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Theory: aggregate bandwidth with multiple cable modems

Last response: in Networking
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January 3, 2005 1:05:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.networking.connectivity (More info?)

SuperCable!

This concept has probably already been thought of, but I was wondering
if any of you know if this has actually been tried.

First, a little background:

I've noticed that in the past year, the max speed of my cable Internet
connection has gone down- probably the result of my cable provider
(Cox) throttling individual connections. I used to get between 350
KB/sec and 400 KB/sec on many downloads, but these days, I'm getting
maximum speeds of about 220 KB/sec. Let's round it off and say that I
have 2,000 Kb (Kilobits) of bandwidth on my downstream connection,
whereas before, I was getting somewhere in the neighborhood of 3,500 -
4,000 Kbits. I don't actually KNOW if Cox is doing this, but I suspect
it, and my reduction in download speeds is a clue. Plus, I saw this
article:
http://www.cabledatacomnews.com/oct02/oct02-2.html
PLUS, I read on the Cox website that they have a "Premium" high-speed
Internet service available, at *twice* the cost of the regular one.
They say that it's available by only making a small "administrative
change" to the account. (Yeah, taking off the bandwidth throttling, no
doubt!)

What gets me is, I'm still paying the same amount of money for much
less bandwidth than I used to have! Has nobody complained about this?

Which got me to thinking. In the old days, some of us would get two
analog (POTS) phone lines and two modems, and attach them to our PC and
dial up our favorite BBS, to get an aggregate bandwidth of 2x what we'd
get with one modem/phone line. And later, when I used ISDN, the two
64-Kbit 'B' channels were added together to get 128 Kbits.

Seems to me that the same thing would be possible by aggregating cable
modem connections.

I'm in a townhouse complex, where there are 57 units. There is one
incoming main cable from Cox, which is split off to give (n) cable
TV/Internet connections to the units. Let's say that there are 10 Cox
customers here who subscribe to their cable Internet service. That's 10
x 2,000 Kb per connection = 20,000 Kbits aggregate bandwidth for the
data streams coming down. But, there's probably only a few people using
their Internet connection at any given time.

I'm theorizing, but I would think that we could have a LAN in the
complex which would tap into all units that have a cable modem,
aggregating the bandwidth, so that this aggregated bandwidth could be
shared among the number of connections actually being used. We would
all get better bandwidth value for our money.

For example, if there were 4 out of the 10 subscribers online at a
given time, the 4 would share the 20,000 Kb aggregate connection,
giving each of the four connections 20,000 / 4 = 5,000 Kb of bandwidth,
or roughly 500 KB/sec on downloads. That definitely sounds better than
200 KB/sec! As subscribers join or leave the LAN, the bandwidth
available to the people online would decrease or increase: 20,000 Kb /
n, where "n" is the number of active connections at a given time. But
you'd never get less than the per-connection bandwidth, even if all 10
subscribers were online at the same time. 20,000 / 10 = 2,000 Kbits.

Has anybody actually tried this? Also, the same concept would apply to
any other Internet connection, such as ADSL. Anybody combining two or
more DSL connections for SuperDSL?

Doug
January 3, 2005 1:58:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.networking.connectivity (More info?)

"clickhere" <dougbrunelle@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1104732324.233054.287600@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> SuperCable!
>
> This concept has probably already been thought of, but I was wondering
> if any of you know if this has actually been tried.
>
> First, a little background:
>
> I've noticed that in the past year, the max speed of my cable Internet
> connection has gone down- probably the result of my cable provider
> (Cox) throttling individual connections. I used to get between 350
> KB/sec and 400 KB/sec on many downloads, but these days, I'm getting
> maximum speeds of about 220 KB/sec. Let's round it off and say that I
> have 2,000 Kb (Kilobits) of bandwidth on my downstream connection,
> whereas before, I was getting somewhere in the neighborhood of 3,500 -
> 4,000 Kbits. I don't actually KNOW if Cox is doing this, but I suspect
> it, and my reduction in download speeds is a clue. Plus, I saw this
> article:
> http://www.cabledatacomnews.com/oct02/oct02-2.html
> PLUS, I read on the Cox website that they have a "Premium" high-speed
> Internet service available, at *twice* the cost of the regular one.
> They say that it's available by only making a small "administrative
> change" to the account. (Yeah, taking off the bandwidth throttling, no
> doubt!)
>
> What gets me is, I'm still paying the same amount of money for much
> less bandwidth than I used to have! Has nobody complained about this?
>
> Which got me to thinking. In the old days, some of us would get two
> analog (POTS) phone lines and two modems, and attach them to our PC and
> dial up our favorite BBS, to get an aggregate bandwidth of 2x what we'd
> get with one modem/phone line. And later, when I used ISDN, the two
> 64-Kbit 'B' channels were added together to get 128 Kbits.
>
> Seems to me that the same thing would be possible by aggregating cable
> modem connections.
>
> I'm in a townhouse complex, where there are 57 units. There is one
> incoming main cable from Cox, which is split off to give (n) cable
> TV/Internet connections to the units. Let's say that there are 10 Cox
> customers here who subscribe to their cable Internet service. That's 10
> x 2,000 Kb per connection = 20,000 Kbits aggregate bandwidth for the
> data streams coming down. But, there's probably only a few people using
> their Internet connection at any given time.
>
> I'm theorizing, but I would think that we could have a LAN in the
> complex which would tap into all units that have a cable modem,
> aggregating the bandwidth, so that this aggregated bandwidth could be
> shared among the number of connections actually being used. We would
> all get better bandwidth value for our money.
>
> For example, if there were 4 out of the 10 subscribers online at a
> given time, the 4 would share the 20,000 Kb aggregate connection,
> giving each of the four connections 20,000 / 4 = 5,000 Kb of bandwidth,
> or roughly 500 KB/sec on downloads. That definitely sounds better than
> 200 KB/sec! As subscribers join or leave the LAN, the bandwidth
> available to the people online would decrease or increase: 20,000 Kb /
> n, where "n" is the number of active connections at a given time. But
> you'd never get less than the per-connection bandwidth, even if all 10
> subscribers were online at the same time. 20,000 / 10 = 2,000 Kbits.
>
> Has anybody actually tried this? Also, the same concept would apply to
> any other Internet connection, such as ADSL. Anybody combining two or
> more DSL connections for SuperDSL?


No theory Doug. go here: http://www.xincom.com/products.html

(¯`·._.· £ãrrÿ ·._.·´¯)
!