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PC not turning on at all after applying thermal paste!

Last response: in CPUs
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February 25, 2013 12:03:30 AM

Hello,
I require some professional help with my pc since it wont turn on at all after i applied some new thermal paste on it!

Here's the details:
I bought some arctic silver 5 thermal paste to apply to the cpu since it was extremely high and i needed it to be lowered.
So i opened up my computer and followed everything as instructed on a youtube video to apply some new thermal paste. I also cleaned the computer inside since it was really dusty everywhere.

The method i applied the thermal paste was in this order : i first took off the heatsink, cleaned the bottom surface of the old thermal paste using some cotton swabs with 70 percent alcohol to remove the thick spots and then used some toilet paper for the rest until most of the old thermal paste was completely removed, then i did the same with the cpu in the cleaning process.
Once they were both clean, i placed a small glob of the new thermal paste in the middle (pea size) and smeared it all over the surface very thinnly, making sure i didnt get it anywhere on the motherboard. After that, i placed the heatsink back on slowly and waited 10 min. I then plugged in the power cord and attempted to boot up my pc. Surprisnigly, it did not turn on whatsoever! I tried to replug the power cord in and checked for any loose wiring but it did nothing to turn on the computer. I thought it was strange because i did everything as instructed.

So i googled for solutions and found basically none helpful. I then just thought maybe i applied too much thermal paste so i had to reopen the case of my pc again and clean off the thermal paste i just applied and apply some new thermal paste on the cpu, this time even less.

I plugged the ac cord back into my pc tower but no luck, it was still not turning on no matter how many times i tried pushing the power button. It's entirely unresponsive!

Can anyone please help me understand what's wrong and what i can do to boot up my pc at least? I'm no computer expert -_-

BTW, when i opened my pc for a second time, i also checked to make sure everything inside was plugged in just in case i accidentally might have unplugged something in there, but sadly everything inside seems to appear plugged in.

More about : turning applying thermal paste

a b à CPUs
February 25, 2013 12:34:18 AM

Did you remove the cpu to clean it? If not there may be some old thermal paste making contact. If so you should double then triple check you have the cpu installed correctly with no bent pins.

When you cleaned out the dust did you use a brush or just suck out the stray bunnies?

Make sure your memory is seated correctly, all connections made by the power supply.

Follow this http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-ste...
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a b à CPUs
February 25, 2013 1:23:22 AM

I just had a guy have the same issue. He forgot to plug back in the 4/8 pin power connector on the motherboard for the cpu power. I guess his motherboard bios was stopping the machine from firing up till it was connected. I could be wrong, but not having the cpu fan connected can cause similar issues in rare cases. Check it out and see.
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February 25, 2013 2:27:56 AM

Well i just recently re-opened my pc again and slowly went through each section, checking what could be the exact problem. I couldn't find any probs with the power supply, i fully tested it but it still doesn't allow my computer to turn on whatsoever.

I then checked every other component but i cant find any obvious problems or disconnections however, once i went to check on the processor very carefully, i did notice a small dent on this one metallic bar/pole that i suppose is used to open or secure the processor, i should upload a pic of it. i dont see any bent pins though.

Could a small dent on that one bar/pole be the problem? Im not sure if it was there in the first place or could have resulted somehow when i was applying thermal paste in the incident of the heatsink falling in when it slid down.

You would think it's a power supply failure or disconnection but it's all connected...
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a b à CPUs
February 25, 2013 3:47:38 AM

Did you remove the CPU from the socket when you cleaned off the thermal paste?
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February 25, 2013 3:58:52 AM


Your PC not powering up has nothing to do with thermal paste. There is no need to re-apply it in different layers. Something happened when you "cleaned out" the PC. You didn't answer jnkweaver's questions as to HOW you cleaned - with a brush or vacuum or compressed air, and did you remove the CPU? Even if we knew, we would still only be guessing at what has been disturbed. It's possible that a static charge has damaged the motherboard, but unlikely.
There is an interesting little comment at the end of your second post: " the incident of the heatsink falling in when it slid down."
If the force of the falling heatsink has put a dent in the hardened steel of the CPU latch, you might consider out-sourcing future PC cleaning ...
Seriously though, this is just the classic "PC not powering up - what should I do?" post. It has been asked a thousand times on this forum. You need to do some classic troubleshooting. There may even be a sticky on this very topic or you could do a quick search. And forget youtube. But without spare parts and without some expertise or at least experience, it will be very difficult.
And another thing. If this thread stays alive, you may get all kinds of suggestions from clearing CMOS, taking out battery for xx minutes, flashing the latest BIOS, installing drivers, to re-installing Windows, running Linux, etc.
Did I mention it will be very difficult ?
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August 5, 2013 6:45:57 PM

Dear all
Kudos to those who suggested a power supply and wiring check, as even if the CPU is not seated right or whatever, the pc will power up but produce a beep error code,

From your posts u seem to have a problem with powering up ur pc, try checking ur motherbord connection with your power ON botton, small jumper-like connectors that can be easily disconnected.

Best luck though its a late answer
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