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Risks with custom resolutions?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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August 20, 2012 2:58:13 PM

I have a laptop computer with integrated Core i5 Intel HD graphics..

I want to use the vga output to connect to an old tech CRT tv that has an RGB input port, So I'm using a vga to RGB cable. I heard that the cable will not work until I set the output of the vga port to that compatible with the TV i.e the resolutions and refresh rate..

on opening the custom resolution section of the Intel HD graphics I get a scary warning about possible damages on using custom resolutions etc.. but no proper mention of what conditions will actually cause the damage. I assume it is referring to increasing settings beyond limit

but here I'm decreasing the settings instead of maximizing it
so if i decrease the resolution and refesh rate to say PAL standards will that hamper the hardware??
a b U Graphics card
August 20, 2012 3:06:50 PM

Don't worry you will not do anything bad that is for running refresh to high on a monitor/TV that cannot handle it. You will not hurt anything.

Thent
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a b U Graphics card
August 20, 2012 3:24:24 PM

allahjane said:
on opening the custom resolution section of the Intel HD graphics I get a scary warning about possible damages on using custom resolutions etc.. but no proper mention of what conditions will actually cause the damage. I assume it is referring to increasing settings beyond limit.

The reason why Intel makes no mention of conditions that may damage the attached equipment is because those conditions will differ from equipment to equipment, may vary depending on environmental parameters, age of the devices, etc. so there is no way for Intel to tell whether or not your custom settings can damage the equipment and to what extent.

CRTs are a complex coordination of high-voltage and high-current components, they certainly have enough energy to self-destruct if an unexpected signal mix gets past the CRT's safety/sanity lock-outs and cause some circuitry to operate beyond their SOA. This is unlikely but it can and has happened.
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