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My sick gaming monster (ok gaming zergling) - Feedback please

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October 9, 2012 3:41:15 PM

Hi community

After 10 years of notebook gaming torture I am ready to get a real system again. I have put together some components. I was wondering if any of you had suggestions. Although I am a programmer, I don't know much about hardware so I've just been clicking random stuff together :) 

Two main usages of the system are:
- Programming Web/Sharepoint or Windows Apps, local and with Windows Server inside a VM
- StarCraft 2, Diablo 3, Anno 2070, Dota 2, Skyrim, ... :pt1cable: 

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/jP7a

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard
Memory: Kingston 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory
Memory: Kingston 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Green 3TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case
Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 650W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer
Keyboard: Das Keyboard DASK3ULTMS1 Wired Standard Keyboard
Mouse: Razer DeathAdder Wired Optical Mouse

Total: $1650.05

Btw. the motherboard is the part that I am most unsure of, since there are gaming configurations with the X79 mainboards. As far as I can see they have no Ivy Bridge though? I'm quite confused. Whats the best Ivy Bridge Board I can get. I really don't want to save on the essential parts.


Cheers
a b B Homebuilt system
October 9, 2012 3:54:21 PM

I would go with an i5 quad like the ivy bridge 3750k or the sandy bridge 2500k over the i7 quad. Unless you wanted to jump up to a 6 core i7 i do not see any point in jumping up to an i7 quad when an i5 quad is just as good if not better in most circumstances.
October 9, 2012 4:04:02 PM

zolton33 said:
I would go with an i5 quad like the ivy bridge 3750k or the sandy bridge 2500k over the i7 quad. Unless you wanted to jump up to a 6 core i7 i do not see any point in jumping up to an i7 quad when an i5 quad is just as good if not better in most circumstances.



Wait a second. Isn't i7 supposed to be better than i5? At least it is more expensive. As I said I am not very familiar with hardware, but I was pretty convinced that i7 > i5

*confused*
Related resources
October 9, 2012 4:06:37 PM

zolton33 said:
I would go with an i5 quad like the ivy bridge 3750k or the sandy bridge 2500k over the i7 quad. Unless you wanted to jump up to a 6 core i7 i do not see any point in jumping up to an i7 quad when an i5 quad is just as good if not better in most circumstances.


Quote:

Two main usages of the system are:
- Programming Web/Sharepoint or Windows Apps, local and with Windows Server inside a VM


That would be why he wants an i7

You've made quite a little beast of a build there I'd change the motherboard though

to one of these

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

If you dont plan on extreme overclocks a coolermaster 212 evo cooler would save some $ and be sufficent for normal overclocking.
October 9, 2012 4:08:32 PM

I agree with zolton, unless you are doing any video editing, an i5 is the way to go for gaming. But basically, the build you have here is the classic $1500 build that most of us suggest to new users.

If I had to make some critiques, you could spring for a 7970 Ghz edition, for an extra $60 bucks, also, you could buy 4X4GB sticks of RAM for faster memory speeds. But basically you have a great build there.

I am a big aesthetics guy, so I have a couple of peripheral suggestions in that area but nothing that needs to be changed :D 

1. Instead of a fractal case, go for an NZXT Switch 810 case. Fantastic case, and just look very good in my opinion. Then again... my opinion :) .

2. Das Keyboard = ******* awesome! Great choice! If you want a keyboard with backlighting, spring for a Max Nighthawk X9 or X8. I can't recall if Das uses Costar or Cherry stabilizers, but if you are going to be doing programming, definitely get the costar stabilizers. It's a tiny thing but it makes a world of difference in feel.

3. If you are a serious gamer, get a Steel Series Sensei or a Mionix Naos 5000. Easily the best mice for advanced gamers on the market right now. The Deathadder is an entry level mouse, and doesn't have the durability or features of either the Sensei or Naos. If you are looking for a midrange mouse, grab a Logitech G500 or a Corsair M60

Other than the peripherals, your computer looks great! Have fun building it!

