Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Considering first build for son - gaming pc

Last response: in Systems
Share
October 12, 2012 11:47:22 PM

I'm looking for some advice regarding a potential new build for my son (12y/o) who is interested in gaming. He's currently using an i3 laptop and is looking for better graphics performance in particular. I haven't built an entire system before however I've replaced individual parts in older pc's and have done a bit of electronics work and have friends who can help out.

I've spent a few days researching on this forum and others and have some ideas about where to start but I'm looking for a bit more direction. I've had a go at the new build template as follws:

Approximate Purchase Date: e.g.: between now and December

Budget Range: (800-1300) including shipping to Australia (not sure if rebates will apply) and will probably purchase locally as the prices look similar. US pricing basis is fine as a starting point.

System Usage from Most to Least Important: gaming

Are you buying a monitor: No (He already has a 24" ASUS VS248H LED LCD Monitor 24" Display, 1920x1080 Resolution, 2ms (Gray to Gray) Response, HDMI, D-Sub, DVI-D)

Parts to Upgrade: all new required. Already have Razor mouse, headphones and keyboard

Do you need to buy OS: Yes

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: been using PCpartpicker to research options.

Location: Australia

Parts Preferences: by brand or type leaning towards Intel CPU.

Overclocking: Not initially but would like to have as an option for future as his knowledge increases

SLI or Crossfire: Thought I'd go for a single GPU initially with option to add a second one in the future

Your Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

Additional Comments: Need to have a window and lots of bling. Please also list specific software COD.

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: existing laptop is not up for the task. Having to reduce resolution but still suffers lags.

Here's what I've come up with so far - comments appreciated:

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/k61u
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/k61u/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/k61u/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme6 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($45.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($117.85 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 660 2GB Video Card ($237.55 @ Newegg)
Case: Zalman Z11 Plus ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($126.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1108.32
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

More about : build son gaming

October 13, 2012 12:03:51 AM

1. If he won't be overclocking, there is not reason to get the 3570k. Save some $$ and get a 3450.
i5 3450 3.1 GHz

2. Motherboard is overkill, save $50 and get the Pro 4 edition.
mATX ASRock H77 Pro4

3. I doubt he will use 1TB of storage. Save another $50 and get this
WD Blue 500GB

4. Dual channel memory is faster
G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB

5. PSU is overkill and then some if you don't plan on doing SLI
CORSAIR Builder Series CX500

With these changes you save at least $100, but I'm too lazy to the the exact math.
October 13, 2012 12:49:29 AM

Stay with the 3570K and replace the mobo with a Gigabyte Z77 UD3H.
Get 2x4GB DIMMS, as breadwhistle said.
I wouldnt get the Black drives over the Blue drives. Speed doesnt have much difference. (Unless you want 5 year warranty, which the WD Black does.)

@bread, he said he would like to leave OC and SLI open in the future lol. Good suggestions, nonetheless.
Related resources
October 13, 2012 1:11:34 AM

BreadWhistle said:
1. If he won't be overclocking, there is not reason to get the 3570k. Save some $$ and get a 3450.
i5 3450 3.1 GHz

2. Motherboard is overkill, save $50 and get the Pro 4 edition.
mATX ASRock H77 Pro4

3. I doubt he will use 1TB of storage. Save another $50 and get this
WD Blue 500GB

4. Dual channel memory is faster
G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB

5. PSU is overkill and then some if you don't plan on doing SLI
CORSAIR Builder Series CX500

With these changes you save at least $100, but I'm too lazy to the the exact math.

I would stay with 1tb. Downloaded games from Steam add up fast..
October 13, 2012 2:21:04 AM

^ Oh I didn't notice. But I also don't think it's be the best idea to give a 12 y/o the ability to overclock his PC. The 3570k has an unlocked multiplier so it can be overclocked to whatever you want it to. I don't want his kid to go power happy and fry his CPU.
October 13, 2012 2:51:22 AM

bread hun, his budget is more than enough to support 1tb of storage; the price difference from 500gb -> 1tb isn't really that big, and the only reason for the $50 difference is 'cause his 1tb choice was a Caviar Black, which has a 5-year warranty.

