ALSO. You MIGHT be able to get away with a slightly cheaper MOBO, But it's a stretch.
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October 9, 2012 7:04:04 PM

Certainly would suggest a larger hard drive, ideally something like WD Caviar Black. The rest depends on how serious you want to get with photographic work. If it's just a casual hobby, set-up is fine. If you want to do something more substantial to a professional standard, using something like Adobe CS6, AND don't want any real gaming, you should be thinking of i7 processor, and possibly Quadro graphics (it doesn't have to be a ridiculously expensive one)
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October 9, 2012 7:22:11 PM

It's a nice build but I would google this

"ASRock Z77 Extreme4 VRM overheat"

Then consider a board made by ASUS or Gigabyte.

If your using an SSD for your OS then consider a larger storage drive from the various "green" ranges, they are slower but that ok for storage and they are often cheaper than their 7200rpm counterparts.
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October 9, 2012 8:16:08 PM

The Asrock E 4 is what it is, a cheap, well featured board. It's using fairly basic technology, which, judging by posts on that VRM theme, struggle with high CPU wattages. Personally, for quality and reliability, important for photo work, my choice would be Asus P8Z77-V Pro, but it doesn't come cheap. The "best" options, really depend on what OP is looking for, in terms of the level of photo work.
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October 9, 2012 8:28:02 PM

malbluff said:
The Asrock E 4 is what it is, a cheap, well featured board. It's using fairly basic technology, which, judging by posts on that VRM theme, struggle with high CPU wattages. Personally, for quality and reliability, important for photo work, my choice would be Asus P8Z77-V Pro, but it doesn't come cheap. The "best" options, really depend on what OP is looking for, in terms of the level of photo work.


My issue with it is it's marketed and often touted in forums as some amazing value super tier 1 board..... it's not and you can do better for not a significant amount more. Features don't equal quality, infact features without the corresponding price hike often indicate a lack of quality. For a mobo I would rather solid quality to bells and whistles. A big part of getting an K series CPU is the fact that you can OC it maybe not straight away but in the future to prolong its life as it begins to show its teeth so here is yet more reason not to get a mobo with a possible question mark over its ability in this area.
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October 9, 2012 10:32:54 PM

Certainly agree it does tend to be recommended as the "go to" card, for features, on a budget. The point, of course, is that the same features, on Gigabyte, or Asus, basically cost $50 more. Personally, I think that's money quite well spent, but not everyone would agree, for those on a tight budget.
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October 10, 2012 12:35:02 AM

My photo editing is just a casual hobby and I won't be playing games at all. So, if I'm not over-clocking should I not get the "k" version of the CPU? Do I need a CPU cooler if I don't over-clock? As far as a MB I am open to any suggestions. I just want one that is easy to set up and will allow me to make use of the usb ports on the case. I think you are probably right on the hard drive and I will look into a bigger drive for storage. Thanks for the replies.
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October 10, 2012 9:41:22 AM

If you definitely don't want to overclock, get one of the non "K" processors, and a good quality H77 mobo to go with it. Assuming you won't want to add a 2nd graphics card, in the future, any H77 will do, although I recommend you check out Asus' P8H77 range, on their website, for one that has any particular features, you may want.
If not overclocking CPU, you don't need aftermarket cooler, although sometimes it is still good to fit one, as they tend to be a lot quieter than the stock fan, supplied with CPU. If you don't require real quiet, don't bother.
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