Edit: Oh yea get a Hyper 212 Evo. Performs almost as good as the D-14 for a third of the price!
October 9, 2012 4:08:56 PM

mint-ch said:
Wait a second. Isn't i7 supposed to be better than i5? At least it is more expensive. As I said I am not very familiar with hardware, but I was pretty convinced that i7 > i5

*confused*


The i7 is simply the quadcore i5 with hyperthreading (fake cores) and some extra L3 cache. For gaming the i7 is not worth the extra spend its more for people needing to multitask heavily or render/edit alot (basically things that multi thread well).
a b B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
October 9, 2012 4:11:10 PM

the i7 will be much better at those virtual machines. you however, have teh 3770, not the 3770K. if you don't plan to overclock or SLI, you can save a lot going to a B75 or H77 motherboard, drop the cooler and keep the 3770. Or you can spend a few bucks more to get teh 3770K and overclock, the AS Rock Z77 Extreme 4 is an excellent motherboard including any reasonable overclocks
a b B Homebuilt system
October 9, 2012 4:18:12 PM

wr6133 said:
Quote:

Two main usages of the system are:
- Programming Web/Sharepoint or Windows Apps, local and with Windows Server inside a VM


That would be why he wants an i7

You've made quite a little beast of a build there I'd change the motherboard though

to one of these

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

If you dont plan on extreme overclocks a coolermaster 212 evo cooler would save some $ and be sufficent for normal overclocking.



I just read he wants to run a server on his vm. For that wouldn't it be best to bump them up to a Intel Core i7-3930K 6 core if they could afford it? I can imagine the bog down of the server in vm and them trying to do much of anything else while that is running. But we never got a full budget on what he has to work with so i do not know. Never messed with servers and such but do understand the load can be high.
October 9, 2012 4:32:32 PM

wow, all those responses. This forum rocks.

I forgot to name a budget. I am flexible on the price, but what I want to spend is more or less what I've used for this build. Now 100 bucks more or less won't make a big difference, as long as the upgrade makes sense.

As for the VMs: Since I am not going to code much longer for Sharepoint, the VM's are not that important. However I do want fast compile times and some horsepower for local development. I suppose i7 quad core will suit me well? Or would a 6core upgrade still be reasonable? I haven't even found 6core at my supplier so I am guessing its somewhat expensive.

Just bear in mind: I have been working all these years doing VM development with notebooks. Currently with a MacBook Pro Mid 2010 with 2.66GHz Intel Core i7 processor with 4MB shared L3 cache. So I guess anything desktop will perform much better, haha.
October 9, 2012 4:34:31 PM

I dont think in your case the 6 core is worth it the extra cost would be ALOT for a socket 2011 motherboard and a sandybridge extreme CPU as you survived on a laptop something tells me you dont need that extra grunt and a normal i7 is plenty
October 9, 2012 10:38:12 PM

6-core shouldnt really have even come up. But basically, its all up to what you want to spend. In my opinion, an i5-3570k competes with an i7-3770k very strongly in gaming and strong in multitasking. If you want to buy an i7 to say you have an i7 and for that extra minute saved compiling code, then do it. But I can guarantee there is no difference in gaming and everyday activities.
October 9, 2012 11:10:06 PM

if you think you will need the extra CPU horsepower go i7-3770K but you may get by with the i5-3570K. as for Motherboards i would go with a "Premium" Brand like Asus, Gigabyte or MSI due long track records of reliable from them. ASRock is only just come the top of line table with the Z77 Extreme4
October 10, 2012 3:10:31 AM

ASRock is actually an off shoot of ASUS, so don't let brand name stop you from buying it. It's one of (if not the) best 1155 mobos right now, and its there for a reason.
October 10, 2012 7:23:46 AM

Dupontrocks11 said:
ASRock is actually an off shoot of ASUS, so don't let brand name stop you from buying it. It's one of (if not the) best 1155 mobos right now, and its there for a reason.


Actually ASRock started as a budget arm of ASUS it's now independent but not a top tier maker. The extreme 4 is not anywhere near one of the best 1155 mobo's right now (ASUS Maximus V, Gbyte Sniper are among the best with prices to match), it's simply well featured for its price however the trade off is it uses poor quality mofsets that can cause the VRM's to overheat. Features don't equal quality infact getting alot of features for a seemingly low price with a mobo indicates corners were cut elsewhere. Unfortunately reviewers dont lift the sinks and check the mofsets when they review or run their OC's for long enough to see if the board actually has issues. Read this http://www.overclock.net/t/1271002/asrock-z77-vrm-phase... it may not be conclusive but I would say its enough of a question mark over the board that to recommened it over other makers isn't the best idea
a b B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
October 10, 2012 8:28:41 AM

If i were you i would change the CPU , GPU , PSU , Mobo.

CPU : Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo).
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GPU : XFX Double D Radeon HD 7970 3GB 384-bit GDDR5.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

PSU : XFX PRO 750W 80 Plus Silver certified.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-Z77X-UD5H-WB LGA 1155.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

the i7 is pointless , and i am totally agree with wr6133 about the motherboard quality.