@peter_4059 - here's an AU version of your build, and a few revisions.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($233.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme6 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($175.00 @ Mwave Australia)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.00 @ Mwave Australia)
Storage: Plextor M5S Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($95.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card ($255.00 @ Mwave Australia)
Case: Antec Three Hundred Two ATX Mid Tower Case ($77.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Power Supply: OCZ ZT 650W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($99.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 3-Pack (64-bit) ($99.00 @ Scorptec)
Total: $1117.00
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

The 7870 outperforms and is cheaper than the GTX 660.

650w is more than enough for SLI/Crossfire with the 7870 and 660. It would still have a lot of headroom.

The SSD is where you/your son can install the OS and his favorite games/programs for faster loading times and boot up. The 1TB HDD is where you can store large files and downloads.

I can't find the Zalman case you wanted anywhere, so I just picked another good case. If you know where to get it, feel free to drop the Antec I chose.
October 13, 2012 4:09:20 AM

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/katt

You could get a cheaper mobo like the Extreme4 if necessary.

Made some revisions, and added a CPU cooler. Not an expensive one but something that will allow for a good overclock in a month or two.
October 13, 2012 4:10:10 AM

Thanks for all the responses - I have a few more questions:

1. I was thinking we should go for a Z77 chipset - I think one of the suggestions above was for H77 - are there any pros/cons of either?

2. In terms of MB selection I was basing the ASRock decision on this review:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/z77-extreme6-z77a-g...

Are there any advantages of the Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H over the ASRock Z77 Extreme 6 other than it is a few dollars cheaper? Looks like there are slight differences in SATA configurations.

3. Thanks for pointing out the dual channel RAM decision. In terms of modules I was thinking 1x8GB rather than 2x4GB RAM to enable the maximum RAM (32GB) to be an option down the track without having to replace existing modules. Is there any advantage in going for 2x4GB vs 1x8GB?

4. The i5-3570 supports DDR3-1333/1600 and the MB supports DDR3-1066/1333/1600/2666 - is there any advantage/issues in selecting DDR3-2666 RAM in terms of compatibility? I assume this would only be of value if I was considering changing the CPU to a better LGA1155 one that can use DDR3-2666 down the track?

5. I was basing graphics card decision on passmarks benchmarks for performance and value

http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/high_end_gpus.html

http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/high_end_gpus.html#va...

The cost of the GeForce GTX660 and the Radeon HD7870 is similar however the GeForce seems to get a better wrap in the benchmarks - is there more to this decision?

6. Am I better off getting two lower cost GPUs with SLI or one better more expensive one at this stage in terms of performance? I was thinking one better one now with the option to add another and SLI in the future to boost performance.

7. The case decision at the moment is mainly based on how it looks - I'm sure there is a lot more to this including whether everything will fit, how sturdy it is, how easy it is to get at the insides and how efficient the cooling fans work - where should I go for information to make a good decision?

Really appreciate the help.

Peter

Best solution

October 13, 2012 4:26:40 AM
Share

The H77 cannot overclock, and it cannot Crossfire. It will make an unlocked CPU like the 3570K useless, and the 650w PSU overkill since you can't add a 2nd card anymore.

Not much difference between the two, other than the Gigabyte is more expensive mainly due to Thunderbolt support, which your son will probably not make use of anytime soon.

Not much difference on 1 and 2 RAM modules either, 2 modules perform slightly faster but isn't really noticed on real life, only in benchmarks. That said, you will never need 32gb of RAM, and (2x4gb) is the standard suggestion here.

The CPU doesn't decide RAM frequency limitation, the motherboard does. I don't think there's a CPU where Intel approved more than 1600MHz, even the 3930K doesn't. That said, There's not much difference as well on real life play between frequencies.

I don't know what's wrong with that benchmark, but the 7870 is a better buy.
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/548?vs=660

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-660-gef...

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-660-ti-...

I suggest getting a powerful card now and then SLI/CF in the future.

Don't worry much about cases, everything would most likely fit on a Mid- or Full ATX Tower. It's mostly just preference on the end user.
So just pick one or two cases out, and then post them here if you want feedback about them.
October 13, 2012 5:08:30 AM

Created a build, then realized you wanted a window and potential overclocking if the future. If your going to spend a good $1300 dollars on your build, I'd get a evga 670 ftw. Possibility for sli in the future and will destroy most current games at 40+ fps.

