Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Is 38 Decibels loud?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
August 19, 2012 9:55:33 PM

Hi, I've ordered a new graphics card and want to be sure it's going to be quiet. I have ordered the aftermarket Gigabyte GTX 670 and apparently at idle, the cards sound is 30,7 decibels and at peak it is 37,8 decibels. Now I know around 20 decibels is around whisper quiet, so do you think this card will be noticeable in a relatively quiet system?

More about : decibels loud

a c 191 U Graphics card
August 19, 2012 10:20:30 PM

I don't think it would be that loud. If your case has good airflow, then it shouldnt be a problem and you might even be able to adjust the fan.
Related resources
a c 191 U Graphics card
August 20, 2012 1:14:37 AM

^That is an awesome chart.
August 20, 2012 2:09:41 AM

Just remember, you should not talk about decibels naked. It's 1 tenth of a bel ( named after the famous inventor,) and it's only meaningful with a unit of measurement.

You want to say dB SPL for sound pressure. The dB just indicates that it's a logarithmic scale where the value is compared to a reference value. SPL indicates what the reference value is, and what's being measured.
a c 115 U Graphics card
August 20, 2012 2:19:09 AM

michaeljhuman said:
Just remember, you should not talk about decibels naked. It's 1 tenth of a bel ( named after the famous inventor,) and it's only meaningful with a unit of measurement.

You want to say dB SPL for sound pressure. The dB just indicates that it's a logarithmic scale where the value is compared to a reference value. SPL indicates what the reference value is, and what's being measured.


Exactly. It's a measure of gain or loss relative to a reference point
August 20, 2012 4:57:22 AM

What I find interesting, is all the odd looking db scales. They date back to the early days of telephone signals, which I guess would explain why they deal with stuff like 600 ohm resistances.
a c 115 U Graphics card
August 20, 2012 6:04:14 AM

michaeljhuman said:
What I find interesting, is all the odd looking db scales. They date back to the early days of telephone signals, which I guess would explain why they deal with stuff like 600 ohm resistances.


I know exactly what you mean. Prior to about the 1960s the world had a million different ways of doing the same thing, nothing was standardized. If you ever get the chance to do so, take a look at some of the instruments on a world war II ship.
!