◘ GOOD LUCK ◘
;) 
October 10, 2012 11:21:38 AM

Hello Folks

First of all thank you very much for all your advice. I was stunned how many helpful responses came in that quickly.

I've made some adjustments to my config:

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard

Also I removed the Noctua CPU Cooler, because apparently the CPU comes with a cooler already. Or should I spend the extra 71€ for that premium cooler?

I figured that I want the i7 for the programming side of things. I understand that for gaming it won't help (i guess it won't hurt either), but since I make a living as a programmer and not as a progamer, that side is just as important. Also I didn't quite see the advantage of the Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H WB over the one that I picked. The UD3H seems to have even more USB 3.0 connectors.

The new config can be seen here:

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/jUva

Is there anything else?
October 10, 2012 11:28:44 AM

Build looks good. On the CPU cooler topic while you dont need an aftermarket one unless/until you plan to overclock Ivybridge CPU's do run hot and the intel stock cooler is poo to say the least. so I would recommend getting one just maybe not the expensive noctua (thats more for people going for aggresive overclocks) I use this as do many others, it's cheap and does the job well enough even if you want to overclock

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Maybe the programmer will become a progamer? As surely progaming is more fun than programming.
a b B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
October 10, 2012 11:56:16 AM

just keep in mind that we advised you to save your money for going to the 3570k , and buy the HD 7970 :) 
October 10, 2012 12:14:56 PM

wr6133 said:
Build looks good. On the CPU cooler topic while you dont need an aftermarket one unless/until you plan to overclock Ivybridge CPU's do run hot and the intel stock cooler is poo to say the least.


Allright I get it. Aftermarket for overclocking. I was planning to ask about that, because I heard alot about it (even with GPU's) but never really bothered to look into it. Is that something that is worthwile? Or does it come with risks. I suppose if the CPU was built to run faster, they would just make it run faster wouldn't they?

wr6133 said:

Maybe the programmer will become a progamer? As surely progaming is more fun than programming.


Can't say I didn't dream of that, hehe. But I am 27 already and nowhere near beeing good at gaming so, I think that train has left the station a long time ago. Also I would rather like to run a successful business than just gaming 12 hours a day doing nothing else. It's still nice to dream about it and try to improve.

mrdowntownkiller said:
just keep in mind that we advised you to save your money for going to the 3570k , and buy the HD 7970 :) 


Yes I have seen that. As I just said, I want the i7 for programming, compiling, running VMs and stuff. It is my profession so I can spend some extra bucks on good tools. About the grapics card, I made up my mind about the ASUS since i read good tests about it. Also some Radeon chip wouldn't let me play Gothic 1 (all time favorite game) a few years back so I'm resilient to them. (this is oviously based on emotion, not reason ;) 



One more question: Will I be able to run 3 monitors with the Asus GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card? Not talking about playing Battlefield on 3 monitors, just normal Windows 8 stuff with mails on one monitor, VS on another and maybe Chrome on the third. Does the card support that?


Cheerio
October 10, 2012 12:20:27 PM

Triple monitor will be fine, gaming maybe a stretch, for normal uses it will be plenty.

Overclocking is easy and pretty risk free (unless you try for crazy speeds) it's not something you would need to do right away but the option to in future is good as it can prolong the rigs life.

I'm with you on Nvidia in this I am a total fanboy would take ALOT to make me buy anything else.
a b B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
October 10, 2012 12:40:10 PM

2766775,19,1428602GPU's)






About the grapics card, I made up my mind about the ASUS since i read good tests about it. Also some Radeon chip wouldn't let me play Gothic 1 (all time favorite game) a few years back so I'm resilient to them. (this is oviously based on emotion, not reason ;)




Cheerio[/quotemsg said:

you sound like you are nvidia guy like me , i was sad anyway recommending to you the radeon 7970 :D  , but it is the fact it is much better than 670 , but go with any thing you will feel comfort with , GooD LuCK :) 
a b B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
October 10, 2012 12:40:54 PM

^^^ something wrong with quote up there lol
October 10, 2012 2:43:45 PM

I personally like your build. It's similar to mine. The i7 has shown to be better in performance tests:
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/high_end_cpus.html

Motherboard: ASRock Extreme6 Z77
CPU: I7-3770K @ 4.4Ghz
CPU Cooler: Zalman CNP S9900max-B
Memory: Mushkin Radioactive DDR3 1600 cas latency=7 (2x4GB)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos 240GB SSD
GPU: EVGA GTX670 FTW 2GB
Drives: 1x LG DVD player/burner
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 Midtower
Cooling: NZXT 120mm & 140mm case fans
Monitor: ASUS VS Series 23" 1920x1080
PSU: Corsair GS800 800Watt
OS: Windows 7 premium (64-bit)
Input: Gigabyte wired optical mouse and wired keyboard
October 11, 2012 11:10:29 AM

Hmm, two more questions arose:

1. Do I need any thermal paste for this build? I will order screwdrivers and a wristband. Not sure if I need anything else for the assembly other than a table.