EDIT: Did I mention evga has possibly the best customer service ever?
October 13, 2012 5:18:50 AM

Okay I'm confused here. Isn't this build for your son, who is using some laptop with an i3 in it? That is 12 years old? If so, I don't think it would be the most responsible thing to do to go out and get him some high-horse, $1000 computer that can be overclocked and has a bunch of bells & whistles. If it's just for you, knock yourself out. But for a 12 year old.... Overkill to the maximum.
October 13, 2012 5:19:17 AM

EVGA FTW is good performance-wise, but they have reference cooling and you're paying the same price as other brands with great custom cooling. That will increase the cards temps really high when on load.
October 13, 2012 5:30:14 AM

BreadWhistle said:
Okay I'm confused here. Isn't this build for your son, who is using some laptop with an i3 in it? That is 12 years old? If so, I don't think it would be the most responsible thing to do to go out and get him some high-horse, $1000 computer that can be overclocked and has a bunch of bells & whistles. If it's just for you, knock yourself out. But for a 12 year old.... Overkill to the maximum.


Normally I don't like telling people what to do... but I second this.

Until I was in college, working, and able to buy myself my current rig, I lived with a dual-core Phenom II and a 9800GT. I played games on my off-brand 1600x900 monitor, and was happy with it.

Save yourself a lot of money. Buy him a lower resolution screen, and a cheaper computer.

If you buy him the best, when he's 14, he's going to start demanding better, because the computer you spent over $1000 for won't run Crysis 4 on Ultra with 16xAA.
October 13, 2012 5:30:47 AM

BreadWhistle said:
Okay I'm confused here. Isn't this build for your son, who is using some laptop with an i3 in it? That is 12 years old? If so, I don't think it would be the most responsible thing to do to go out and get him some high-horse, $1000 computer that can be overclocked and has a bunch of bells & whistles. If it's just for you, knock yourself out. But for a 12 year old.... Overkill to the maximum.


He's paying for it! Just trying to get something that will last a few years and allow for upgrades. It looks like around $800 is the minimum he will need to spend to get a step change in performance so a couple of hundred more seemed like a reasonable investment to keep things interesting.

I'm hoping he will develop some interest an get into overclocking/building systems as he gets a bit older. I thought 12 might be a good age to get started? Happy to look at cheaper options though!
October 13, 2012 5:31:12 AM

Only 12 yrs old huh

i5 2500k
ASRock Z68 PRO3 GEN3 LGA 1155
8 GB G.Skill Sniper 1600 1.5v
COOLER MASTER Storm Scout
1 TB WD Black
MSI R7870 Twin Frozr
SeaSonic M12II 620 Bronze

$917
October 13, 2012 5:36:31 AM

DarkSable said:
Normally I don't like telling people what to do... but I second this.

Until I was in college, working, and able to buy myself my current rig, I lived with a dual-core Phenom II and a 9800GT. I played games on my off-brand 1600x900 monitor, and was happy with it.

Save yourself a lot of money. Buy him a lower resolution screen, and a cheaper computer.

If you buy him the best, when he's 14, he's going to start demanding better, because the computer you spent over $1000 for won't run Crysis 4 on Ultra with 16xAA.



Happy to get any advice however too late re the screen - he's already bought this.
October 13, 2012 5:44:06 AM

The way I see it, it would seem like they can afford it anyway. Some parents just really want the best for their sons/daughters, and there's nothing really wrong with that.
October 13, 2012 5:56:53 AM

What price should I be shooting for? I had a look at the price range of each component and came up with the following percentages of the total for each component:
CPU 20%
MB 10%
RAM 5%
GPU 20%
Case 10%
PSU 10%
HDD 10%
OS 10%
Cooler 5%
October 13, 2012 6:05:52 AM

excella1221 said:
The H77 cannot overclock, and it cannot Crossfire. It will make an unlocked CPU like the 3570K useless, and the 650w PSU overkill since you can't add a 2nd card anymore.

Not much difference between the two, other than the Gigabyte is more expensive mainly due to Thunderbolt support, which your son will probably not make use of anytime soon.

Not much difference on 1 and 2 RAM modules either, 2 modules perform slightly faster but isn't really noticed on real life, only in benchmarks. That said, you will never need 32gb of RAM, and (2x4gb) is the standard suggestion here.

