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What is the limit of 330w psu?

Last response: in Components
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February 23, 2013 3:13:47 AM

Can a 330W PSU support all these:

Core i5 3550
Asus P8H77-M Pro
2x4GB DDR3 1600 (regular 1.5v)
Gigabyte 650 Ti 2GB [GV-N65TOC-2GI]
and 3-5 case fans (2 high-powered ones as intake)
and 2 CPU cooler fans
and sound card (probably Asus Xonar DX)

thx for answering.

More about : limit 330w psu

February 23, 2013 3:17:07 AM

No. Get a 500w or above to be safe.
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a b ) Power supply
a b Ĉ ASUS
February 23, 2013 5:40:36 AM

Yeah in theory 330W should work. You shouldn't be drawing huge amounts above 200W.
Problem is, a good 330W should work. You haven't specified which PSU you are using and in general, an entry level PSU from a good brand starts at at least 400W.
Nvidia themselves recommend at least a 400W PSU for a GTX650Ti.

Assuming your PSU is pretty poor quality, I really wouldn't risk it. Your system isn't cheap, get a decent PSU.
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February 23, 2013 8:34:16 AM

What's the worst thing that can happen? If there's not enough power, it will just shut down halfway through? That's it right? It won't damage anything?
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February 23, 2013 8:41:52 AM

Worst case scenario on a decent PSU is it will shut down when it draws too much power.
Worst case scenario on a substandard PSU is well... do you keep an extinguisher nearby?

Don't cheap out on a PSU. When only looking at 500W PSU's you're looking at a cost difference of $10-20 between decent and bad parts. Spend the extra money.

A PSU is the easiest part to cheap out on, but it can also be the most expensive part to cheap out on.
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February 23, 2013 8:43:35 AM

quas said:
What's the worst thing that can happen? If there's not enough power, it will just shut down halfway through? That's it right? It won't damage anything?


It can potentially damage itself and other components, though its fairly unlikely.

If you could find out the model of the PSU or take a picture of the sticker on the side it would give a clearer picture.
My concern with that card would be not only the wattage available but whether or not it has a PCIe cable for the graphics card.

In short - it's probably not worth the hassle.
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February 23, 2013 1:03:50 PM

I am thinking of Seasonic II 330W Bronze.

If it everything draws a maximum of 250W, then it's good. Because that's what I aim for: power efficiency.
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Best solution

a c 1176 ) Power supply
a b Ĉ ASUS
February 23, 2013 5:39:41 PM

For a system using a single GeForce GTX 650 Ti graphics card NVIDIA specifies a minimum of a 400 Watt or greater system power supply that has a maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 20 Amps or greater and that has at least one 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector.

The GeForce GTX 650 Ti does not support SLI mode.

Total Power Supply Wattage is NOT the crucial factor in power supply selection!!! Total Combined Continuous Power/Current Available on the +12V Rail(s) rated @ 45°C - 50°C ambient temperature, is the most important factor.

Overclocking of the CPU and/or GPU(s) will require an additional increase to the maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current ratings, recommended above, to meet the increase in power required for the overclock. The additional amount required will depend on the magnitude of the overclock being attempted.

The Seasonic S12II-330 Bronze (SS-330GB), with its maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 24 Amps and with one 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors, is more than sufficient to power your system configuration with a single GeForce GTX 650 Ti graphics card.

The GIGABYTE GV-N65TOC-2GI should be drawing less than 6 Amps from the +12V rail during gaming.
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February 24, 2013 2:30:11 PM

"The GIGABYTE GV-N65TOC-2GI should be drawing less than 6 Amps from the +12V rail during gaming."

What makes you think so?
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a c 288 ) Power supply
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February 24, 2013 2:41:53 PM

quas said:
"The GIGABYTE GV-N65TOC-2GI should be drawing less than 6 Amps from the +12V rail during gaming."

What makes you think so?


If anybody on here know's - it's ko
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February 24, 2013 3:01:17 PM

ko888 said:
For a system using a single GeForce GTX 650 Ti graphics card NVIDIA specifies a minimum of a 400 Watt or greater system power supply that has a maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 20 Amps or greater and that has at least one 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector.

The GeForce GTX 650 Ti does not support SLI mode.

Total Power Supply Wattage is NOT the crucial factor in power supply selection!!! Total Combined Continuous Power/Current Available on the +12V Rail(s) rated @ 45°C - 50°C ambient temperature, is the most important factor.

Overclocking of the CPU and/or GPU(s) will require an additional increase to the maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current ratings, recommended above, to meet the increase in power required for the overclock. The additional amount required will depend on the magnitude of the overclock being attempted.

The Seasonic S12II-330 Bronze (SS-330GB), with its maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 24 Amps and with one 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors, is more than sufficient to power your system configuration with a single GeForce GTX 650 Ti graphics card.

The GIGABYTE GV-N65TOC-2GI should be drawing less than 6 Amps from the +12V rail during gaming.

Nailed it
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a c 1176 ) Power supply
a b Ĉ ASUS
February 24, 2013 5:07:45 PM

quas said:
"The GIGABYTE GV-N65TOC-2GI should be drawing less than 6 Amps from the +12V rail during gaming."

What makes you think so?

Power consumption of the card measured at DC VGA card inputs, not of the whole system (i.e. power consumption of the graphics card only, measured via the PCI-Express power connector(s) and PCI-Express bus slot). You can see the power consumption of a factory overclocked card like the EVGA GTX 650 Ti SSC 2 GB compared to the NVIDIA reference design GeForce GTX 650 Ti card.

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/EVGA/GTX_650_Ti_SSC/...


ASUS GeForce GTX 650 Ti Direct Cu II 1 GB
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_GTX_650...

MSI GeForce GTX 650 Ti Power Edition 1 GB
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/MSI/GTX_650_Ti_Power...

ZOTAC GeForce GTX 650 Ti AMP! Edition 2 GB
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Zotac/GeForce_GTX_65...
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February 24, 2013 11:49:56 PM

Best answer selected by quas.
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