2. Should I place additional fans into the case? It apparently comes with 2 silent fans, but has quite some more fan positions. Should I buy some extra to keept the system cooler?

Cheerio
a b B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
October 11, 2012 11:17:21 AM

about the thermal paste , most of the after market coolers have thermal paste , and check if it doesnt have one , you must buy one , which case you had chosen ?
October 11, 2012 11:19:51 AM

1 - Never used a wristband in my life and never fried anything. I would get some thermal paste stuff comes with it but its good to have in the draw incase needed. Personally I use MX2, AS5 is better but costs more (than I think its worth).

2 - I would run the fans it comes with, if you OC in the future or notice temps are higher than you like then add fans when needed.
October 11, 2012 11:21:56 AM

mrdowntownkiller said:
Which case you had chosen ?



Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case

CPU Cooler: COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO



Another question: Does a high watt PSU draw (considerably) more energy from the grid than a lower watt PSU for the same machine? I was thinking about getting the 800 watt psu somebody suggested, just to not run into power problems later when I put in some extra harddrives, soundcard, or whatever. But I'm not sure if that is going to draw alot more power with the same system or not.
October 11, 2012 11:28:20 AM

A PSU runs most efficiently in its middle 3rd. 800W is just overkill on your build even if you SLi in future and add a pile of HDD's and a big flashing lighting setup your not going to go over 600 (arguably you wont go over 550 even with a 2nd GPU added).
October 11, 2012 11:55:01 AM

wr6133 said:
A PSU runs most efficiently in its middle 3rd. 800W is just overkill on your build even if you SLi in future and add a pile of HDD's and a big flashing lighting setup your not going to go over 600 (arguably you wont go over 550 even with a 2nd GPU added).


So is there any good alternative to my initially choosen

Corsair Enthusiast 650W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply

It's currently sold out where I order and I have no idea when they will get new ones. I suppose there should be plenty of good alternatives on this one?
October 11, 2012 12:02:43 PM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Any of them I'll let you search best prices as I'm from the UK so tend to just use newegg for US parts recommendations.

Basically stick with XFX, Corsair, Antec, Seasonic, OCZ, PC power and cooling

When you find a model go to google and hammer in the model name followed with the word GURU look for any reviews then by guru3d, johnnyguru or hardware secrets.... take these reviews as gospel
October 11, 2012 2:26:28 PM

What about the memory? I picked

Kingston 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory


So it's pretty much the cheapest 8GB 1600 ram i found. Should I upgrade this to some fancy stuff or is that fine? I figured the whole HyperX stuff is probably more marketing than anything else.


(update)
I replaced the memory with

G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory

since it has good reviews on pcpartpicker. It's even a few euros cheaper.
October 11, 2012 6:25:22 PM

Im a fan of Corsair Vengance LP it doesnt have tall heatsinks so never causes worries about cooler clearance (only important if you populate all 4 slots). To be honest though other than that RAM is RAM and anyone screaming X RAM is better than Y RAM at the same speeds is largely unfounded.
October 12, 2012 3:29:23 AM

I'd stay away from OCZ power supplies, but the rest are great. Also, instead of getting a single RAM stick, buy 2 4GB sticks. As for the thermal paste, the CM Hyper 212 Evo comes with a buttload of thermal paste, which actually performs decently so I wouldn't trouble yourself with yet another thing to buy/keep track of.
October 12, 2012 7:26:40 AM

Dupontrocks11 said:
I'd stay away from OCZ power supplies, but the rest are great. Also, instead of getting a single RAM stick, buy 2 4GB sticks. As for the thermal paste, the CM Hyper 212 Evo comes with a buttload of thermal paste, which actually performs decently so I wouldn't trouble yourself with yet another thing to buy/keep track of.