The CPU doesn't decide RAM frequency limitation, the motherboard does. I don't think there's a CPU where Intel approved more than 1600MHz, even the 3930K doesn't. That said, There's not much difference as well on real life play between frequencies.

I don't know what's wrong with that benchmark, but the 7870 is a better buy.
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/548?vs=660

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-660-gef...

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-660-ti-...

I suggest getting a powerful card now and then SLI/CF in the future.

Don't worry much about cases, everything would most likely fit on a Mid- or Full ATX Tower. It's mostly just preference on the end user.
So just pick one or two cases out, and then post them here if you want feedback about them.



+1, all of it
October 13, 2012 6:11:52 AM

redeemer said:
Only 12 yrs old huh

i5 2500k
ASRock Z68 PRO3 GEN3 LGA 1155
8 GB G.Skill Sniper 1600 1.5v
COOLER MASTER Storm Scout
1 TB WD Black
MSI R7870 Twin Frozr
SeaSonic M12II 620 Bronze

$917


Any reason you suggest the i5 2500K rather than the i5 3570K? Same for the MB - why Z68 vs Z77?
October 13, 2012 6:33:52 AM

Yeah its cheaper and the z77 and ivybridge isnt any better. Infact I would say that the i5 2500k is a better chip, my old i5 Sandy could hit 5.0Ghz @ 1.44 CPU PLL enabled cooled by the H100 max temp 80 under prime. This is something the i5 3570k can never do not with out burning the house down!
October 13, 2012 6:40:42 AM

peter_4059 said:
What price should I be shooting for? I had a look at the price range of each component and came up with the following percentages of the total for each component:
CPU 20%
MB 10%
RAM 5%
GPU 20%
Case 10%
PSU 10%
HDD 10%
OS 10%
Cooler 5%



There's really no way to percent it out like that... there are three main pieces of advice I can give you, though.

1) The most common rule of thumb for a gaming computer is to spend twice on the gpu what you do on the cpu. (Also, for a gamer, the i5-3570k is the most expensive CPU you should possibly consider.)

2) Don't waste your money on a closed-loop water cooler - if you're going to water cool, do it all the way, because the only reason is to get extreme overclocks on everything.

3) Get an SSD. That's the best thing you can do for a computer right now, be it gaming or otherwise. Don't necessarily put the games he plays the MOST on it... though I know that's counterintuitive. Put the games he plays often, that have long loading screens or load times, on it. MMOs especially gain a HUGE benefit here - loading between zones takes milliseconds, instead of minutes.



First of all, sorry for going off on you a little bit back there... I had just gotten home from work. I teach profoundly gifted high schoolers, a lot of whom are extremely rich and extremely spoiled. One of them today tried to buy an 'A' off of me.


Second of all, if you're trying to get your kid into system building, here are two big things to do. Both of them are making him work for the computer, not just the money. This will make him appreciate it more, because it was a labour from his own hands.

First of all, make him buy a part. Choosing parts for an entire rig is overwhelming, but give him a budget, and let him loose on Newegg to find, say, a graphics card. My dad did that with me when I wanted an upgrade, and it made me feel more connected to my computer... I had something to do with it. (I still have that ancient card around here somewhere; it's got good memories connected with it.)

Secondly, don't build the computer for him. I know it can be overwhelming when you don't know what you're doing, but again, this will make him feel like it's HIS. Have him watch a video on youtube (I like NCIX Tech Tips' video), to learn the basics. Then sit there with him as he puts it together. Don't touch the computer, but give him help when he needs it.

I'm an English teacher, but I teach a auxiliary computer science class as an elective. In it we cover basic computer maintenance, debugging, and so forth, and for their final, I have them do what I outlined above, either with their own computer or with one of the school's. They LOVE it, and learn so much more from it than they would otherwise, and be more competent in the world - computer maintenance is as important a skill now as car maintenance was 30 years ago.
October 13, 2012 6:51:20 AM

@redeemer, 5GHz is quite a rare OC. That chip (I mean the one OCed) is high quality.

^some good advice up there.
October 13, 2012 6:56:17 AM

DarkSable said:
There's really no way to percent it out like that... there are three main pieces of advice I can give you, though.

1) The most common rule of thumb for a gaming computer is to spend twice on the gpu what you do on the cpu. (Also, for a gamer, the i5-3570k is the most expensive CPU you should possibly consider.)

2) Don't waste your money on a closed-loop water cooler - if you're going to water cool, do it all the way, because the only reason is to get extreme overclocks on everything.

3) Get an SSD. That's the best thing you can do for a computer right now, be it gaming or otherwise. Don't necessarily put the games he plays the MOST on it... though I know that's counterintuitive. Put the games he plays often, that have long loading screens or load times, on it. MMOs especially gain a HUGE benefit here - loading between zones takes milliseconds, instead of minutes.



First of all, sorry for going off on you a little bit back there... I had just gotten home from work. I teach profoundly gifted high schoolers, a lot of whom are extremely rich and extremely spoiled. One of them today tried to buy an 'A' off of me.


Second of all, if you're trying to get your kid into system building, here are two big things to do. Both of them are making him work for the computer, not just the money. This will make him appreciate it more, because it was a labour from his own hands.

First of all, make him buy a part. Choosing parts for an entire rig is overwhelming, but give him a budget, and let him loose on Newegg to find, say, a graphics card. My dad did that with me when I wanted an upgrade, and it made me feel more connected to my computer... I had something to do with it. (I still have that ancient card around here somewhere; it's got good memories connected with it.)

Secondly, don't build the computer for him. I know it can be overwhelming when you don't know what you're doing, but again, this will make him feel like it's HIS. Have him watch a video on youtube (I like NCIX Tech Tips' video), to learn the basics. Then sit there with him as he puts it together. Don't touch the computer, but give him help when he needs it.

I'm an English teacher, but I teach a auxiliary computer science class as an elective. In it we cover basic computer maintenance, debugging, and so forth, and for their final, I have them do what I outlined above, either with their own computer or with one of the school's. They LOVE it, and learn so much more from it than they would otherwise, and be more competent in the world - computer maintenance is as important a skill now as car maintenance was 30 years ago.


Thanks for the advice. A lot of what you suggest is exactly what I'm up to. He has been researching the pieces and using the part picker to come up with something within his budget. The reason for the percentages was to work out approx what price range he should be looking at for each piece - no point selecting a CPU/MB only to find out he couldn't afford a GPU. There seems to be a many inter-relationships between the bits - we needed a place to start.

I've suggested he save enough for the whole kit before buying anything. I've got an old desktop that we no longer use that I'm planning to set him loose on over the next few weeks so he can see how it all fits together.
October 13, 2012 2:10:51 PM

peter_4059 said:
Thanks for all the responses - I have a few more questions:

1. I was thinking we should go for a Z77 chipset - I think one of the suggestions above was for H77 - are there any pros/cons of either?

2. In terms of MB selection I was basing the ASRock decision on this review:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/z77-extreme6-z77a-g...

Are there any advantages of the Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H over the ASRock Z77 Extreme 6 other than it is a few dollars cheaper? Looks like there are slight differences in SATA configurations.

3. Thanks for pointing out the dual channel RAM decision. In terms of modules I was thinking 1x8GB rather than 2x4GB RAM to enable the maximum RAM (32GB) to be an option down the track without having to replace existing modules. Is there any advantage in going for 2x4GB vs 1x8GB?

4. The i5-3570 supports DDR3-1333/1600 and the MB supports DDR3-1066/1333/1600/2666 - is there any advantage/issues in selecting DDR3-2666 RAM in terms of compatibility? I assume this would only be of value if I was considering changing the CPU to a better LGA1155 one that can use DDR3-2666 down the track?

5. I was basing graphics card decision on passmarks benchmarks for performance and value

http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/high_end_gpus.html

http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/high_end_gpus.html#va...

The cost of the GeForce GTX660 and the Radeon HD7870 is similar however the GeForce seems to get a better wrap in the benchmarks - is there more to this decision?

6. Am I better off getting two lower cost GPUs with SLI or one better more expensive one at this stage in terms of performance? I was thinking one better one now with the option to add another and SLI in the future to boost performance.

7. The case decision at the moment is mainly based on how it looks - I'm sure there is a lot more to this including whether everything will fit, how sturdy it is, how easy it is to get at the insides and how efficient the cooling fans work - where should I go for information to make a good decision?