Those OCZ comments are wrong. Current OCZ models review very well, some old models from the past had issues, if we avoid a company on the basis of an old model having had issues in the past we can literally only use seasonic as every other company out there has released something cr@p in the past. Look up guru reviews on ZT, ZS and Fatal1ty series from OCZ (their CURRENT models) they all score well.
October 13, 2012 5:15:11 PM

wr6133 said:
Those OCZ comments are wrong. Current OCZ models review very well, some old models from the past had issues, if we avoid a company on the basis of an old model having had issues in the past we can literally only use seasonic as every other company out there has released something cr@p in the past. Look up guru reviews on ZT, ZS and Fatal1ty series from OCZ (their CURRENT models) they all score well.


I haven't tested the ZS series, but I would definitely not recommend either the ZT or Fatal1ty series. Not only do about 1 in 5 ZT series power supplies fail within the first year, but they are as loud as a leafblower. I bought one for an HTPC build, and I had to return it immediately because of the noise. I ended up buying a cooler master silent pro series, and I've been extremely happy with it. The fatal1ty series was decent, but it has flat cables, which made cable management a pain in the behind. I think of OCZ as the Razer of power supplies. They make aestetically pleasing products, and every once in a while makes a solid product, but generally you should avoid them and pay for quality.

And you don't have to buy only seasonic. Not only can you buy their OEM's from good companies like XFX and PCPAC, but you can buy from other companies that actually make amazing products like CM, Corsair, Silverstone, or Antec. Maybe for long time builders, testing power supplies would be okay, but when someone is new to building, they should just get quality components to make their build as easy as possible.
October 13, 2012 6:03:01 PM

Dupontrocks11 said:
I haven't tested the ZS series, but I would definitely not recommend either the ZT or Fatal1ty series. Not only do about 1 in 5 ZT series power supplies fail within the first year, but they are as loud as a leafblower. I bought one for an HTPC build, and I had to return it immediately because of the noise. I ended up buying a cooler master silent pro series, and I've been extremely happy with it. The fatal1ty series was decent, but it has flat cables, which made cable management a pain in the behind. I think of OCZ as the Razer of power supplies. They make aestetically pleasing products, and every once in a while makes a solid product, but generally you should avoid them and pay for quality.

And you don't have to buy only seasonic. Not only can you buy their OEM's from good companies like XFX and PCPAC, but you can buy from other companies that actually make amazing products like CM, Corsair, Silverstone, or Antec. Maybe for long time builders, testing power supplies would be okay, but when someone is new to building, they should just get quality components to make their build as easy as possible.


Unfortunately the reviewers disagree with you massively and they provide test data where as you provide nothing but......well nothing.

ZT series
http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=...

Fatal1ty
http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=...

ZS
http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=...

You also recommend Coolermaster who are quite commonly known to be extremely hit and miss with PSU's

Quote:
Not only do about 1 in 5 ZT series power supplies fail within the first year


I've used more than 5 ZT's this year and have not seen a fail. Unless you can quantify that statement with facts and figures its pretty much BS

If you have actual proof that the current OCZ series are bad I am all ears please post the proof. I post the proof above that they are actually a decent product at a good price.... please prove me wrong with evidence.
October 13, 2012 10:19:09 PM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Look at the first 6 reviews. I wouldn't buy that power supply... and based on what you see from those reviews, no one else would either

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Again, another 3 star power supply. Anybody who builds computers knows to never skimp on the power supply. So I'm not even sure why we are having this debate...

The options are either, save $0-20 and buy an OCZ power supply that has the chance of failing, or get a decent power supply for $20 bucks more that you KNOW will not fail anytime soon. If you go onto the best rated power supplies on Newegg, you'll see that OCZ doesn't even come close to being the best. And while maybe I'd buy a four star power supply from Seasonic, I certainly wouldn't buy one from OCZ.
OCZ PSUs might be OK, but why should I (or the OP) care? There are other manufacturers who have a better track record when it comes to quality. Not to mention that OCZ fails in other categories. Their return rates for SSD's and RAM are horrendous. Poor quality in a range of similar models is understandable, but poor quality in different types/classes of products just tells me to avoid buying anything from them. What is $20 bucks when you are taking about the life of your computer?

Here's some more articles:

ZT series loud fan:
http://www.ocztechnologyforum.com/forum/showthread.php?...

http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=718... "It's a known issue, RMA to start"
October 13, 2012 11:05:58 PM


As you can't show anything beyond a newegg review your 1 in 5 fail rate is still a made up figure

Your 2 cases of fan noise are not exaactly compelling either

Quote:
Fan should be very very quiet at low load levels like idle. Both my review samples were.
I'd contact OCZ.