Really appreciate the help.

Peter


Stick to Z77

I would say the P8Z77 Pro > Extreme 6 > Extreme 4, especially if the pro is only $10 more like I found. It has a lot useful features built in.

Dual channel is the way to go, you can always add more RAM to get 16 GB later.

1600MHz is enough for RAM speed. Anything higher is simply not worth the extra money.

660 is a good card, but see if you can stretch it to a 7950.

One GPU for now.

You can look at reviews. The reviews reveal the temperature of the case and the features.
October 13, 2012 3:16:31 PM

For the RAM, 32Gbs will be totally useless, even in the future. Right now, games dont even use 4Gbs. So go with what mastrom said.

On the GPU, some games are coded for specific cards like how BF3 performs better on nVidia cards and how Skyrim performs good for BOTH brands. 660 or 7870, depends on what games he plays. If its for games like BF3 and Borderlands 2, get the 660. Otherwise 7870 all the way.
October 13, 2012 4:03:48 PM

redeemer said:
Yeah its cheaper and the z77 and ivybridge isnt any better. Infact I would say that the i5 2500k is a better chip, my old i5 Sandy could hit 5.0Ghz @ 1.44 CPU PLL enabled cooled by the H100 max temp 80 under prime. This is something the i5 3570k can never do not with out burning the house down!

I agree. The 2500k is way better for overclocking because it's less hot.
October 13, 2012 7:04:34 PM

CheesyHotDogPuff said:
I agree. The 2500k is way better for overclocking because it's less hot.


And? Ivy bridge can come close to sandy bridge easily, and it's faster... meaning it's a wash. So you might as well just get the newer technology.
October 14, 2012 1:19:31 AM

Ivy is a bit faster, more efficient and supports PCIe 3.0 (if you dont want to upgrade soon, this is quite a nice feature.), Sandy, well, it is cooler but the difference between temps will be around 5 degrees. Heatsinks are there for a reason when you OC. :) 
October 18, 2012 10:37:26 PM

Best answer selected by peter_4059.
October 18, 2012 11:42:31 PM

Yeah, help him build it, show him a couple of YouTube videos Etc. I'm 13 and I recently built my own computer, half mine, half my dad's. I chose all the parts myself, and I built it all by myself without any human help. And I feel like the pc really is MINE, so do what some of the people above suggested
October 21, 2012 1:09:32 AM

I think we are getting close to a final selection...interested in any last thoughts/warnings before we start ordering.

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme6 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card ($247.55 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF X ATX Full Tower Case ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional Gold 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($152.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($91.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1169.47

Australian prices are slightly higher - looks like it will come in at A$1283 - just under the top of the range we originally set.
October 27, 2012 7:10:20 AM

Very exciting - picked up a lot of the parts this afternoon. So far we've got:
ASRock Z77 Extreme6 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard
Corsair Vengeance (4x4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory
OCZ Vertex 4 128GB SSD
Cooler Master HAF X ATX Full Tower Case
Corsair Professional Gold 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply
Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit)

Still to get:
Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor
Gigabyte Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card but now thinking should go for the Saphire 7870 GHz Edition OC as the Gigabyte has a reputation here of being noisy.

To get later:
Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive


Very impressed with the HAF X and the Corsair AX750.

October 27, 2012 8:19:07 AM

you gonna post pictures? :D 
October 28, 2012 10:55:48 AM

Picked up the 3570K and Caviar Blue today. Spent most of the afternoon putting the pieces together and fired it up tonight - everything working except the chassis speaker - not sure which way this should connect to the MoBo - it has one red and one black wire on each end of a 4 way plug. The MoBo pins are marked 1: +5V, 2: dummy, 3: dummy, 4: Speaker. I would have thought the red wire would go to +5V however don't get a beep on startup with it connected this way. Not sure if there is a BIOS setting that needs to be changed?

My son has already loaded COD4 and has had a play. Even with the on-board graphics it is a big improvement over the old laptop.

Just need to tidy up the cables and will post some photos.

November 2, 2012 8:12:04 AM

Installed the graphics card today. I've now added a post to the gallery page with a link to some images. Couldn't work out how to add them to the post.

Peter
November 2, 2012 9:23:26 AM

You add
!