Quote:
We will replace the unit if you are unhappy, as the other thread says, send me an email and I will make it happen.


Quote:
Again, another 3 star power supply. Anybody who builds computers knows to never skimp on the power supply. So I'm not even sure why we are having this debate...


Because like any power supply you check the model in question. Blanket stating OCZ are lousy is cr@p and making up your own figures as to fail rates is also ridiculous

You went on to say coolermaster were a good buy....... seriously? They fill the lemon list of PSU's to avoid


October 13, 2012 11:13:47 PM

Hey guys. I see there is some disagreement on the PSU :) 

Well what about

Corsair TX650M 650W Modular

or

Corsair TX750 V2 750W

I realized that while TX650 V2 (my original choice) is sold out, the above ones aren't. By the way should I rather go modular or not? I suppose it would be quite nice to be able to leave unneeded cables out of the system. But then again I read that modular PSU's are more prone to failure due to more possible points of failure (the additional connections) and less efficient.

October 13, 2012 11:19:28 PM

The 750 while more than you need won't do any harm, maybe once modular had issues but generally reputable ones nowdays are fine, Though good cases usually allow you to easily hide cables on non modular
October 14, 2012 12:17:21 AM

If personal accounts and consumer accounts of a product failing don't provide enough evidence to claim that the product is of questionable quality, then what does? 1-5 is a made up figure, but I certainly provided enough evidence to suggest that 1-5 DO fail. Also, 1-5 means that usually the 4 other ones are good. So when someone's fails and another person says "Oh my two worked..." it doesn't exactly fill the statistic. And why are you so against Cooler Master? They might not be Seasonic, but they are certainly better than OCZ.

The models available by CM right now are OEM's of Enhance, which is also used by Silverstone: An undoubtedly amazing PSU company. OCZ on the other hand uses Sirtec OEM's which aren't used in any of the brands you or I mentioned, most likely for a reason. Again, I suggest to direct your eyes to the top rated PSU's of Newegg. Cooler Master inhabits 5th, 7th, and 9th place while OCZ inhabits.... 113th, 116th, and 117th. To quote Newegg, "16 million geeks can't be wrong." The evidence is there, whether you want to accept it or not.

To OP:

The Corsair TX750 V2 is great, but I would suggest a modular power for simplicity's sake. But considering that the TX650 is made by Seasonic and it's modular, I could not suggest anything better. I would highly suggest that one. If you are looking to upgrade further (another GPU) you could consider getting a higher wattage, but even then, a 650 should be sufficient.
October 14, 2012 10:15:10 AM

Dupontrocks11 said:

The Corsair TX750 V2 is great, but I would suggest a modular power for simplicity's sake. But considering that the TX650 is made by Seasonic and it's modular, I could not suggest anything better. I would highly suggest that one.



Hi there, just googled it and found that unlike TX650 V2, the TX650M isn't made by Seasonic but by CWT.

(http://whirlpool.net.au/wiki/psu_manufacturers)

So I understand that Seasonic is the real deal here? There are only 2 Seasonic PSU's at my vendor:

Seasonic X-660W Gold Modular 660W
Seasonic X-760W Gold Modular 760W

And they are a hell of a lot more expensive at 160€ (207 usd) and 181€ (234 usd). :o 

The other option would be to go for the above mentioned

Corsair TX750 V2 750W

This one is made by Seasonic but it is not modular. I think if I want a modular PSU made by Seasonic I would have to pick the brand itself.

October 14, 2012 11:37:00 AM

My mistake lol. What you can do is use that whirlpool OEM list to pick out a psu that is made by seasonic (XFX, some corsair, some PCPAC) or you could take a look on Newegg's best rated power supplies and find one that fits your budget.

This is how I ended up buying my Cooler Master Silent Pro 800W (which I highly suggest.) The key things to look for are
1. A recognizable brand name, I.e. corsair, cooler master, antec, PCPAC, silverstone, seasonic
2. A five star rating by at least 3 people. Sometimes odd power supply companies like Enermax or Xclio make seemingly amazing psu's, but because only one person reviewed it, it has a single 5 star review. I generally avoid those psus until I know that they are a good psu supplier
3. A realistic price. I am sure you will be able to find a psu that fits your budget, but if the price seems to good to be true, it usually is. The only way a company can offer you a cheap product is to make it with cheap components. Often this happens with unrecognizable brands, which is another reason to buy brand name. The price range you are looking at is around $99-140 for a ~750W modular power supply.

So try that, if you have any questions come back :-)
!